Oklahoma Territory (1960)

66-67 mins | Western | 22 August 1960

Director:

Edward L. Cahn

Writer:

Orville Hampton

Producer:

Robert E. Kent

Cinematographer:

Walter Strenge

Editor:

Michael Minth

Production Designer:

Bill Glasgow

Production Company:

Premium Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to a Jul 1959 HR news item, Adele Mara was originally to play the role of "Ruth Red Hawk," but had to withdraw due to a scheduling conflict. Although HR news items place Tom Brown Henry , Hal Torey, Charles Stevens, Boyd Red Morgan , George Barrows, Kenne Duncan, Jack Kenney , Eddie Little Sky, Bob Woodward and Paul Bradley in the cast, their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. ... More Less

According to a Jul 1959 HR news item, Adele Mara was originally to play the role of "Ruth Red Hawk," but had to withdraw due to a scheduling conflict. Although HR news items place Tom Brown Henry , Hal Torey, Charles Stevens, Boyd Red Morgan , George Barrows, Kenne Duncan, Jack Kenney , Eddie Little Sky, Bob Woodward and Paul Bradley in the cast, their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
22 Feb 1960.
---
Daily Variety
10 Feb 60
p. 3.
Film Daily
17 Feb 60
p. 45.
Filmfacts
1960
p. 17.
Harrison's Reports
13 Feb 60
p. 26.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Feb 60
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jul 59
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jul 1959
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jul 1959
p. 10, 15.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jul 1959
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jul 1959
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 1959
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
27 Feb 60
p. 603.
The Exhibitor
17 Feb 60
p. 4678.
Variety
10 Feb 60
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Chief tech
Cam op
Asst cam
Asst cam
Still photog
Gaffer
Best boy
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Supv ed
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Props
COSTUMES
Ward man
Ward woman
MUSIC
Mus ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Casting dir
Casting
Scr supv
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 August 1960
Production Date:
began 15 July 1959 at Paramount-Sunset Studios
Copyright Claimant:
Premium Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
17 December 1959
Copyright Number:
LP15664
Physical Properties:
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Duration(in mins):
66-67
Length(in feet):
6,007
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
19441
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1872, the Oklahoma territory is simmering with tensions between the Indians and the white people. While out riding one day, Temple Houston, the district attorney of Fort Smith and the son of Sam Houston, sees a band of white riders attack a group of Indians. When Temple intervenes, one of the white assailants claims that he and his posse have been deputized to arrest Buffalo Horn, the chief of the Cherokees, for the murder of Indian Commissioner Allen Barbee. Although Temple is Buffalo Horn's friend, he has no choice but to uphold the law and arrest the chief. In the town of Fort Smith, meanwhile, Bigelow, an agent for the railroad, instructs Larkin, the gunfighter he hired to murder Barbee and frame Buffalo Horn, to arrange for the chief's death. Upon delivering Buffalo Horn to Marshal Pete Rosslyn's jail, Temple is beseeched by Ruth Red Hawk, the chief's daughter and Temple's sweetheart, to release her father. When Temple refuses, Ruth warns of an impending war with the Indians. Soon after, a lynch mob led by Larkin storms the jail, but Rosslyn and Temple disperse the crowd with gunfire. A review of the evidence against Buffalo Horn reveals an airtight case: Barbee was killed with the chief's knife and an eyewitness, Tom Badger, has sworn that he saw Buffalo Horn stab Barbee. Although he admits to having argued with Barbee over the commissioner's plan to disperse jointly held tribal lands to individual Indians, Buffalo Horn swears that he never harmed Barbee and that he spent the night of the murder with a family of white settlers named Lindstrom. When Rosslyn counters that the ... +


In 1872, the Oklahoma territory is simmering with tensions between the Indians and the white people. While out riding one day, Temple Houston, the district attorney of Fort Smith and the son of Sam Houston, sees a band of white riders attack a group of Indians. When Temple intervenes, one of the white assailants claims that he and his posse have been deputized to arrest Buffalo Horn, the chief of the Cherokees, for the murder of Indian Commissioner Allen Barbee. Although Temple is Buffalo Horn's friend, he has no choice but to uphold the law and arrest the chief. In the town of Fort Smith, meanwhile, Bigelow, an agent for the railroad, instructs Larkin, the gunfighter he hired to murder Barbee and frame Buffalo Horn, to arrange for the chief's death. Upon delivering Buffalo Horn to Marshal Pete Rosslyn's jail, Temple is beseeched by Ruth Red Hawk, the chief's daughter and Temple's sweetheart, to release her father. When Temple refuses, Ruth warns of an impending war with the Indians. Soon after, a lynch mob led by Larkin storms the jail, but Rosslyn and Temple disperse the crowd with gunfire. A review of the evidence against Buffalo Horn reveals an airtight case: Barbee was killed with the chief's knife and an eyewitness, Tom Badger, has sworn that he saw Buffalo Horn stab Barbee. Although he admits to having argued with Barbee over the commissioner's plan to disperse jointly held tribal lands to individual Indians, Buffalo Horn swears that he never harmed Barbee and that he spent the night of the murder with a family of white settlers named Lindstrom. When Rosslyn counters that the settlers have denied Buffalo Horn's alibi, Temple rides to Barbee's house to conduct his own investigation. There, he finds Barbee's journal and discovers that the commissioner had made plans to travel to Washington, D.C. to present his proposal, thus strengthening Buffalo Horn's motive for murder. Next, Temple rides to the Cherokee reservation to confer with Sparrow Hawk, Buffalo Horn's hot-tempered son. Sparrow Hawk, spoiling for war, orders Temple beaten and dumped on the marshal's doorstep. Although Buffalo Horn continues to protest his innocence, Temple refuses to believe his old friend. As the date of the trial approaches, George Blackwell, a political power in the territory, comes to town, summoned by Bigelow. Hoping to influence Temple, Bigelow proposes that Blackwell offer the district attorney the position of governor if he wins a conviction, but Temple postpones his decision until after the trial. At the trial, Temple exhibits the overwhelming evidence against Buffalo Horn. When Ward Harlan, the editor of the local paper, overhears Blackwell's plan for using a guilty verdict to propel Temple to the governor's office, he pens an editorial against political corruption. After Buffalo Horn is found guilty and sentenced to hang, Ruth breaks off her relationship with Temple, gallops out of town and dispatches three braves to search for the Lindstrom family. Harlan, meanwhile, informs Temple that under an 1867 treaty, the Cherokees must forfeit their lands to the railroad if they go to war. Sensing a link between Bigelow and the chain of pat evidence against Buffalo Horn, Temple decides to reopen his investigation. When Ruth reports that the Lindstrom family has been found and will testify in her father's defense, Temple tricks Badger, the eyewitness, into revealing that his eyesight is failing. Before Badger can be deposed, however, Larkin shoots him. Upon discovering that Baily, the man who refuted Buffalo Horn's testimony about spending the night with the Lindstroms, had been bribed by Badger, Temple decides to reopen the trial. Bigelow, however, learns that the Lindstroms have been located and arranges for Buffalo Horn's execution to be moved up before the Lindstroms can reach town. To save his friend's life, Temple breaks him out of jail. At the new hearing, Temple announces that he is now acting as Buffalo Horn's attorney and calls the Lindstroms to the stand. After the Lindstroms confirm the chief's alibi, Temple is about to denounce Larkin and Bigelow when Larkin stands and fires at Temple, who ducks and shoots Larkin. After Rosslyn arrests Bigelow, Buffalo Horn is exonerated of all charges, and Temple and Ruth reconcile. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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