Buffalo Bill in Tomahawk Territory (1952)

64 or 66 mins | Comedy-drama, Western | 8 February 1952

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Buffalo Bill's Wagon Train ... More Less

The working title of this film was Buffalo Bill's Wagon Train . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
16 Feb 1952.
---
Daily Variety
28 Jan 52
p. 4.
Film Daily
29 Feb 52
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jan 52
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
2 Feb 52
p. 1222.
Variety
20 Jan 52
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
Story and scr
Story and scr
Commentary
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Props
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir and comp
Specialty numbers by
SOUND
Sd eng
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to prod
Prod asst
SOURCES
SONGS
"On the Old Panhandle Trail," music and lyrics by Max Rich and Allan Flynn.
COMPOSERS
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Buffalo Bill's Wagon Train
Release Date:
8 February 1952
Copyright Claimant:
Jack Schwarz Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
18 February 1952
Copyright Number:
LP1771
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
64 or 66
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15452
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the early days of America's westward expansion, famous scout Buffalo Bill Cody and his pal Cactus are traveling through Indian territory to deliver cattle to Chief White Cloud when they witness a Sioux attack on a wagon train. The two come to the aid of the train, which appears to be a "marrying train," composed solely of women, and succeed in scaring off the attackers. However, when the dust settles, Buffalo Bill and Cactus are surprised to discover that the wagon train is headed by Lt. Bryan, and that the "women" are actually U.S. Cavalry soldiers in disguise. Analyzing the attack, Buffalo Bill concludes that the Sioux retreat was uncharacteristic of Indian ambushes and begins to suspect that the attackers may not have been real Sioux. Furthermore, Buffalo Bill cannot understand why Chief White Cloud would go back on his word and break a peace agreement. When Buffalo Bill and Cactus return to town, they are surrounded by citizens who are angry about the ambush and demand that Buffalo Bill cancel his cattle delivery. The townspeople are being spurred to action by Bill Stokey and Blake, who are trying to stir up trouble with the Indians in order to sabotage the peace effort, which they see as a threat to their plans to dig up gold buried under Indian land. A bruising fistfight ensues, during which Buffalo Bill knocks Stokey unconscious. Janet, who is engaged to Lt. Bryan but is having doubts about becoming an "army wife," has also been swept into Stokey's gang. After the fight, Buffalo Bill leaves the cattle in town and goes to Chief ... +


In the early days of America's westward expansion, famous scout Buffalo Bill Cody and his pal Cactus are traveling through Indian territory to deliver cattle to Chief White Cloud when they witness a Sioux attack on a wagon train. The two come to the aid of the train, which appears to be a "marrying train," composed solely of women, and succeed in scaring off the attackers. However, when the dust settles, Buffalo Bill and Cactus are surprised to discover that the wagon train is headed by Lt. Bryan, and that the "women" are actually U.S. Cavalry soldiers in disguise. Analyzing the attack, Buffalo Bill concludes that the Sioux retreat was uncharacteristic of Indian ambushes and begins to suspect that the attackers may not have been real Sioux. Furthermore, Buffalo Bill cannot understand why Chief White Cloud would go back on his word and break a peace agreement. When Buffalo Bill and Cactus return to town, they are surrounded by citizens who are angry about the ambush and demand that Buffalo Bill cancel his cattle delivery. The townspeople are being spurred to action by Bill Stokey and Blake, who are trying to stir up trouble with the Indians in order to sabotage the peace effort, which they see as a threat to their plans to dig up gold buried under Indian land. A bruising fistfight ensues, during which Buffalo Bill knocks Stokey unconscious. Janet, who is engaged to Lt. Bryan but is having doubts about becoming an "army wife," has also been swept into Stokey's gang. After the fight, Buffalo Bill leaves the cattle in town and goes to Chief White Cloud to find out if he was behind the recent ambush. En route, he is attacked by a small group of renegade Indians under the command of Running Deer, who is White Cloud's rebellious son, and who is in league with Stokey and his men. The attack is thwarted by White Cloud, who arrives on the scene in time to save Buffalo Bill. Running Deer is later captured by the Sioux, and, when White Cloud refuses to kill him, the dishonored captive kills himself. Now certain that White Cloud is innocent of the wagon train attack, Buffalo Bill returns to the task of delivering the cattle to the Sioux. His mission is confounded, however, when Stokey and his men stampede the cattle. The failure of Buffalo Bill to deliver the cattle results in White Cloud issuing an ultimatum that carries the threat of war. Buffalo Bill tries to diffuse the situation by securing some buffalo for the Sioux, but Stokey and his men sabotage his efforts again, this time by dressing up as Indians and raiding his train. When Buffalo Bill learns the truth about Stokey and his motives, he approaches White Cloud and persuades him to call off the war party. The fake Indians are eventually exposed by Buffalo Bill, and Stokey and Blake are killed. With the threat to the peace treaty eliminated, White Cloud reaffirms his determination to remain friendly with the United States, and Janet and Lt. Bryan resume their romance. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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