Going Home (1971)

GP | 97-98 or 100 mins | Drama | November 1971

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HISTORY

According to Filmfacts , Going Home was shot on location in Wildwood, NJ and McKeesport, PA. A 29 Jul 1971 DV article stated that the bachelor party sequence in the "Graham" family home was shot at the Allegheny County Workhouse warden's house. The film marked the feature-film debut of actor Josh Mostel, son of actor Zero Mostel, and the feature-film directorial debut for television producer Herbert B. Leonard.
       An 8 Dec 1971 Var article noted that Leonard and the film's star, Robert Mitchum, complained about the final editing by then M-G-M president and chief executive officer James T. Aubrey, Jr., who did not give the film an opening campaign or any non-public previews. According to Filmfacts , Going Home , which was originally rated R, was quickly recut to gain a GP rating before its release. Aubrey cut twenty-one minutes from the film, including the role of actress Sylvia Miles, as a housewife involved with "Jimmy Graham"; several minutes from the rape scene; and one scene involving nudity. A modern source adds Parker McCormick to the cast. Going Home quickly closed after a brief unsuccessful ... More Less

According to Filmfacts , Going Home was shot on location in Wildwood, NJ and McKeesport, PA. A 29 Jul 1971 DV article stated that the bachelor party sequence in the "Graham" family home was shot at the Allegheny County Workhouse warden's house. The film marked the feature-film debut of actor Josh Mostel, son of actor Zero Mostel, and the feature-film directorial debut for television producer Herbert B. Leonard.
       An 8 Dec 1971 Var article noted that Leonard and the film's star, Robert Mitchum, complained about the final editing by then M-G-M president and chief executive officer James T. Aubrey, Jr., who did not give the film an opening campaign or any non-public previews. According to Filmfacts , Going Home , which was originally rated R, was quickly recut to gain a GP rating before its release. Aubrey cut twenty-one minutes from the film, including the role of actress Sylvia Miles, as a housewife involved with "Jimmy Graham"; several minutes from the rape scene; and one scene involving nudity. A modern source adds Parker McCormick to the cast. Going Home quickly closed after a brief unsuccessful release. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
5 Jul 1971.
---
Box Office
6 Dec 1971.
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Daily Variety
29 Jul 1971.
---
Daily Variety
17 Nov 1971
p. 3, 6.
Filmfacts
1971
pp. 674-77.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jun 1971.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jun 1971
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jun 1971.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jul 1971
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 1971
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Aug 1971
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Nov 1971.
---
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
18 Nov 1971.
---
Los Angeles Times
18 Nov 1971.
---
New York
18 Nov 1971.
---
New York Times
2 Dec 1971.
---
Newsweek
6 Dec 1971.
---
Time
13 Dec 1971.
---
Variety
24 Nov 1971
p. 16.
Variety
8 Dec 1971.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Herbert B. Leonard - Talbot Production
A Herbert B. Leonard--Talbot Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
COSTUMES
Ward supv
MUSIC
Mus scored and cond
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to the prod
Asst to the prod
Unit pub
STAND INS
Action scene coord by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Way Back Home in West Virginia," "The LaLa Song" and "You Never Know How Much," music and lyrics by Bill Walker
"Time After Time," music and lyrics by Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne
"Blue Moon," music and lyrics by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart
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SONGS
"Way Back Home in West Virginia," "The LaLa Song" and "You Never Know How Much," music and lyrics by Bill Walker
"Time After Time," music and lyrics by Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne
"Blue Moon," music and lyrics by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart
"Tell Me About Love," music and lyrics by Danny Vic, sung by Red Lane
"Silver Bird," music and lyrics by Red Lane, sung by Red Lane
"Rope Around the Wind" and "Singaree-Singaroh," music and lyrics by Red Lane and Harry Henley, sung by Red Lane.
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PERFORMER
DETAILS
Release Date:
November 1971
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 17 November 1971
Production Date:
16 June--late August 1971
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Copyright Date:
24 November 1971
Copyright Number:
LP40417
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Metrocolor
Duration(in mins):
97-98 or 100
MPAA Rating:
GP
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

One night, six-year-old Jimmy Graham wakes to find his mother dying of a knife wound inflicted by his father Harry. Due in part to Jimmy’s testimony, Harry is subsequently sentenced to fourteen years in prison for the murder, while Jimmy is sent to a series of reformatory institutions and foster homes where he is emotionally neglected. Years later, Jimmy, now nineteen years old and living in Pittsburgh, decides to visit Harry after having had no contact with him during the intervening years. However, when he reaches the prison with grand expectations of their first meeting, Jimmy finds that Harry was released months ago. Vengeful about his mother’s death, Jimmy travels to Wildwood, New Jersey to find his father, who is now working as a mechanic and living in a trailer court. While secretly watching Harry for several days, Jimmy reminisces about a beach picnic he and his parents took when he was a young boy. When Jimmy cried over the ugliness of battle scars on his father’s leg, Harry, a well-respected war hero, gently comforted and joked with his son until Jimmy’s fear was eased. In the present, Jimmy finally introduces himself to Harry outside the trailer one night, but his father is so shocked that he slams the door on him. However, Harry’s girl friend Jenny, who lives in a Winnebago nearby, encourages Harry to greet his son. Although congenial Jenny tries to ease the tension by fixing dinner for them and trying to make conversation, the two men remain nervously silent. Conflicted, Jimmy soon leaves, then files a police report against Harry, insisting that his father’s release is unjustified, but the presiding officer tells him Harry has ... +


One night, six-year-old Jimmy Graham wakes to find his mother dying of a knife wound inflicted by his father Harry. Due in part to Jimmy’s testimony, Harry is subsequently sentenced to fourteen years in prison for the murder, while Jimmy is sent to a series of reformatory institutions and foster homes where he is emotionally neglected. Years later, Jimmy, now nineteen years old and living in Pittsburgh, decides to visit Harry after having had no contact with him during the intervening years. However, when he reaches the prison with grand expectations of their first meeting, Jimmy finds that Harry was released months ago. Vengeful about his mother’s death, Jimmy travels to Wildwood, New Jersey to find his father, who is now working as a mechanic and living in a trailer court. While secretly watching Harry for several days, Jimmy reminisces about a beach picnic he and his parents took when he was a young boy. When Jimmy cried over the ugliness of battle scars on his father’s leg, Harry, a well-respected war hero, gently comforted and joked with his son until Jimmy’s fear was eased. In the present, Jimmy finally introduces himself to Harry outside the trailer one night, but his father is so shocked that he slams the door on him. However, Harry’s girl friend Jenny, who lives in a Winnebago nearby, encourages Harry to greet his son. Although congenial Jenny tries to ease the tension by fixing dinner for them and trying to make conversation, the two men remain nervously silent. Conflicted, Jimmy soon leaves, then files a police report against Harry, insisting that his father’s release is unjustified, but the presiding officer tells him Harry has completed his sentence and advises Jimmy to move on with his life. Jimmy returns to Harry, who offers him a place to stay and a job working alongside him as a mechanic. On the job, Harry tries to tell him stories about their shared past, but a sullen Jimmy childishly reacts by writing “beware of Harry Graham, who killed his wife” on the wall of a gas station bathroom on which they are working. Although Jimmy fantasizes that Harry will beat him with a crow bar when he sees the message, Harry remains silent after using the restroom later. Days later, Jimmy watches in a courtroom as Harry’s parole officer, Bonelli, who has access to his bank statements, reprimands him for not saving money and beginning a sexual relationship with Jenny. After Jimmy leaves, Bonelli warns Harry to keep the visit with his estranged son short. When an indignant Jimmy asks his father why he takes Bonelli’s abuse, Harry tells him that he acquiesces because he does not want his parole to be revoked. Later, Jimmy, assuming that Harry will come to Jenny’s rescue, reports to Harry that drunken sailors are harassing Jenny at the penny arcade where she works. Harry is unconcerned, prompting Jimmy to take matters in his own hands and hit one of the sailors. Soon a brawl ensues, forcing the rugged Harry to take action to save his son. After the sailors flee, a detached Harry casually looks at Jimmy’s wounds and walks away. Humiliated, Jimmy decides to leave Wildwood, but then loses his nerve and returns to Harry and Jenny. The couple, who are attempting to buy a house together, offer to give him a room after the purchase is completed. When the idea prompts only apathetic reluctance in the young man, Harry chastises his son for having no aspirations and only thinking of “broads.” Later, Harry and Jenny arrange for Jimmy to take their friend Betsy out on a date, with Harry and Jenny acting as casual chaperones. After seeing Jimmy easily befriend Betsy with his seductive moves on the dance floor, Harry and Jenny leave Jimmy the Winnebago keys so that the young couple can be alone. Although Betsy is eager to have sex, the inexperienced Jimmy nervously refuses. Days later, while shopping at a nursery with Jenny to buy plants for their new home, Jimmy pessimistically remarks that the parole board will never approve Harry and Jenny’s marriage or the house purchase and thus Jenny has no reason to buy plants to decorate it. Realizing Jimmy’s resentment remains impossible to resolve, Jenny tells him that he and his father can never normalize their relationship and suggests Jimmy leave. Angered, Jimmy storms up into an attic in the nursery where dozens of fighting cocks are caged. When Jenny follows him, Jimmy, sensing her fear of birds, rapes Jenny there. Later that day, an excited Harry returns home to tell Jenny that the parole board has approved their marriage, but finds his emotionally and physically bruised fiancée unresponsive. When she locks herself in the trailer bathroom, Harry, assuming Jenny is having second thoughts about his past, admits that he killed Jimmy’s mother and that he was wrong. Hearing his desperation, Jenny manically recites items needed for the reception to let him know she accepts the proposal. Meanwhile, Jimmy, still desperately believing that the past can be made right, returns to the house where the murder took place. Now a pizza parlor, Jimmy is refused entrance to the restaurant because a private bachelor party is in progress. After envisioning the image of his mother comforting him while they were living in the house, Jimmy calls Harry to tell him his location and apologize for “screwing up.” Hanging up the phone, Jimmy goes to the basement where he violently rips open cabinets hoping to find his mother’s belongings that he remembers being stored there, but discovers only restaurant supplies. Soon after, Harry arrives and listens as Jimmy wonders out loud if Jenny told Harry what he had done to her. Finally realizing that Jimmy raped Jenny, Harry gets Jimmy in a choke hold, but then releases him. As Harry gets in his car to leave, Jimmy asks why Harry killed his mother. Harry replies that he was drunk and did not mean to kill her, then offers to let Jimmy return home with him. After Jimmy makes a sarcastic remark and absent-mindedly asks what will happen in the future, Harry replies, “You get to be 20,” and leaves without him.


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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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