Indian Uprising (1952)

74-75 mins | Western | January 1952

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HISTORY

This film's working title was War Cry . As the print available for viewing was missing approximately 24 minutes, the summary was based on several additional contemporary sources. According to other contemporary sources, Howard St. John was replaced by Robert Shayne in the role of "Maj. Nathan Stark." In the film, "Geronimo" speaks in Spanish, which is translated for the whites by his son "Tubai," who learned English at a missionary school. In real life, Geronimo surrendered for the last time in Sep 1886. He and several hundred Apaches were sent to prison in Florida and, later, in Alabama. Geronimo died, still a prisoner, in 1909.
       The film's screenplay and story were also the basis for the 1964 Twentieth Century-Fox release Apache Rifles (see above), directed by William Witney and starring Audie ... More Less

This film's working title was War Cry . As the print available for viewing was missing approximately 24 minutes, the summary was based on several additional contemporary sources. According to other contemporary sources, Howard St. John was replaced by Robert Shayne in the role of "Maj. Nathan Stark." In the film, "Geronimo" speaks in Spanish, which is translated for the whites by his son "Tubai," who learned English at a missionary school. In real life, Geronimo surrendered for the last time in Sep 1886. He and several hundred Apaches were sent to prison in Florida and, later, in Alabama. Geronimo died, still a prisoner, in 1909.
       The film's screenplay and story were also the basis for the 1964 Twentieth Century-Fox release Apache Rifles (see above), directed by William Witney and starring Audie Murphy. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
5 Jan 1952.
---
Daily Variety
26 Dec 1951.
---
Film Daily
15 Jan 1952.
---
Harrison's Reports
29 Dec 51
pp. 206-07.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Apr 51
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Apr 1951
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Dec 1951.
---
Motion Picture Daily
3 Jan 1952.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
29 Dec 1951.
---
The Exhibitor
2 Jan 52
p. 3213.
Variety
26 Dec 1951.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
War Cry
Release Date:
January 1952
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 26 January 1952
Production Date:
13 April--7 May 1951
retakes 20 July 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
31 December 1951
Copyright Number:
LP1408
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
SuperCinecolor
Duration(in mins):
74-75
Length(in feet):
6,753
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
15296
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1885, a small band of Apache Indians, led by Geronimo, are captured by U.S. Cavalry captain Case McCloud, who respects the Apache and Geronimo, in particular. At Fort Steele, Arizona, Geronimo signs a peace treaty on the understanding that the land he is to be given will be free of white men. When three white men, Benjamin Alsop, Cliff Taggert and Dan Avery, promote gold mining in the mountains on the Indians' land, Case closes them down. Case is romantically involved with Norma Clemson, who intends to open a school on the reservation so that Indians can have the same opportunities as anyone else and become useful citizens. Taggert and Avery attempt to bribe Case to permit mining on the reservation, but he throws them out. After anti-Indian political maneuvering in Washington results in Case being relieved of command, the miners resume operations and take Tubai, Geronimo's son, hostage and torture him. Case and several soldiers free Tubai. Maj. Nathan Stark, sent to replace Case, does not enforce the treaty for fear of censure by the citizens of nearby Tucson. Alsop and Taggert plan to murder a white man and make it appear to have been done by the Apaches so that warfare will erupt. Taggert kills an old miner, Sagebrush, with an Arapaho arrow and takes the body to the fort, where his gunmen kill Indians who have come there in peace. Case orders his soldiers to fire on Taggert and his men, and after several are killed, is arrested and relieved of duty. Geronimo attacks one of Stark's troops, trapping them. In the meantime, Case learns that Sagebrush was killed by an arrow from a distant ... +


In 1885, a small band of Apache Indians, led by Geronimo, are captured by U.S. Cavalry captain Case McCloud, who respects the Apache and Geronimo, in particular. At Fort Steele, Arizona, Geronimo signs a peace treaty on the understanding that the land he is to be given will be free of white men. When three white men, Benjamin Alsop, Cliff Taggert and Dan Avery, promote gold mining in the mountains on the Indians' land, Case closes them down. Case is romantically involved with Norma Clemson, who intends to open a school on the reservation so that Indians can have the same opportunities as anyone else and become useful citizens. Taggert and Avery attempt to bribe Case to permit mining on the reservation, but he throws them out. After anti-Indian political maneuvering in Washington results in Case being relieved of command, the miners resume operations and take Tubai, Geronimo's son, hostage and torture him. Case and several soldiers free Tubai. Maj. Nathan Stark, sent to replace Case, does not enforce the treaty for fear of censure by the citizens of nearby Tucson. Alsop and Taggert plan to murder a white man and make it appear to have been done by the Apaches so that warfare will erupt. Taggert kills an old miner, Sagebrush, with an Arapaho arrow and takes the body to the fort, where his gunmen kill Indians who have come there in peace. Case orders his soldiers to fire on Taggert and his men, and after several are killed, is arrested and relieved of duty. Geronimo attacks one of Stark's troops, trapping them. In the meantime, Case learns that Sagebrush was killed by an arrow from a distant tribe. After a young lieutenant allows Case to escape, he induces Avery to admit that Taggert has been in Arapaho country. Case then finds the bow and arrows in Alsop's office and takes him into the foothills. Taggert shoots Alsop, but Case beats him up and takes him to where the soldiers are pinned down. Case reports to Stark and offers to talk with Geronimo and explain how he has been tricked into war. After Taggert has confessed to Stark that he killed Sagebrush and Alsop, Case shows his signed confession to Geronimo and asks him to meet with Stark. Geronimo asks Stark to swear that a new treaty will be kept, but the major refuses to do so. After Cavalry reinforcements arrive from another fort, Geronimo is captured, and Stark reveals to Case that he was sent west specifically to accomplish this, and that Geronimo will be going to a prison in Florida. Later, Case resigns from the Army and goes to see Geronimo, who is being held at the fort. He offers the chief his sword and tells him that he feels great dishonor. After Geronimo tells him that he should keep his sword, that his people will honor it as the only one raised in their defense by the white man, Case decides to remain in the Army and plans to marry Norma. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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