Five Guns to Tombstone (1961)

71 mins | Western | January 1961

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HISTORY

Although the onscreen credits include a copyright statement for Zenith Pictures, Inc., the film was not registered for copyright.
       Five Guns to Tombstone was announced in a 23 Jun 1960 DV item as an upcoming film to be produced by Edward Smalls’s Zenith Pictures, Inc., for release by United Artists Corp. Principal photography began on 12 Jul 1960, as announced three days later in DV, with shooting based at Samuel Goldwyn Studios in Hollywood, CA.
       Irving Berlin was listed as editor in onscreen credits, although Bernard Small had been credited in production charts in Jul 1960 issues of HR and DV. The 10 Mar 1961 DV published an apology for incorrectly identifying Small as the editor in its 8 Mar 1961 review.
       Although Jul 1959 DV and HR news items add Jeff De Benning, Robert Ball, Willis Robards, Jerry Todd and Dick Wilson to the cast, their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Modern sources also add actors Boyd Stockman, Al Wyatt and Bob Woodward to the ... More Less

Although the onscreen credits include a copyright statement for Zenith Pictures, Inc., the film was not registered for copyright.
       Five Guns to Tombstone was announced in a 23 Jun 1960 DV item as an upcoming film to be produced by Edward Smalls’s Zenith Pictures, Inc., for release by United Artists Corp. Principal photography began on 12 Jul 1960, as announced three days later in DV, with shooting based at Samuel Goldwyn Studios in Hollywood, CA.
       Irving Berlin was listed as editor in onscreen credits, although Bernard Small had been credited in production charts in Jul 1960 issues of HR and DV. The 10 Mar 1961 DV published an apology for incorrectly identifying Small as the editor in its 8 Mar 1961 review.
       Although Jul 1959 DV and HR news items add Jeff De Benning, Robert Ball, Willis Robards, Jerry Todd and Dick Wilson to the cast, their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Modern sources also add actors Boyd Stockman, Al Wyatt and Bob Woodward to the cast. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
23 Jun 1960
p. 3.
Daily Variety
5 Jul 1960
p. 1, 4.
Daily Variety
6 Jul 1960
p. 2.
Daily Variety
15 Jul 1960
p. 7.
Daily Variety
18 Jul 1960
p. 11.
Daily Variety
4 Jan 1961
p. 4.
Daily Variety
8 Mar 1961
p. 3.
Daily Variety
10 Mar 1961
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jul 1960
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jul 1960
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jul 1960
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jul 1960
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Mar 1961.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Mar 1961.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
11 Mar 1961.
---
Variety
8 Mar 1961.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
COSTUMES
Ward man
Ward woman
MUSIC
Mus ed
SOUND
Eff ed
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Casting dir
Scr supv
Chief tech
DETAILS
Release Date:
January 1961
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 28 December 1960
Production Date:
began 12 July 1960
Physical Properties:
Sound
Ryder Sound Services
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
71
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
19731
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Tombstone, outlaw Ike Garvey enrages businessman George Landon by demanding seventy percent of his profits. In retaliation, Landon directs his henchmen, Mel Dixon, Rusty Kolloway and Hoke, to break Matt Wade out of prison and bring him to their hideout at the Snakeskin Mine. There, Landon informs Matt that he can earn half a million dollars robbing a Wells Fargo stage, but only if he can convince his brother Billy, a brilliant, reformed outlaw, to join them. Billy currently lives on a struggling ranch with Matt’s teenage son Ted, and has just learned that he must sell his herd to pay off the ranch loan, which will leave them penniless once again. Despite the bad news, Billy’s fiancée, Arlene, wants to wed the next Sunday, and offers to sell her shop to help pay off the debt. At the ranch, Matt has arrived and embraced Ted, who is thrilled to see his father. When Billy refuses to become embroiled in the robbery, Ted, convinced that breaking the law is the only way to save his father, agrees to join Matt. Matt returns to the mine and informs the others that he plans to follow Billy the next morning when he goes to the bank to repay his loan, then rob the bank and frame Billy, forcing him to join them. In the morning, they carry out their plan and bring Billy to the mine, where Ted is waiting. Out of eyesight of Ted and the gang, Billy punches Matt, and as they struggle, Matt’s gun discharges, killing him. Ted runs over and, assuming Billy has murdered his father, vows vengeance. Billy returns to town to clear his name ... +


In Tombstone, outlaw Ike Garvey enrages businessman George Landon by demanding seventy percent of his profits. In retaliation, Landon directs his henchmen, Mel Dixon, Rusty Kolloway and Hoke, to break Matt Wade out of prison and bring him to their hideout at the Snakeskin Mine. There, Landon informs Matt that he can earn half a million dollars robbing a Wells Fargo stage, but only if he can convince his brother Billy, a brilliant, reformed outlaw, to join them. Billy currently lives on a struggling ranch with Matt’s teenage son Ted, and has just learned that he must sell his herd to pay off the ranch loan, which will leave them penniless once again. Despite the bad news, Billy’s fiancée, Arlene, wants to wed the next Sunday, and offers to sell her shop to help pay off the debt. At the ranch, Matt has arrived and embraced Ted, who is thrilled to see his father. When Billy refuses to become embroiled in the robbery, Ted, convinced that breaking the law is the only way to save his father, agrees to join Matt. Matt returns to the mine and informs the others that he plans to follow Billy the next morning when he goes to the bank to repay his loan, then rob the bank and frame Billy, forcing him to join them. In the morning, they carry out their plan and bring Billy to the mine, where Ted is waiting. Out of eyesight of Ted and the gang, Billy punches Matt, and as they struggle, Matt’s gun discharges, killing him. Ted runs over and, assuming Billy has murdered his father, vows vengeance. Billy returns to town to clear his name of the robbery, but the townsmen, aware of his earlier criminal ways, assumes he is guilty and organize a lynch mob. Marshal Sam Jennings stops the mob from hanging Billy, but Billy, fearing he will not get a fair trial, flees. He visits Arlene, informing her that he must join the gang in order to gather evidence against them, and asks her to relate his plan to Jennings. Affecting a cruel, indifferent swagger, Billy goes to the mine and announces that he is now in charge, and hoping to extricate Ted, attempts to throw him out. However, Ted refuses to leave. Later, Landon explains to Billy that Garvey will rob the stage, after which Billy and his men will hijack and, preferably, kill Garvey. Billy then goes to Jennings, promising to deliver Garvey’s gang and the Wells Fargo payroll to Red Canyon the following day. Meanwhile, Ted visits the local saloon, where Garvey takes advantage of his anger by hiring him onto his gang. After learning from Ted that Landon has hired Billy, Garvey, realizing Landon wants him dead, shoots the businessman. Billy hears about the murder and, deducing that Garvey knows he is being set up, devises a new plan to join forces with Garvey in the robbery and trap him afterward. The next morning, he takes his gang to Garvey’s and convinces the outlaw to work together rather than engaging in an immediate shoot-out. On the trail, however, Garvey changes the original plan and demands that they rob the stage at a rest station. As Billy holds up the stage guards, Garvey instructs one of his men to grab the stage reins and take off. Billy manages to jump aboard and take control, but Garvey’s men follow and knock Billy off the stage. As Garvey unloads the payroll and flees into the hills, one of his men goes to Red Canyon to tell Jennings that Billy has joined Garvey and double-crossed the lawman. Soon, Garvey, Dixon, Kolloway and Hoke are attempting to steal each others’ portion of the payroll. In the confusion, Billy leaves his vest as a signal to Jennings and sneaks up behind the gang. A shootout ensues, during which Jennings, seeing the vest, hurries to join them. Garvey sends Ted to circle around behind Billy and murder him, but upon spotting his nephew, Billy counsels him that Garvey will soon kill him and take all the money. To prove this, Billy has Ted shoot into the ground, and as soon as Garvey hears the shot and assumes Billy is dead, he shoots at Ted. Billy grabs Ted out of harm’s way and pretends to be hit, which allows him and Ted to surprise the gang and gun down all but Garvey. Just then, Jennings arrives and arrests Garvey. Now aware that Billy was innocent all along, Jennings wishes him well with his upcoming wedding. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.