Apache Country (1952)

61-62 mins | Western | May 1952

Director:

George Archainbaud

Writer:

Norman S. Hall

Producer:

Armand Schaefer

Cinematographer:

Bill Bradford

Editor:

James Sweeney

Production Designer:

Charles Clague

Production Company:

Gene Autry Productions
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HISTORY

In the film, a group of Jemez Pueblo Apache Indians performs a war dance, an eagle dance and a buffalo dance while Gene Autry's character comments on the significance of the ... More Less

In the film, a group of Jemez Pueblo Apache Indians performs a war dance, an eagle dance and a buffalo dance while Gene Autry's character comments on the significance of the dancing. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
24 May 1952.
---
Daily Variety
14 May 52
p. 6.
Film Daily
29 May 52
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 1951
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Nov 1951
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
14 May 52
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
24 May 52
p. 1374.
The Exhibitor
4 Jun 52
p. 3305.
Variety
21 May 52
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
Mus supv
SOUND
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Covered Wagon Rolled Right Along," words and music by Britt Wood and Hy Heath
"Crime Will Never Pay," words and music by Willard Robinson and Jack Pepper
"I Love to Yodel," words and music by Carolina Cotton
+
SONGS
"The Covered Wagon Rolled Right Along," words and music by Britt Wood and Hy Heath
"Crime Will Never Pay," words and music by Willard Robinson and Jack Pepper
"I Love to Yodel," words and music by Carolina Cotton
"Cold, Cold Heart," words and music by Hank Williams.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
May 1952
Production Date:
11 November--20 November 1951
Copyright Claimant:
Gene Autry Productions
Copyright Date:
7 April 1952
Copyright Number:
LP1625
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
61-62
Length(in feet):
5,571
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When a rash of Indian raids plagues the Southwest territory, Gene Autry, chief scout for the Southwest Cavalry Command, is summoned to Washington, D.C. to meet with Commissioner Lathan of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Lathan orders Gene to resign his post so that he can conduct an undercover investigation of the raids. Outside Lathan's office, Bartlett, the commisioner's secretary is conspiring with Laura Rayburn, the daughter of Apache Springs Indian Agent Walter Rayburn, and her fiancé, Dave Kilrain, to sabotage Gene's mission. After ostensibly resigning his post to go into ranching, Gene, accompanied by his friend, Pat Buttram, travels to Junction City and is about to board the stage bound for Apache Springs when Laura, a passenger on the stage, feigns a fear of guns and begs the men to remove theirs. After Gene and Pat oblige Laura and hand their guns over to the stage driver, Carolina Cotton, the sharpshooting proprietor of a medicine show, also boards the stage. Along the trail, Kilrain and his road agents wait for Laura's signal to attack the stage, thinking that Gene and Pat have been disarmed. When the outlaws appear, Gene and Pat extract their pistols from the lunch boxes in which they were hidden and start firing, sending Kilrain and his gang scurrying for cover. When the stage reaches Apache Springs, Laura reports to her father and Kilrain. The three have been inciting the Indians by providing them with liquor and guns, and the resulting raids have kept the Cavalry occupied, thus allowing the railroad bandits free reign of the territory. Laura warns Kilrain that Carolina, a friend of the Indians performing in her show, may endanger their operation ... +


When a rash of Indian raids plagues the Southwest territory, Gene Autry, chief scout for the Southwest Cavalry Command, is summoned to Washington, D.C. to meet with Commissioner Lathan of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Lathan orders Gene to resign his post so that he can conduct an undercover investigation of the raids. Outside Lathan's office, Bartlett, the commisioner's secretary is conspiring with Laura Rayburn, the daughter of Apache Springs Indian Agent Walter Rayburn, and her fiancé, Dave Kilrain, to sabotage Gene's mission. After ostensibly resigning his post to go into ranching, Gene, accompanied by his friend, Pat Buttram, travels to Junction City and is about to board the stage bound for Apache Springs when Laura, a passenger on the stage, feigns a fear of guns and begs the men to remove theirs. After Gene and Pat oblige Laura and hand their guns over to the stage driver, Carolina Cotton, the sharpshooting proprietor of a medicine show, also boards the stage. Along the trail, Kilrain and his road agents wait for Laura's signal to attack the stage, thinking that Gene and Pat have been disarmed. When the outlaws appear, Gene and Pat extract their pistols from the lunch boxes in which they were hidden and start firing, sending Kilrain and his gang scurrying for cover. When the stage reaches Apache Springs, Laura reports to her father and Kilrain. The three have been inciting the Indians by providing them with liquor and guns, and the resulting raids have kept the Cavalry occupied, thus allowing the railroad bandits free reign of the territory. Laura warns Kilrain that Carolina, a friend of the Indians performing in her show, may endanger their operation and should be eliminated. After Kilrain disrupts the medicine show that evening, Carolina informs Gene that Kilrain is the leader of the bandit underground that has been engineering the Indian raids. The next day, Gene, posing as a would-be land buyer, visits Rayburn, who is also the government land agent. When Rayburn sends Gene and Pat to look at property in the isolated Bear Valley, Gene, anticipating an ambush, covers their horses' hooves with canvas bags, thereby covering their tracks and making it impossible for Rayburn's men to follow them. Doubling back to town, Pat and Gene listen outside Kilrain's office as Kilrain confers with notorious outlaw Tom Ringo about a railroad robbery. Bursting into the office, Gene and Pat arrest Kilrain, but he is soon released for lack of evidence. The next day, Carolina joins the wagon train bound for Fort Ballard, and Gene hands her a coded message to deliver to the commandant there. Witnessing the exchange, Rayburn and Kilrain decide to attack the wagon train and destroy the message. Soon after Carolina departs, Gene receives a message from Lathan, warning him that Bartlett has divulged the code to Rayburn. Realizing that Carolina is in danger, Gene and Pat gallop after the wagon train, arriving just in time to join Carolina in fending off Kilrain's attack. After Carolina wounds both Kilrain and Rayburn, the bandit ring is smashed, and Gene, Pat and Carolina travel to Washington to be commended for their heroic efforts. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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