Foxes (1980)

R | 105 mins | Drama | 29 February 1980

Director:

Adrian Lyne

Writer:

Gerald Ayres

Cinematographer:

Leon Bijou

Editor:

Jim Coblentz

Production Designer:

Michel Levesque

Production Company:

PolyGram Pictures
Full page view
HISTORY

Opening credits include a title card for Gerry Hambling without listing a job title. Modern sources state that he was the film’s sound editor.
       End credits include the following statement: “The producers gratefully acknowledge the help of the following persons in the making of the picture: Peter Hollywood, Alan Bell, Hugh Strain, Noel Rogers, Bryan Tilling, James Marsh, Jacques Leroide, Bridget Reiss.” End credits also misspell the first name of musician Gregg Giuffria as “Greg.”
       Referring to the picture by its working title, Twentieth Century Foxes, a 27 Sep 1978 LAT article announced that principal photography was scheduled to begin 16 Oct 1978 with teen celebrities Jodie Foster and Scott Baio. The project began at Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp., where producer Gerald Ayers had decided to try his hand at screenwriting. According to Ayers, the narrative was inspired by the question: “What would happen if you dropped Louisa May Alcott into the San Fernando Valley today?” He believed that Alcott’s female protagonists in Little Women (Boston, 1868), “Meg,” “Jo,” “Beth,” and “Amy,” would have an entirely different experience of adolescence in 1970s suburbia. Fox decided to develop the property, but wanted to stay clear of the Alcott reference, believing it to be too austere and passé for its target audience. A 25 Feb 1980 HR article stated that Ayres spent five months researching the script at North Hollywood High School, where he interviewed teenagers.
       In Mar 1977, Ayers began the casting process by meeting with forty young actresses, and he finished a first draft of the screenplay by Nov 1977. He noted ... More Less

Opening credits include a title card for Gerry Hambling without listing a job title. Modern sources state that he was the film’s sound editor.
       End credits include the following statement: “The producers gratefully acknowledge the help of the following persons in the making of the picture: Peter Hollywood, Alan Bell, Hugh Strain, Noel Rogers, Bryan Tilling, James Marsh, Jacques Leroide, Bridget Reiss.” End credits also misspell the first name of musician Gregg Giuffria as “Greg.”
       Referring to the picture by its working title, Twentieth Century Foxes, a 27 Sep 1978 LAT article announced that principal photography was scheduled to begin 16 Oct 1978 with teen celebrities Jodie Foster and Scott Baio. The project began at Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp., where producer Gerald Ayers had decided to try his hand at screenwriting. According to Ayers, the narrative was inspired by the question: “What would happen if you dropped Louisa May Alcott into the San Fernando Valley today?” He believed that Alcott’s female protagonists in Little Women (Boston, 1868), “Meg,” “Jo,” “Beth,” and “Amy,” would have an entirely different experience of adolescence in 1970s suburbia. Fox decided to develop the property, but wanted to stay clear of the Alcott reference, believing it to be too austere and passé for its target audience. A 25 Feb 1980 HR article stated that Ayres spent five months researching the script at North Hollywood High School, where he interviewed teenagers.
       In Mar 1977, Ayers began the casting process by meeting with forty young actresses, and he finished a first draft of the screenplay by Nov 1977. He noted that his female lead characters were only suggested by Alcott’s Little Women, but as of late Sep 1978, he was still replicating their names in the script. By 27 Sep 1978, Fox had dropped the project.
       The property remained in limbo until midway through 1978, when British producer David Puttnam read the script and decided to move forward with the film. He told LAT that he became interested in the plight of teenagers when he first moved to the U.S., particularly privileged children who grew up in Beverly Hills, CA. As of 27 Sep 1978, Puttnam’s fellow British filmmaker, Adrian Lyne, had been hired to direct. The picture marked Lyne’s first theatrically-released feature film, as well as his first U.S. production. In addition, young actresses Marilyn Kagan, Kandice Stroh, and Cherie Currie made their starring role debuts in Foxes. At that time, Currie had already achieved notoriety as the lead singer of the all-female hard rock ‘n’ roll band, The Runaways.
       News items in the 4 Oct 1978 DV and 9 Oct 1978 HR referred to the movie as Ladies of the Valley and stated that “Casablanca Records & Filmworks” was set to produce. United Artists Corp. had already acquired distribution rights, and principal photography was still set to start on 16 Oct 1978.
       Var production charts on 11 Oct 1978 and 16 Oct 1978 listed the title as Twentieth Century Foxes, but two days after filming began, an 18 Oct 1978 Var production chart reverted to Ladies of the Valley. A 20 Dec 1978 Var article announced the upcoming release of Foxes, but one week later, on 27 Dec 1978, a final Var production chart still referred to the film as Ladies of the Valley. The Jan 1979 edition of Triad magazine noted the title had recently been shortened from Twentieth Century Foxes to Foxes.
       According to studio production notes in AMPAS library files, shooting began at Hollywood General Studios in Los Angeles, CA. After three weeks on the lot, the production moved to the San Fernando Valley the week of 6 Nov 1978. Locations included the Little Brown Church in Studio City, CA, and Valley Hospital in Van Nuys, CA, In Los Angeles, scenes were filmed at the Shrine Auditorium, Inglewood Park Cemetery, Hollywood High School, Lookout Mountain in Laurel Canyon, and a private home in Nichols Canyon.
       Casablanca Records & Filmworks was listed as the movie’s production company in all contemporary sources and reviews, but Polygram Pictures is credited onscreen. The only mention of Casablanca is in the music credits, which state that Casablanca Records & Tapes released the soundtrack album. The 1992 book Columbia Pictures: Portrait of a Studio explained that Peter Guber, Columbia Pictures’ executive vice president for worldwide production, left the studio in 1975 to become an independent producer and formed Filmworks one year later. To consolidate corporate interests, Guber brokered a merger with Casablanca Records. Renamed Casablanca Filmworks, the company planned to use Filmworks productions as vehicles for popular Casablanca musicians such as Donna Summer and the band “Angel,” which were both featured in Foxes. Casablanca Filmworks released several pictures, including The Deep (1977, see entry), which Guber produced, and Midnight Express (1978, see entry), which Guber executive produced for David Puttnam. After two years at Casablanca Filmworks, Guber resigned his presidency, but maintained his position as chairman of the board while Puttnam became the new studio head.
       By 1980, Casablanca Filmworks was struggling to remain viable and had only two pictures on its production schedule, The Hollywood Knights (1980, see entry) and Foxes. At that time, one of the world’s most lucrative music companies, Polygram, stepped in and purchased half of Casablanca Filmworks. The deal resulted in a friendship between Guber and Hollywood hairdresser Jon Peters, the alleged inspiration for actor Warren Beatty’s role in Shampoo (1975, see entry). Peters’s custom “blow-dry cut” was coveted by celebrities, and led to his role as Barbra Streisand’s manager and producer on her remake of A Star is Born (1976, see entry). Recognizing the market potential in his alliance with Peters, Guber deserted Casablanca Filmworks and partnered with his friend to form a motion picture division at Polygram. Foxes and The Hollywood Knights were therefore released as Polygram Pictures’ first productions.
       On 11 Feb 1980, HR announced a Los Angeles premiere on 26 Feb 1980 to raise money for the Free Arts Clinic, a non-profit organization that provided therapeutic services for abused children. According to a 28 Feb 1980 HR article, the screening grossed $30,000 for the clinic and was followed by NYC and Southern CA openings three days later, on 29 Feb 1980. The film was also shown on 25 Mar 1980 at the USA Film Festival in Dallas, TX. General release was initially scheduled for Mar 1980, but a 9 Apr 1980 Var news item announced that the picture was set to open at 520 theaters on 18 Apr 1980.
       Foxes grossed $140,568 at thirty venues its opening weekend in Los Angeles, NYC, Houston, TX, and Kansas City, MO, according to a 3 Mar 1980 Var news item. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
4 Oct 1978
p. 1.
Daily Variety
22 Feb 1980.
---
Daily Variety
29 Feb 1980
p. 3, 10.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Oct 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Feb 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Feb 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Feb 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Feb 1980
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Mar 1980.
---
Los Angeles Times
27 Sep 1978
Section IV, p. 14.
Los Angeles Times
29 Feb 1980
Section IV, p. 1.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
12 Mar 1980
p. 79.
New York Times
29 Feb 1980
Section III, p. 15.
New Yorker
29 Feb 1980
p. 92.
Newsweek
10 Mar 1980
p. 88.
The Village Voice
10 Mar 1980
p. 51.
Triad
Jan 1979.
p. 30.
Variety
11 Oct 1978.
---
Variety
16 Oct 1978.
---
Variety
18 Oct 1978.
---
Variety
20 Dec 1978.
---
Variety
27 Dec 1978.
---
Variety
27 Feb 1980
p. 21.
Variety
3 Mar 1980.
---
Variety
17 Mar 1980
p. 92.
Variety
9 Apr 1980.
---
Variety
20 Sep 1980.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Polygram Pictures production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
Asst cam
Asst cam
Key grip
Dolly grip
Stills photog
Gaffer
Best boy
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Const coord
Const foreman
Prop master
Set dresser
Leadman
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Orig mus comp and cond by
Mus arr and cond by
SOUND
[Sd ed]
Sd mixer
Dubbing mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Asst to the producers
Prod accountant
Prod accountant
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Unit pub
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Craft service
First aid
Studio teacher
Extras coord
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stuntman
COLOR PERSONNEL
[Col by]
SOURCES
SONGS
Vocal theme “Fly Too High,” lyrics by Janis Ian, music by Giorgio Moroder, performed by Janis Ian
“20th Century Foxes,” lyrics by Frank DiMino & Greg Giuffria, music by Frank DiMino & Greg Giuffria, performed by Angel
“Virginia,” lyrics by Punky Meadows, music by Punky Meadows, performed by Angel
+
SONGS
Vocal theme “Fly Too High,” lyrics by Janis Ian, music by Giorgio Moroder, performed by Janis Ian
“20th Century Foxes,” lyrics by Frank DiMino & Greg Giuffria, music by Frank DiMino & Greg Giuffria, performed by Angel
“Virginia,” lyrics by Punky Meadows, music by Punky Meadows, performed by Angel
“Rock & Roll Dancin’,” “That’s What I Like About My Baby,” lyrics by F. Beckmeier & S. Beckmeier
“More Than A Feeling,” lyrics by Donald T. Scholz, music by Donald T. Scholz, performed by Boston
“Shake It,” lyrics by Bruce Sudano, Joe Esposito & Eddie Hokenson, music by Giorgio Moroder, performed by Brooklyn Dreams
“Bad Love,” lyrics by Cher, music by Giorgio Moroder, performed by Cher
“Greedy Man,” lyrics by Keith Forsey, music by Giorgio Moroder & Keith Forsey, performed by Munich Machine
“Ship Of Fools,” lyrics by Bob Seger, music by Bob Seger, performed by Bob Seger
and, theme from “Foxes” – “On The Radio,” lyrics by Donna Summer, music by Giorgio Moroder, performed by Donna Summer.
+
PERFORMERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Ladies of the Valley
Twentieth Century Foxes
Release Date:
29 February 1980
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 26 February 1980
Los Angeles and New York openings: 29 February 1980
National release: 18 April 1980
Production Date:
began 16 October 1978 in Los Angeles, CA
Copyright Claimant:
United Artists Corporation
Copyright Date:
29 August 1980
Copyright Number:
PA78157
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
105
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
25691
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In North Hollywood, California, four teenage girls head to high school on a Friday morning: Madge Axman, a plumpish and bashful virgin; Deidre Thompkins, an oversexed vixen who wishes to manipulate boys with her budding sensuality; Annie Mallick, a runaway drug addict on probation for prostitution; and the even-headed Jeanie, who keeps her friends in line while dealing with her self-involved single mother, Mary, and absentee father, Bryan. As the foursome leave Jeanie’s apartment, Annie is pursued by her menacing, police officer father, Frank Mallick. Annie gets away, but when she is discovered absent from school, a counselor named Mr. Simmons questions Jeanie about her friend’s whereabouts. Jeanie remains mum and learns that Annie’s father wants to institutionalize his daughter. After school, Jeanie, Madge, and Deidre track Annie down in a seedy section of Hollywood Boulevard. Jeanie is intent on saving Annie from the sanitarium, and invites her friend to stay at her home. She drives to Annie’s house, gathers the girl’s belongings, and asks her catatonic mother, Gladys, to keep Annie’s location a secret. Later, Jeanie proposes that the girls use their divorced mothers’ child support incomes to rent an apartment of their own. That night, the young women go to the Shrine Auditorium in downtown Los Angeles, California, to see a performance by the “glam” rock ‘n’ roll band, Angel. Jeanie’s father, Bryan, is one of the band’s managers, and has provided tickets for his daughter’s friends, including Jeanie’s longtime boyfriend, Scott, and her skateboard-riding confidant, Brad, who is infatuated with Annie Mallick. Backstage, Jeanie asks her father to help finance her autonomous apartment with his child ... +


In North Hollywood, California, four teenage girls head to high school on a Friday morning: Madge Axman, a plumpish and bashful virgin; Deidre Thompkins, an oversexed vixen who wishes to manipulate boys with her budding sensuality; Annie Mallick, a runaway drug addict on probation for prostitution; and the even-headed Jeanie, who keeps her friends in line while dealing with her self-involved single mother, Mary, and absentee father, Bryan. As the foursome leave Jeanie’s apartment, Annie is pursued by her menacing, police officer father, Frank Mallick. Annie gets away, but when she is discovered absent from school, a counselor named Mr. Simmons questions Jeanie about her friend’s whereabouts. Jeanie remains mum and learns that Annie’s father wants to institutionalize his daughter. After school, Jeanie, Madge, and Deidre track Annie down in a seedy section of Hollywood Boulevard. Jeanie is intent on saving Annie from the sanitarium, and invites her friend to stay at her home. She drives to Annie’s house, gathers the girl’s belongings, and asks her catatonic mother, Gladys, to keep Annie’s location a secret. Later, Jeanie proposes that the girls use their divorced mothers’ child support incomes to rent an apartment of their own. That night, the young women go to the Shrine Auditorium in downtown Los Angeles, California, to see a performance by the “glam” rock ‘n’ roll band, Angel. Jeanie’s father, Bryan, is one of the band’s managers, and has provided tickets for his daughter’s friends, including Jeanie’s longtime boyfriend, Scott, and her skateboard-riding confidant, Brad, who is infatuated with Annie Mallick. Backstage, Jeanie asks her father to help finance her autonomous apartment with his child support pay, but Bryan fears he will violate the terms of his divorce, and promises to spend more time with his daughter in the future. After the concert, Madge Axman arrives home to prepare for a party, only to discover that her precocious younger sister, Sissie, has taken over the house with her pajama-clad friends. Madge’s tipsy mother, Mrs. Axman, promises Madge that she can still have the house to herself for the party. However, she embarrasses her daughter by forcing her to admit her virginity. Humiliated, Madge decides to cancel the event. She cries in her room as Sissie sends the partygoers away, declaring that her sister has never had sex. The next morning, Madge primps herself to see Jay, a much older admirer who lives nearby. Upon Madge’s suggestion, the two make love. As Jay leaves town for New York City, he declares his love and offers his home to Madge and her friends while he is away. There, the girls host a “private” dinner party that spirals out of control when throngs of uninvited guests arrive. A fight breaks out and the house is destroyed. At the police station, an officer telephones Jay and reports violence, narcotics, and stolen property, but Jay refuses to press charges. The four girls are held in custody until their parents pick them up, and Annie Mallick falls back into the clutches of her abusive father. At home, Jeanie sobs in fear that Annie’s impending hospitalization will irreparably harm her or provoke a suicide attempt. Jeanie’s mother, Mary, is disgusted by the behavior of her daughter’s friends. As the two argue, Jeanie complains about her mother’s one-night stands and her casual relationship with a divorcé named Sam. In the morning, Jeanie returns to Jay’s house and finds Madge asleep in the wreckage. Jay returns from New York City and Jeanie promises that she and her friends will earn enough money to repair the damage, but he does not believe the youngsters are capable of living up to the responsibility. While Jay yells at Madge Axman and threatens to beat her up, Jeanie slips away to find Brad. They commiserate about Annie Mallick, and Jeanie observes that people go to great lengths to numb their pain. Returning home, Jeanie receives a telephone call from Annie, who escaped the hospital after overdosing on psychiatric medications. When Jeanie and Brad rescue their near-comatose friend in Hollywood, they are harassed by one of Annie’s boyfriends. Riding his skateboard, Brad knocks the man through the glass wall of a liquor store and the friends speed away, unaware that the boyfriend and his gang are giving chase. As Annie kisses Brad and calls him a hero, Jeanie announces that her mother has moved out to live with Sam, and she now has the apartment to herself. She is willing to take care of Annie if the girl promises to get sober, finish high school, find a job, and pay back Jay, but Annie declares she is going to Oregon instead. Frustrated, Jeanie pulls over on a hillside overlooking the city and the girls wrestle until Annie claims she was kidding. Just then, Annie sees a police patrol car and runs away, fearing it is her father. When the officers agree to let Jeanie and Brad return home, Brad sneaks out of the truck to find Annie. Meanwhile, Annie’s boyfriend and his gang find Annie and speed after her in their car, but Brad distracts them and leads a chase on his skateboard. The hoodlums crash into a police car and Brad gets away. Alone and dazed, Annie tries to hitchhike back to North Hollywood. A surfer attempts to allure her with marijuana, but she refuses the drug and asks to be dropped off on the side of the road. While Annie tries to telephone Jeanie’s apartment from a pay phone, the call remains unanswered because Jeanie is back at the hilltop, looking for her friend. By the time Jeanie returns, the telephone is no longer ringing, and her mother, Mary, comes home for good. Back in the city, a sleek and intoxicated couple offers Annie a ride, hoping to seduce the girl, and they crash into the back of a truck. Annie’s friends and parents gather at the door of a hospital emergency room and watch from afar as the girl spits up blood and dies. Sometime later, the three surviving girl friends graduate, and Madge Axman and Jay get married. After the ceremony, Jeanie reconciles with her mother and brings the wedding flowers to Annie’s gravesite. There, she remembers a discussion they had about death. Annie wanted to be buried under a pear tree, so the roots would grow into her body and people could always taste her fruit. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.