Heat (1972)

R | 100 mins | Satire | October 1972

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HISTORY

Although opening credits note that the flim was copyrighted in 1972 by the Score-Sarx Company, the Score-Sarx Company is not listed in copyright records. Paul Morrissey's onscreen credit reads "photographed and directed by." John Cale's music credit noted that the film's music was featured on the Warner-Reprise album "Academy in Peril."
       Filmfacts stated that the film was shot in two weeks in California and New York at a cost of $70,000 to produce. Parts of the picture were shot around the Los Feliz area of Los Angeles. The Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Ennis House can be seen in a background shot of "Sally Todd's" house. At the time of its release, reviews noted that Heat was rated X, but the MPAA gave it an R rating in 1973. Although Heat , which Filmfacts called "A Factory Film," was the first produced by noted artist, filmaker and Factory impressario Andy Warhol that was shot on the West Coast, a NYT news item noted that the scenes in Sally's bedroom were filmed at Warhol's house in East Hampton, NY. Heat marked the last motion picture appearance of actress Andrea Feldman, who committed suicide on 8 Aug 1972. Heat was the third in a trilogy of Warhol-produced films written, photographed and directed by Morrissey and starring Joe Dallesdandro. Many reviewers commented on the similarities between Heat and the 1950 Paramount film Sunset Blvd. (see below). ... More Less

Although opening credits note that the flim was copyrighted in 1972 by the Score-Sarx Company, the Score-Sarx Company is not listed in copyright records. Paul Morrissey's onscreen credit reads "photographed and directed by." John Cale's music credit noted that the film's music was featured on the Warner-Reprise album "Academy in Peril."
       Filmfacts stated that the film was shot in two weeks in California and New York at a cost of $70,000 to produce. Parts of the picture were shot around the Los Feliz area of Los Angeles. The Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Ennis House can be seen in a background shot of "Sally Todd's" house. At the time of its release, reviews noted that Heat was rated X, but the MPAA gave it an R rating in 1973. Although Heat , which Filmfacts called "A Factory Film," was the first produced by noted artist, filmaker and Factory impressario Andy Warhol that was shot on the West Coast, a NYT news item noted that the scenes in Sally's bedroom were filmed at Warhol's house in East Hampton, NY. Heat marked the last motion picture appearance of actress Andrea Feldman, who committed suicide on 8 Aug 1972. Heat was the third in a trilogy of Warhol-produced films written, photographed and directed by Morrissey and starring Joe Dallesdandro. Many reviewers commented on the similarities between Heat and the 1950 Paramount film Sunset Blvd. (see below). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
30 Oct 1972
p. 4536.
Filmfacts
1972
pp. 321-24.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Oct 1972.
---
Los Angeles Times
20 Oct 1972.
---
New York Times
31 Oct 1971.
---
New York Times
6 Oct 1972
p. 32.
Variety
21 Jun 1972
p. 18.
Variety
20 Oct 1972
Section II, p. 1.
DETAILS
Release Date:
October 1972
Premiere Information:
Cannes Film Festival screening: June 1972
New York Film Festival screening: 5 October 1972
Copyright Claimants:
Beta Film Co., limited partnership Seymour Frank & Sidney Sinetar, general partners
Copyright Dates:
6 October 1972 6 October 1972
Copyright Numbers:
LP41633 LP41633
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Eastman Color
Duration(in mins):
100
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Joe Davis, a former childhood television star who has not acted since his series The Big Ranch was cancelled, returns to Los Angeles and checks into a sleazy motel in the hope of jump-starting his career. At the pool, Joe meets Jessica Todd, the highly neurotic daughter of Sally Todd, an aging minor celebrity. Jessica, who lives at the motel with her infant son and lesbian lover Bonnie, launches into a tirade against her mother while adding that she has sworn off men and drugs for women and health food. When Lydia, the motel’s obese, slatternly manager, threatens to evict Jessica unless she pays her back rent, Jessica, who depends on her mother for financial support, asks Joe to join her that afternoon when she meets her mother to ask for money. Sally arrives soon after and is pleased to see Joe, with whom she once appeared on The Big Ranch . Critical of the environment in which her grandson is being reared, Sally rejects Jessica’s claim of being a lesbian, warning that “it would be bad for the columns.” Soon after Sally leaves, Lydia seduces Joe, and as she fondles him on her bed, promises to give him a discount for “paying his rent every night.” Their tryst is interrupted by Jessica, who runs in screaming in pain from the cigarette burns inflicted by her lover. Later, Jessica invites Joe to have lunch with her and her mother that afternoon at Sally’s mansion in the hills. Sally is upset at Joe’s unexpected appearance, and after Bonnie calls to inform Jessica that she is ... +


Joe Davis, a former childhood television star who has not acted since his series The Big Ranch was cancelled, returns to Los Angeles and checks into a sleazy motel in the hope of jump-starting his career. At the pool, Joe meets Jessica Todd, the highly neurotic daughter of Sally Todd, an aging minor celebrity. Jessica, who lives at the motel with her infant son and lesbian lover Bonnie, launches into a tirade against her mother while adding that she has sworn off men and drugs for women and health food. When Lydia, the motel’s obese, slatternly manager, threatens to evict Jessica unless she pays her back rent, Jessica, who depends on her mother for financial support, asks Joe to join her that afternoon when she meets her mother to ask for money. Sally arrives soon after and is pleased to see Joe, with whom she once appeared on The Big Ranch . Critical of the environment in which her grandson is being reared, Sally rejects Jessica’s claim of being a lesbian, warning that “it would be bad for the columns.” Soon after Sally leaves, Lydia seduces Joe, and as she fondles him on her bed, promises to give him a discount for “paying his rent every night.” Their tryst is interrupted by Jessica, who runs in screaming in pain from the cigarette burns inflicted by her lover. Later, Jessica invites Joe to have lunch with her and her mother that afternoon at Sally’s mansion in the hills. Sally is upset at Joe’s unexpected appearance, and after Bonnie calls to inform Jessica that she is going to commit suicide, Jessica rushes back to the motel, leaving Joe alone with Sally. Smitten by Joe’s brazen sexuality, Sally confides that she is lonely living in the thirty-six room mansion fashioned after a Scottish castle that she won in the divorce settlement from her last husband, and offers to introduce him to some producers if he agrees never to leave her. Joe, a sexual opportunist, immediately seduces Sally, but when Sally demands constant reassurance about her attractiveness, Joe announces that he is going home. Hysterical, Sally offers to arrange a meeting with Ray, a producer friend of hers, and buys Joe some new clothes. At the meeting, Sally tries to convince Ray to hire Joe for a television movie-of-the-week, but Ray is not interested. Some time later, Jessica, living at the motel alone since Bonnie’s institutionalization for her suicide attempt, finds fellow motel inhabitants Gary and his mute brother Eric sunning themselves on a mattress out back. The brothers have a nightclub act in which they sing, dance and “have a little sex on stage,” and Jessica suggests they talk to Joe about appearing in the act with them. Later, at the mansion, Joe and Sally are in the midst of having sex when Jessica appears, announcing that she is no longer a lesbian and wants to move back in with her mother. When Sally goes to the motel to pay her daughter’s bill, Lydia informs her that she and Joe had sex, upsetting Sally. Determined to seduce Joe herself, Jessica is lying on the floor in her underwear, flaunting her body at Joe when Sally walks in. Jealous, Sally dismisses Jessica. Later, Sally, accompanied by Joe and Jessica, visits Jessica’s movie-producer father Sidney. When Sally demands that Sidney give her more money for child support, Sidney calls her “an aging, minor, practically unknown star who can’t act.” The two then retire into a separate room to discuss their financial affairs. Soon after, Harold, Sidney’s actor lover, arrives home, and as he shows Joe a scrapbook of his career, begins to fondle Joe’s leg. Sally and Sidney return to the living room to find Harold performing a sexual act on Joe. As Sally alternately chastises Joe and begs him to stay with her, he walks out. Unhinged, Sally grabs a gun from a drawer and follows Joe back to the motel where she finds him flirting with a woman by the pool. Pulling out her gun, Sally fires, but the barrel is empty. Frustrated, Sally tosses the weapon into the pool and leaves.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.