Ride, Vaquero! (1953)

90-91 mins | Western | 17 July 1953

Director:

John Farrow

Writer:

Frank Fenton

Producer:

Stephen Ames

Cinematographer:

Robert Surtees

Editor:

Harold F. Kress

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Arthur Lonergan

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The working title for this film was Vaquero . A 2 Jul 1952 HR news item reported that television actress Rita Gam had tested for the leading role. According to a 29 Jul 1952 news item in HR , Jay C. Flippen was cast, but he was not in the film. HR news items add Dave Cashner and Cal Perry to the cast, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Portions of the film were shot on location in Kanab and Sky Valley, UT. The picture marked John Farrow's first credited film for M-G-M, although he had done some work on the 1936 film Tarzan Escapes (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ). Ride, Vaquero! was also the last film of producer Stephen Ames, who died on 22 Apr ... More Less

The working title for this film was Vaquero . A 2 Jul 1952 HR news item reported that television actress Rita Gam had tested for the leading role. According to a 29 Jul 1952 news item in HR , Jay C. Flippen was cast, but he was not in the film. HR news items add Dave Cashner and Cal Perry to the cast, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Portions of the film were shot on location in Kanab and Sky Valley, UT. The picture marked John Farrow's first credited film for M-G-M, although he had done some work on the 1936 film Tarzan Escapes (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ). Ride, Vaquero! was also the last film of producer Stephen Ames, who died on 22 Apr 1954. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
20 Jun 1953.
---
Daily Variety
19 Jun 53
p. 3.
Film Daily
1 Jul 53
p. 6.
Harrison's Reports
20 Jun 53
p. 98.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Mar 1952.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jul 52
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jul 52
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jul 52
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jul 52
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 52
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Aug 52
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Aug 52
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Aug 52
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Aug 52
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Sep 52
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jun 53
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
20 Jun 53
p. 1879.
New York Times
16 Jul 53
p. 17.
The Exhibitor
1 Jul 53
p. 3546.
Variety
14 Mar 1952.
---
Variety
24 Jun 53
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
MUSIC
SOUND
Rec supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Hair styles
Makeup created by
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Tech adv
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Vaquero
Release Date:
17 July 1953
Production Date:
21 July--early September 1952
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
17 June 1953
Copyright Number:
LP2682
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Color
Ansco color
Lenses/Prints
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
90-91
Length(in feet):
8,115
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16157
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Following the end of the Civil War, rough-hewn Mexican bandit leader Jose Esqueda warns the people in his South Texas village that they are in danger of losing their land to the homesteading "Americanos," who are descending upon the Brownsville area. While the villagers cheer Esqueda when he vows to burn down the settlers' homes, Rio, an American who was reared by Esqueda's mother and regards him as a brother, shows little support for the plan. The first hacienda the bandits set on fire is the new home built by rancher King Cameron for his wife Cordelia. Risking his life to do what he believes is right, Cameron organizes a meeting at the local church to put a stop to Esqueda's raids. Esqueda and Rio are among those attending the meeting, and when Cameron calls Esqueda a "murderer, a thief and a coward," the bandit laughs openly at his accusations. The meeting ends abruptly after Cameron vows to fight Esqueda. No sooner does Cameron rebuild his house, than Esqueda sends Rio and his men to burn it down again. Father Antonio, the respected village priest, warns Cameron that Esqueda is planning an attack on his property and, while praying for the couple's safety, helps them ward off the gang. The gun battle is cut short with the arrival of the rangers, and Rio is captured by Cameron. Instead of turning Rio over to the soldiers, Cameron offers him a partnership, and insists that the bandit help him bring over some horses from Mexico. Though Cordelia disapproves of the plan, believing that Rio should not be trusted, the two men quickly depart for Mexico. Along the ... +


Following the end of the Civil War, rough-hewn Mexican bandit leader Jose Esqueda warns the people in his South Texas village that they are in danger of losing their land to the homesteading "Americanos," who are descending upon the Brownsville area. While the villagers cheer Esqueda when he vows to burn down the settlers' homes, Rio, an American who was reared by Esqueda's mother and regards him as a brother, shows little support for the plan. The first hacienda the bandits set on fire is the new home built by rancher King Cameron for his wife Cordelia. Risking his life to do what he believes is right, Cameron organizes a meeting at the local church to put a stop to Esqueda's raids. Esqueda and Rio are among those attending the meeting, and when Cameron calls Esqueda a "murderer, a thief and a coward," the bandit laughs openly at his accusations. The meeting ends abruptly after Cameron vows to fight Esqueda. No sooner does Cameron rebuild his house, than Esqueda sends Rio and his men to burn it down again. Father Antonio, the respected village priest, warns Cameron that Esqueda is planning an attack on his property and, while praying for the couple's safety, helps them ward off the gang. The gun battle is cut short with the arrival of the rangers, and Rio is captured by Cameron. Instead of turning Rio over to the soldiers, Cameron offers him a partnership, and insists that the bandit help him bring over some horses from Mexico. Though Cordelia disapproves of the plan, believing that Rio should not be trusted, the two men quickly depart for Mexico. Along the way, Rio proves his trustworthiness when he saves Cameron from drowning in a river. Soon after Cameron and Rio return from Mexico, Esqueda discovers their partnership, but forgives his foster brother's apparent desertion as he believes that Rio joined Cameron because he is in love with Cordelia. Cordelia eventually comes to trust Rio, and one day, when Cameron is away, she asks him to take her to Esqueda. Angered by Esqueda's rude dismissal of her request that he end his raids, Cordelia grabs his gun and threatens to kill him. She decides not to shoot, however, when Esqueda tells her that Rio would be killed by his gang as a consequence of her action. Later, Cordelia, now in love with Rio, steals a kiss from him, but he strikes her for the impropriety. When Esqueda learns that Rio has been spurned by Cordelia, he believes that Rio will now remain loyal to him and will not interfere with a raid on the "gringo" town of Brownsville. Esqueda and his gang then shoot their way into Brownsville, kill the sheriff and rob the bank. In a drunken rage, Esqueda decides to kill Rio, Cordelia and Cameron, and sends one of his men to find them. Meanwhile, word of the siege of Brownsville reaches the Cavalry commander, who immediately sets out to regain control of the town. Esqueda's men flee when they see the approaching Cavalry, but the bandit leader stays behind to kill Cameron. After wounding Cameron with four gunshots, Esqueda is about to kill him, when Rio arrives and points his gun at him. The two face off in a gun draw and are killed simultaneously. As Father Antonio prays over the dead men, Cameron returns to the arms of Cordelia, whom he forgives for her feelings for Rio. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.