Pocket Money (1972)

PG | 98-99 or 102 mins | Comedy-drama, Western | February 1972

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HISTORY

The working title was Jim Kane . James Arnett's onscreen credit reads: "Technical advisor and 2nd unit director." Art director Tambi Larsen's name was misspelled "Larson" in the onscreen credits. Pocket Money marked the inaugural release of First Artists Production Company, Ltd., which was founded in 1969 by Paul Newman, Barbra Streisand and Sidney Poitier. Steve McQueen joined the company in 1971, followed by Dustin Hoffman in 1972. Producer John Foreman was Newman’s partner in their Newman-Foreman Co., Inc. Co-production company Coleytown was also owned by Newman.
       According to Filmfacts , Martin Ritt was originally set to direct the film. Pocket Money was the first produced film written by Terrence Malick, although he had previously written Deadhead Miles , which was not officially released until 1982 (see above). As noted in contemporary sources, the film was shot on location in Santa Fe, NM, in Arizona in Nogales and Phoenix and in Mexico. A May 1971 Army Archerd column in DV reported that the film cost $2.7 million, with both Lee Marvin and Newman working for a low fee in return for a percentage of profits. Stuart Rosenberg had directed Newman in two previous films, Cool Hand Luke (1967, see above) and WUSA (1970, see below) and went on to direct him in 1975’s The Drowning Pool . A modern source adds Bruce Davis Bayne to the ... More Less

The working title was Jim Kane . James Arnett's onscreen credit reads: "Technical advisor and 2nd unit director." Art director Tambi Larsen's name was misspelled "Larson" in the onscreen credits. Pocket Money marked the inaugural release of First Artists Production Company, Ltd., which was founded in 1969 by Paul Newman, Barbra Streisand and Sidney Poitier. Steve McQueen joined the company in 1971, followed by Dustin Hoffman in 1972. Producer John Foreman was Newman’s partner in their Newman-Foreman Co., Inc. Co-production company Coleytown was also owned by Newman.
       According to Filmfacts , Martin Ritt was originally set to direct the film. Pocket Money was the first produced film written by Terrence Malick, although he had previously written Deadhead Miles , which was not officially released until 1982 (see above). As noted in contemporary sources, the film was shot on location in Santa Fe, NM, in Arizona in Nogales and Phoenix and in Mexico. A May 1971 Army Archerd column in DV reported that the film cost $2.7 million, with both Lee Marvin and Newman working for a low fee in return for a percentage of profits. Stuart Rosenberg had directed Newman in two previous films, Cool Hand Luke (1967, see above) and WUSA (1970, see below) and went on to direct him in 1975’s The Drowning Pool . A modern source adds Bruce Davis Bayne to the cast.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
21 Feb 1972.
---
Daily Variety
22 Apr 1971.
---
Daily Variety
5 May 1971.
---
Filmfacts
1972
pp. 172-74.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Apr 1971.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Apr 1971
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
3 May 1971.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jun 1971
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Feb 1972.
---
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
4 Jul 1971
Section D, p. 1.
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
10 Feb 1972.
---
Los Angeles Times
10 Feb 1972.
---
New York Times
25 Oct 1970.
---
New York Times
20 Apr 1972
p. 50.
New York Times
7 May 1972
Section II, p. 1.
Variety
16 Feb 1972
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Adpt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus score
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Men's hair consultant
Hairstylist
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Tech adv
Scr supv
Prod representative
Locs
Unit pub
American Human Association representative
STAND INS
Stunt double
Stunt double
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Jim Kane by J. P. S. Brown (New York, 1970).
SONGS
"Pocket Money," words and music by Carole King, performed by Carole King.
PERFORMER
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Jim Kane
Release Date:
February 1972
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 9 February 1972
Production Date:
late April--mid July 1971
Copyright Claimants:
National General Pictures Corp., First Artists Production Co., Ltd. Coleytown Productions, Inc.
Copyright Dates:
9 February 1972 9 February 1972
Copyright Numbers:
LP40999 LP40999
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
98-99 or 102
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Nogales, Arizona Jim Kane, a cowboy who possesses more good nature than good sense, hires out as a jack-of-all-trades. When his latest purchase of horses is proved to have gonorrhea, Jim is unable to pay his bank loan, but secures an extension from the bank manager, who gently advises Jim to inspect the stock before purchasing it. At the local hotel, the clerk, who regards Jim as one of her favorite customers, lets him stay in the maid’s quarters for free. Later, Jim meets his uncle Herb for a drink, but turns down the older man’s request for Jim to buy his horses for him, stating that although he knows how to bid, he never knows when. Soon after, an acquaintance, Stretch Russell, invites Jim to meet a cattle buyer named Bill Garrett. Garrett wants Jim to travel to Mexico to buy him 250 cows for use in the rodeo, promising two dollars per head plus expenses, with half of the payment up front. After Herb advises Jim that Garrett is a known hustler, Jim asks Garrett if this is true and waffles on whether or not to trust the businessman. He then visits his beloved ex-wife, a carhop, and when he informs her that he cannot make the alimony payments, she kindly calls him “a baby” and admonishes him to take good care of her. Newly determined to earn as much as he can, Jim returns to Garrett and reluctantly accepts the job. In his car, Garrett pays Jim from a wad of cash hidden in a body belt inside his pants. Jim then heads to Mexico looking for his old friend Leonard, a wily American who ... +


In Nogales, Arizona Jim Kane, a cowboy who possesses more good nature than good sense, hires out as a jack-of-all-trades. When his latest purchase of horses is proved to have gonorrhea, Jim is unable to pay his bank loan, but secures an extension from the bank manager, who gently advises Jim to inspect the stock before purchasing it. At the local hotel, the clerk, who regards Jim as one of her favorite customers, lets him stay in the maid’s quarters for free. Later, Jim meets his uncle Herb for a drink, but turns down the older man’s request for Jim to buy his horses for him, stating that although he knows how to bid, he never knows when. Soon after, an acquaintance, Stretch Russell, invites Jim to meet a cattle buyer named Bill Garrett. Garrett wants Jim to travel to Mexico to buy him 250 cows for use in the rodeo, promising two dollars per head plus expenses, with half of the payment up front. After Herb advises Jim that Garrett is a known hustler, Jim asks Garrett if this is true and waffles on whether or not to trust the businessman. He then visits his beloved ex-wife, a carhop, and when he informs her that he cannot make the alimony payments, she kindly calls him “a baby” and admonishes him to take good care of her. Newly determined to earn as much as he can, Jim returns to Garrett and reluctantly accepts the job. In his car, Garrett pays Jim from a wad of cash hidden in a body belt inside his pants. Jim then heads to Mexico looking for his old friend Leonard, a wily American who moved south to pursue one of his many failed get-rich-quick schemes. In the courtyard of Leonard’s hotel, local men Juan and Chavarin, the sons of government officials, bait Jim, who lashes back verbally but prefers to avoid a fight. He finds Leonard in bed nursing a hangover, but soon interests him in facilitating Jim’s search for cattle to buy. After renting some animal pens from Chavarin, they attend a leisurely local luncheon with Jim, at which Jim becomes frustrated because he must attend to social niceties before settling down to business. Noting Jim’s irritability, Juan raises his feed prices, egged on by the incompetent Leonard. Later, local beauty Adelita challenges Jim to ride one of her broncos, and after impressing the men with his riding prowess, Jim is thrown painfully. On the range, Jim clumsily flirts with Adelita and later states to Leonard that he is falling in love. Leonard dispenses useless advice about how to make her love him, then brings Jim to the first cattle seller. When the seller asks 500 pesos per head, Leonard explains to Jim that he can negotiate down to 400, but Jim insists on paying the full price in order to make a good impression. They ride burros to the next seller, who demands that they buy his skinny old cows if they want the healthy stock. Jim attempts to negotiate but, bungling the job, leaves empty-handed. Soon he meets with Stretch, who furnishes him with a small amount of cash and a blank check he will be able to cash in two weeks. When Stretch reveals that Garrett now wants Jim to drive the cattle to Chihuahua, Jim counters that the cows will certainly land in quarantine, but Stretch guarantees that Garrett can arrange to avoid that fate. Upon returning to the pens, Jim learns that Chavarin has sold the feed and is letting the cows graze on the desert land. Although Leonard warns Jim not to argue with Chavarin, Jim fires him unceremoniously, then later easily overpowers Chavarin when he challenges Jim to a fight. After several more inept business deals, Jim amasses a herd of mostly old and skinny cows. Soon after, however, Chavarin presses charges of assault and Jim, who refuses to pay Chavarin off, is incarcerated in a filthy jail. Leonard sells Jim’s pickup truck to post his bail and together they drive Leonard’s convertible until they spot Chavarin, at whom Jim throws a rock. Jim then tries to cash Stretch’s check, but it bounces, and with no other choice they determine to bring the cattle to Chihuahua to confront Garrett. With a handful of Mexican cowhands, they set out on the drive. Along the way, Jim fends off Leonard’s many questionable schemes and, despite his frustration with Stretch and Garrett, continues to believe that they will pay him in Chihuahua. One night, the men hear rustlers, and Jim lazily fires Leonard’s gun into the sky to frighten them off. Upon arriving at the train station to Chihuahua, Jim pays off the hands as Leonard makes a bombastic announcement promising to respect the men always. They while away the train ride and then, upon reaching Chihuahua, are discomforted when Stretch is not there to greet them. With no money left to pay for the train or cattle trucks, Jim and Leonard sneak away and steal the trucks, but as soon as they deliver the cattle, the herd is quarantined for 60 days. Days later, Jim spots Stretch and demands his money, but Stretch declares that because the cows are being held, it will be too late for Garrett to sell them to the rodeo, and consequently no profit can be made from them. Jim is befuddled, but Leonard informs him that he has located Stretch’s hotel room, and when the two break into the room and threaten Stretch, he quickly admits that Garrett is downstairs in the barbershop. Jim confronts the businessman and follows him back to the room, where Garrett angrily insists that he cannot pay. Jim hurls the TV set off the balcony, then wrestles Garrett down and, sitting on top of him, searches for his money belt. Finding nothing, Jim leaves, followed by Leonard, who proclaims Garrett to be lacking dignity. Later, they chortle about the TV and Leonard declares that he could have cut a dollar bill sign into Garrett’s stomach. Jim, who still believes Garrett is truthful, wonders aloud if that would have accomplished much, and as they await the next train out of Chihuahua, Leonard cheerfully proclaims that at least they still have each other. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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