Tomahawk Trail (1957)

60-61 mins | Western | February 1957

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Mark of the Apache . Although the FD review credits Robert Parry as director, Lesley Selander is listed in the onscreen credits and in all other sources. Tomahawk Trail marked the screen debut of Harry Dean Stanton, who is billed onscreen as "Dean ... More Less

The working title of this film was Mark of the Apache . Although the FD review credits Robert Parry as director, Lesley Selander is listed in the onscreen credits and in all other sources. Tomahawk Trail marked the screen debut of Harry Dean Stanton, who is billed onscreen as "Dean Stanton." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
12 Jan 1957.
---
Daily Variety
26 Dec 56
p. 3.
Film Daily
3 Jan 57
p. 5.
Harrison's Reports
29 Dec 56
p. 208.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jun 56
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Dec 56
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
5 Jan 57
p. 210.
The Exhibitor
26 Dec 56
p. 4270.
Variety
2 Jan 57
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Operations cam
Key grip
Lighting tech
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Photog eff
Photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstyles
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Mark of the Apache
Release Date:
February 1957
Premiere Information:
San Francisco opening: 21 December 1956
Production Date:
mid May--early June 1956
Copyright Claimant:
Sunrise Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
21 December 1956
Copyright Number:
LP7626
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
60-61
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18187
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

During a U.S. Cavalry patrol mission to Ft. Bowie, Lt. Jonathan Davenport, the newly appointed West Point-trained commander of the troop, clashes with his second-in-command, Sgt. Wade McCoy, a seasoned veteran of the "tomahawk trail." Davenport, ignorant of the ways of the West, cloaks his weakness with a mask of arrogance and contempt. Due to Davenport's misjudgment, the platoon loses its ammunition and supply wagons during an attack by the Apache Indians. That night, the Indians return and steal the troop's horses, forcing the men to proceed on foot through the desert to Ft. Bowie. The men resent Davenport's incompetence and his condescending attitude, and tensions mount when Davenport accuses McCoy of cowardice because of his constant criticisms. Suffering from sunstroke, Davenport then collapses. Aroused by the sound of rifle fire in the distance, signaling that Fort Bowie is under attack, Davenport orders his men to shoot on sight, despite McCoy's protests. Continuing on, the troop is drawn into a skirmish with a band of Indians, and after driving off the braves, they capture two young women. One is Ellen Carter, the daughter of the commander of Fort Defiance, who was taken prisoner by the Indians after a massacre at the fort. The other is Tula, the daughter of Victorio, the chief of the Apaches. When Davenport, raving from the heat, accuses Ellen of being an Apache squaw and orders both women bound, McCoy rebels and assumes command. That night, Pvt. Barrow, one of the enlistees, attacks Tula, and the sergeant comes to her aid, thus earning Barrow's emnity. Throughout the assault, Tula remains silent, having promised McCoy that she would ... +


During a U.S. Cavalry patrol mission to Ft. Bowie, Lt. Jonathan Davenport, the newly appointed West Point-trained commander of the troop, clashes with his second-in-command, Sgt. Wade McCoy, a seasoned veteran of the "tomahawk trail." Davenport, ignorant of the ways of the West, cloaks his weakness with a mask of arrogance and contempt. Due to Davenport's misjudgment, the platoon loses its ammunition and supply wagons during an attack by the Apache Indians. That night, the Indians return and steal the troop's horses, forcing the men to proceed on foot through the desert to Ft. Bowie. The men resent Davenport's incompetence and his condescending attitude, and tensions mount when Davenport accuses McCoy of cowardice because of his constant criticisms. Suffering from sunstroke, Davenport then collapses. Aroused by the sound of rifle fire in the distance, signaling that Fort Bowie is under attack, Davenport orders his men to shoot on sight, despite McCoy's protests. Continuing on, the troop is drawn into a skirmish with a band of Indians, and after driving off the braves, they capture two young women. One is Ellen Carter, the daughter of the commander of Fort Defiance, who was taken prisoner by the Indians after a massacre at the fort. The other is Tula, the daughter of Victorio, the chief of the Apaches. When Davenport, raving from the heat, accuses Ellen of being an Apache squaw and orders both women bound, McCoy rebels and assumes command. That night, Pvt. Barrow, one of the enlistees, attacks Tula, and the sergeant comes to her aid, thus earning Barrow's emnity. Throughout the assault, Tula remains silent, having promised McCoy that she would not cry out and alert the Indians. On the trek back to the fort, Davenport begins to regain his equilibrium, causing McCoy to fear a court-martial, but McCoy's friend, Pvt. Reynolds, assures him that he has done the right thing. Upon reaching Ft. Bowie, the patrol discovers that the garrison has been massacred. Davenport, raving once again, addresses the dead commander and then collapses, and Miller, his orderly, blames McCoy for his superior's condition. After first issuing orders to continue to Fort Benson, McCoy decides to stay and secure the fort. That night, as Apache drums drone in the distance, Barrow assaults Ellen and she kills him while protecting herself. Later, Ellen confides to Tula that she has fallen in love with McCoy and implores her to plead with her father to end the warfare. Soon after, a band of Indians attack and fell Davenport with an arrow. After McCoy and his men drive off the first wave of Indians, Johnny Dogwood, the troop's scout, listens to the drums and warns that the braves have told Victorio that Tula has defected to the white man. Tula decides to risk her life to meet with her father. As soon as she climbs the fort wall, she is captured by two braves, who take her to Victorio. After hugging his daughter, Victorio calls off the attack and the Indians ride away. Miller then promises to support McCoy at the inquiry, and Ellen and McCoy embrace in relief. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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