This Rebel Breed (1960)

90 mins | Drama | 19 March 1960

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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Juvenile Jungle , Fuzz , Black Rebels and All God's Children . Acccording to a Sep 1959 HR news item, the titled was changed from This Angry Age after Columbia protested that is was too similiar to that of its 1958 film This Angry Age (see above). Although May 1959 HR news items added Roger Wright, Jerry Brent and Shirley Jones to the cast, the appearance of Wright and Brent in the film has not been confirmed and Jones was not in the picture.
       According to information in the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, in Jul 1956, a contract was being negotiated between Bob Hope Enterprises and the International Association of Chiefs of Police for a yearly feature and a television series to be produced that would be based on police cases. Producer William Rowland was involved in these negotiations.
       The feature, which became This Rebel Breed , was based on a story that appeared in the Los Angeles Police Department's magazine Beat , which had been chosen by the I.A.C.P. as the outstanding police story of the year. By May 1957, the agreement had been executed between the I.A.C.P. and a company called Police Hall of Fame, Inc., in which Rowland and Monte Brice were executive producers and A. B. Guthrie, Jr. had an interest. Bob Hope, associated with the company, had discussed a distribution deal with United Artists by the time a script was submitted to the PCA for approval.
       Although the PCA deemed the ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Juvenile Jungle , Fuzz , Black Rebels and All God's Children . Acccording to a Sep 1959 HR news item, the titled was changed from This Angry Age after Columbia protested that is was too similiar to that of its 1958 film This Angry Age (see above). Although May 1959 HR news items added Roger Wright, Jerry Brent and Shirley Jones to the cast, the appearance of Wright and Brent in the film has not been confirmed and Jones was not in the picture.
       According to information in the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, in Jul 1956, a contract was being negotiated between Bob Hope Enterprises and the International Association of Chiefs of Police for a yearly feature and a television series to be produced that would be based on police cases. Producer William Rowland was involved in these negotiations.
       The feature, which became This Rebel Breed , was based on a story that appeared in the Los Angeles Police Department's magazine Beat , which had been chosen by the I.A.C.P. as the outstanding police story of the year. By May 1957, the agreement had been executed between the I.A.C.P. and a company called Police Hall of Fame, Inc., in which Rowland and Monte Brice were executive producers and A. B. Guthrie, Jr. had an interest. Bob Hope, associated with the company, had discussed a distribution deal with United Artists by the time a script was submitted to the PCA for approval.
       Although the PCA deemed the script unacceptable due to "excessive violence and brutality among juveniles," by 22 May 1958, a revised script was judged to meet the PCA's requirements. In May 1959, a week before filming began, Rowland wrote to the PCA regarding the film on Paramount Pictures letterhead; it is not known, however, if Paramount was involved with the production or financing of this film. By this time, the producers had arranged a distribution deal with Warner Bros.
       Prior to filming, the PCA pointed out three troublesome areas in the final screenplay: the violence and brutality; "excessive use of the words 'spic' and 'nigger'"; and the "casual" treatment of "Lola's" pregnancy. Concerning the use of racial invective, a PCA official wrote, "Since these words are obviously offensive to certain people their use should be limited to those situations where the words have dramatic validity."
       The film was not exhibited in the cities of Memphis, Atlanta, Dallas and Fort Worth. According to a DV article, the film was booked for a 30 Mar 1960 opening in Memphis, but withdrawn after the head of the censor board and a second member objected to the film, saying it "shows teenagers selling drugs, and unfavorably portrays white, Negro and Mexican races." Although the board failed to muster the votes to ban the film, Rowland filed an equity suit in the Memphis Federal Court in May 1960 against the censor board, but withdrew the suit following a request by Warner Bros. A Var article states that the theater manager in Memphis said the film had never been booked. The censor boards in Atlanta, Dallas and Fort Worth rejected the film for exhibition. In 1965, Rowland, who had regained the film's rights, began releasing it under the title Lola's Mistake .
       HR called This Rebel Breed the first theatrical film to be "completely 'serviced'" by Ziv-TV. Location shooting was done in East Los Angeles. NYT commented that the film "substitutes action for insight but maintains enough excitement to place it a cut or two above the usual sensationalized products of the genre." Var stated, "Its aims may be lofty, to promote some racial common sense through horrible example, but its narrative means are suspect. A brief lecture at the film's conclusion does not quite wash away repeated use of crude racial terms or explicit scenes of inter-racial cruelty and violence." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
22 Feb 1960.
---
Daily Variety
1 Oct 1959.
---
Daily Variety
4 Feb 60
p. 3.
Daily Variety
23 May 1960.
---
Daily Variety
2 Jun 1965.
---
Film Daily
17 Feb 60
p. 46.
Harrison's Reports
6 Feb 60
p. 24.
Hollywood Reporter
20 May 1959
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
22 May 59
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
29 May 1959
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jun 1959
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jun 59
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Sep 1959
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Feb 1960
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jun 1965.
---
Los Angeles Times
25 May 1960.
---
Los Angeles Times
18 Jun 1960.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
5 Mar 60
p. 612.
New York Times
5 May 60
p. 41.
The Exhibitor
17 Feb 60
p. 4679.
Variety
10 Feb 60
p. 6.
Variety
1 Jun 1960.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story
Story ed and consultant
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Chief set elec
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
MUSIC
Mus ed
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
All God's Children
Black Rebels
Fuzz
Juvenile Jungle
Lola's Mistake
This Angry Breed
Release Date:
19 March 1960
Production Date:
late May--early June 1959 at Ziv Studios
Copyright Claimant:
All God's Children Co.
Copyright Date:
19 March 1960
Copyright Number:
LP20181
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
90
Length(in feet):
8,305
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
19411
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

After an altercation between members of the Ebonies, a black teenage gang, and Buck Madison, leader of the white gang, the Royals, and his girl friend Wiggles, police lieutenant Robert Brooks of the juvenile division assigns rookies Frank Serano and Don Walters to infiltrate the gangs at Bailey Union High School. Frank is of mixed Mexican and African-American heritage, while Don is white. At the school, a social science teacher assigns Lola Montalvo and Frank to be partners in a debate arguing that racial hatred is a mark of ignorance. Although Lola snubs Frank at first, they begin to study together, which provokes her brother Manuel, leader of the Mexican-American gang, the Caballeros, to warn Frank to keep away from Lola. Aided by gang, Manuel beats up Frank as he leaves the library with Lola. When Lola's father learns about the attack, he reprimands her for sneaking off to meet blacks and for "making eyes at Anglos." Papa, though, tries to convince Manuel to learn tolerance, but Manuel bitterly blames the death of his white mother on the fact that her family would not speak to her after she married Papa. When Buck approaches Manuel about joining forces to sell marijuana in the "spic" market, they have a scuffle, and Manuel loses a religious necklace, which Buck pockets. Meanwhile, Frank speaks with Satchel, the leader of the Ebonies, about joining, but Satchel refuses because Frank is half-Mexican. After Buck tries to kiss Lola in the school hallway, Frank trips Buck, who calls him a "dirty nigger," but their fight is interrupted by a school official. During a party, Buck buys drugs from ... +


After an altercation between members of the Ebonies, a black teenage gang, and Buck Madison, leader of the white gang, the Royals, and his girl friend Wiggles, police lieutenant Robert Brooks of the juvenile division assigns rookies Frank Serano and Don Walters to infiltrate the gangs at Bailey Union High School. Frank is of mixed Mexican and African-American heritage, while Don is white. At the school, a social science teacher assigns Lola Montalvo and Frank to be partners in a debate arguing that racial hatred is a mark of ignorance. Although Lola snubs Frank at first, they begin to study together, which provokes her brother Manuel, leader of the Mexican-American gang, the Caballeros, to warn Frank to keep away from Lola. Aided by gang, Manuel beats up Frank as he leaves the library with Lola. When Lola's father learns about the attack, he reprimands her for sneaking off to meet blacks and for "making eyes at Anglos." Papa, though, tries to convince Manuel to learn tolerance, but Manuel bitterly blames the death of his white mother on the fact that her family would not speak to her after she married Papa. When Buck approaches Manuel about joining forces to sell marijuana in the "spic" market, they have a scuffle, and Manuel loses a religious necklace, which Buck pockets. Meanwhile, Frank speaks with Satchel, the leader of the Ebonies, about joining, but Satchel refuses because Frank is half-Mexican. After Buck tries to kiss Lola in the school hallway, Frank trips Buck, who calls him a "dirty nigger," but their fight is interrupted by a school official. During a party, Buck buys drugs from a white racist named Elliott, who has urged Buck to sell the drug in the Mexican neighborhood. Elliott, who wants to stir up trouble between the Ebonies and the Caballeros, tells Buck about Lola's secret love affair with a member of the Royals, Jimmy Wallace. After Brooks and a black narcotics officer raid the party, Buck's cohort Muscles accuses Jimmy of calling the police, and they take him to a deserted railroad yard. There, Jimmy falls onto a spike as he struggles with Buck and Muscles, and when Jimmy dies, Buck leaves Manuel's necklace near the body. After arresting Manuel, Brooks interrogates Lola, who blames Buck and determines to obtain evidence against him. When Lola presents her side of the racial question in class, she emphasizes the loss to society when people do not allow others to function as equals. After class, when Don asks Buck if he can join the Royals, and Buck sends Muscles to fight him at an abandoned lot. During the fight, Don convinces Muscles, who is unhappy with Buck, to join him in a drug deal. Frank trails Lola to a doctor's office, and when she leaves dejectedly, he tends to her and surmises that she is pregnant. Meanwhile, Buck has given Satchel's little brother George and his friends some marijuana cigarettes. When Frank and Lola find George, sick from the drugs, Frank carries him to Satchel. In back of Gabby's Grill, the Royals' hangout, Buck and his gang interrogate one of the Ebonies responsible for the attack on Buck and Wiggles. When the captive retorts that Wiggles is black, Buck becomes enraged. He rips open the gang member's shirt, slops white paint over him and declares that they are "integrating" him. Later, Buck insults Wiggles, and after she becomes hysterical, he propositions Lola in front of her. Lola accepts and the gang go to a party at the home of Winnie, a rich boy who is trying get into the gang. At the party, Buck attempts to take Lola into a bedroom, but is interrupted when Elliott arrives. Meanwhile, Lola's little brother Rudy, who has learned she is in trouble, is stopped by George when he runs through the black neighborhood on his way to ask the Caballeros for help. Upon learning that Rudy is trying to help Lola, George tells Satchel, who gathers together the Ebonies. Meanwhile, Manuel, who has been released from jail, assembles the Caballeros. After Elliott sells drugs to Buck, he privately meets with Muscles and Don and agrees to return with more drugs for them to buy. Frank, who has learned Winnie's address from Wiggles, sneaks in a window and tries to get Lola to leave. When Papa, who has tracked down Lola after learning of her pregnancy, arrives, Lola confesses it is Jimmy's baby and accuses Buck of murdering him. Buck, however, blames Muscles, and as Muscles runs out, Don identifies himself as a police officer. As Elliott returns carrying a gun, the black and Mexican gangs arrive and agree to fight together against the Royals. Brooks and the narcotics officer then arrive and break up the brawl. While the officer is capturing Elliott, Frank throws Buck through a window, then bandages his injuries. After Brooks castigates the gang for not considering members of other races as human beings, Frank takes Lola home and they admit that they need each other. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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