Frisco Kid (1935)

77 mins | Drama | 30 November 1935

Director:

Lloyd Bacon

Producer:

Sam Bischoff

Cinematographer:

Sol Polito

Editor:

Owen Marks

Production Designer:

John Hughes

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

The Var review noted the film's similarity to Goldwyn's 1935 film The Barbary Coast (see above). MPH mentioned the film marked silent screen star Estelle Taylor's return to the screen after a three year ... More Less

The Var review noted the film's similarity to Goldwyn's 1935 film The Barbary Coast (see above). MPH mentioned the film marked silent screen star Estelle Taylor's return to the screen after a three year absence. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
5 Aug 35
p. 3.
Film Daily
30 Oct 35
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 35
p. 4.
Motion Picture Daily
24 Oct 35
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald
31 Aug 35
p. 54.
Motion Picture Herald
2 Nov 35
p. 62.
New York Times
25 Nov 35
p. 22.
Variety
27 Nov 35
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Story and scr
Story and scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
DETAILS
Release Date:
30 November 1935
Production Date:
began 7 August 1935
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
12 November 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5927
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
77
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
1477
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the mid-nineteenth century, Spider Burke's men make a mistake when they try to shanghai sailor Bat Morgan. Bat overcomes his attacker and sends him off to sea in his place. With his earnings, Bat heads to Paul Morra's saloon on the Barbary Coast. There, he confronts the Shanghai Duck, a man who earns his living by selling men as sailors to ships heading for China. During their fight, Bat kills the Duck. Crusading newspaper editor Charles Ford, who witnesses the struggle, congratulates Bat for winning an unfair fight and for killing a worthless man. Impressed, Morra offers Bat a job. Under the sponsorship of politician James Daley, ambitious Bat organizes the Coast against Ford, who is fighting to clean up vice conditions there. Using the money he makes from the arrangement, Bat opens up his own saloon, which is elegant enough to attract society people. Tired of Ford's campaign against the Coast, Daley plans to kill him. When she learns of the plan, Jean Barrat, the owner of the paper, begs Bat to prevent the murder. Out of respect for Ford and love for Jean, he does. Although Jean returns Bat's love, she feels that they are separated by their different attitudes toward the Barbary Coast. In an effort to lure society people away from the Coast, Judge Crawford brings an opera company to town. Bat passes out tickets to everyone who works on the Coast. At the opera, Crawford insults Morra, who responds by killing him. Ford then declares war on the Coast and Daley kills him. Outraged by the murders, Jean runs ... +


In the mid-nineteenth century, Spider Burke's men make a mistake when they try to shanghai sailor Bat Morgan. Bat overcomes his attacker and sends him off to sea in his place. With his earnings, Bat heads to Paul Morra's saloon on the Barbary Coast. There, he confronts the Shanghai Duck, a man who earns his living by selling men as sailors to ships heading for China. During their fight, Bat kills the Duck. Crusading newspaper editor Charles Ford, who witnesses the struggle, congratulates Bat for winning an unfair fight and for killing a worthless man. Impressed, Morra offers Bat a job. Under the sponsorship of politician James Daley, ambitious Bat organizes the Coast against Ford, who is fighting to clean up vice conditions there. Using the money he makes from the arrangement, Bat opens up his own saloon, which is elegant enough to attract society people. Tired of Ford's campaign against the Coast, Daley plans to kill him. When she learns of the plan, Jean Barrat, the owner of the paper, begs Bat to prevent the murder. Out of respect for Ford and love for Jean, he does. Although Jean returns Bat's love, she feels that they are separated by their different attitudes toward the Barbary Coast. In an effort to lure society people away from the Coast, Judge Crawford brings an opera company to town. Bat passes out tickets to everyone who works on the Coast. At the opera, Crawford insults Morra, who responds by killing him. Ford then declares war on the Coast and Daley kills him. Outraged by the murders, Jean runs an editorial calling for the organization of vigilantes. The vigilantes hang Morra and Daley and then move on to the Coast, burning down buildings as they go. The mob arrests Bat, intending to hang him until Jean passionately pleads for his life. Moved by her argument, the crowd agrees to parole Bat into Jean's custody, and at last Bat and Jean are on the same side. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.