The Oklahoman (1957)

80 mins | Western | 19 May 1957

Director:

Francis D. Lyon

Producer:

Walter Mirisch

Cinematographer:

Carl Guthrie

Editor:

George White

Production Designer:

David Milton

Production Company:

Allied Artists Pictures Corp.
Full page view
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
27 Apr 1957.
---
Daily Variety
19 Apr 57
p. 3.
Film Daily
25 Apr 57
p. 6.
Harrison's Reports
20 Apr 57
p. 63.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Mar 1957
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
18 May 56
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 56
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Apr 57
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
27 Apr 57
p. 354.
New York Times
15 May 57
p. 39.
The Exhibitor
26 Jun 57
p. 4341.
Variety
1 May 57
p. 7.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Const supv
Props
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
Mus ed
SOUND
Rec eng
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hair styles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 May 1957
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Oklahoma City, OK: 18 April 1957
New York opening: 14 May 1957
Production Date:
mid May to early June 1956
Copyright Claimant:
Allied Artists Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
30 April 1957
Copyright Number:
LP8213
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
80
Length(in feet):
7,198
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1870, after his wife Louise dies in childbirth on the way to California, Dr. John Brighton decides to remain in the nearby town of Cherokee Wells in the Oklahoma Territory with his newly born daughter, whom he names after her mother. Five years later, the Brightons are settled at the home of elderly widow Mrs. Fitzgerald, who is helping to rear Louise. Cherokee Wells is generally a peaceful town, but wealthy rancher Cass Dobie and his brother Mel will stop at nothing to get their own way. One day, John is visited by Charlie Smith, an Indian, whose son Little Charlie developed a stomachache after drinking some swamp water. Noticing that Charlie's eighteen-year-old daughter Maria is good with children, Mrs. Fitzgerald hires her to care for the energetic Louise. Afterward, John visits the ranch of widow Anne Barnes and her mother, Mrs. Waynebrook, who invites John, Mrs. Fitzgerald, Louise and Maria to attend her sixtieth birthday party. Later, Mrs. Fitzgerald dies after suffering a stroke and, when Maria stays on to care for Louise, the townspeople begin to gossip about the relationship between John and Maria. Dobie, meanwhile, has secretly discovered oil on Charlie's land and offers to buy the land. When Charlie refuses, Dobie threatens him. During Mrs. Waynebrook's party, Mel sneaks onto Charlie's land to get a sample of the oil. Charlie discovers him, and when Mel shoots at him, Charlie kills him in self-defense. Dobie's men interrupt the party to announce that Charlie has given himself up to the sheriff, pleading self-defense. Anne begs John not to get involved in the quarrel, but believing that Charlie will ... +


In 1870, after his wife Louise dies in childbirth on the way to California, Dr. John Brighton decides to remain in the nearby town of Cherokee Wells in the Oklahoma Territory with his newly born daughter, whom he names after her mother. Five years later, the Brightons are settled at the home of elderly widow Mrs. Fitzgerald, who is helping to rear Louise. Cherokee Wells is generally a peaceful town, but wealthy rancher Cass Dobie and his brother Mel will stop at nothing to get their own way. One day, John is visited by Charlie Smith, an Indian, whose son Little Charlie developed a stomachache after drinking some swamp water. Noticing that Charlie's eighteen-year-old daughter Maria is good with children, Mrs. Fitzgerald hires her to care for the energetic Louise. Afterward, John visits the ranch of widow Anne Barnes and her mother, Mrs. Waynebrook, who invites John, Mrs. Fitzgerald, Louise and Maria to attend her sixtieth birthday party. Later, Mrs. Fitzgerald dies after suffering a stroke and, when Maria stays on to care for Louise, the townspeople begin to gossip about the relationship between John and Maria. Dobie, meanwhile, has secretly discovered oil on Charlie's land and offers to buy the land. When Charlie refuses, Dobie threatens him. During Mrs. Waynebrook's party, Mel sneaks onto Charlie's land to get a sample of the oil. Charlie discovers him, and when Mel shoots at him, Charlie kills him in self-defense. Dobie's men interrupt the party to announce that Charlie has given himself up to the sheriff, pleading self-defense. Anne begs John not to get involved in the quarrel, but believing that Charlie will not get a fair trial, John comes to his defense. Because of John's intervention, Charlie is allowed to return home, and his fellow Indians set up a guard on his property. That evening, to John's surprise, Maria announces that she is in love with him. The following day, John defends her against Dobie, thus making an enemy of the rancher. Then, while John is on his way to Oklahoma City to fetch an Indian agent to attend the inquest, his horse is killed by Dobie. John walks to Anne's ranch and together, they check on Charlie. John begins to suspect that Dobie did not intend to kill him, but rather wanted to stop him from reaching the Indian agent. When Little Charlie shows John the jar of water Mel was collecting from the swamp, he realizes that the swamp is full of petroleum. The next morning, John, Anne and Charlie ride into town for the inquest. John tells the marshal and the townspeople about the oil. The marshal reports that Mel's gun had been fired, confirming Charlie's claims of self-defense. Dobie then calls John a liar and in the ensuing gunfight, Dobie is killed and John is wounded. Realizing that Anne and John are in love, Maria tells Anne that she will return to her father. When he recovers, John proposes to Anne, to the delight of her mother. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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