Breezy (1973)

R | 105-106 or 109 mins | Drama | November 1973

Director:

Clint Eastwood

Writer:

Jo Heims

Producer:

Robert Daley

Cinematographer:

Frank Stanley

Editor:

Ferris Webster

Production Designer:

Alexander Golitzen

Production Companies:

The Malpaso Company, Universal Pictures
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HISTORY

According to an Aug 1969 HR news item, director Harry Falk and actors Stephen Young and James Farentino originally optioned Jo Heims's script for Breezy , which was to be directed by Falk for their Step 3 production company. Studio publicity contained in the film's production file at the AMPAS Library noted that location shooting was done in the actual Los Angeles locations cited by the script. Among them were Laurel, Topanga and Nichols Canyons, Marina Del Rey, Pacific Coast Highway, Lookout Mountain, Hollywood and Ventura Boulevards, Plummer Park and Griffith Park.
       At the time Breezy was made, Laurel Canyon was known as a place where hippies would congregate. The movie that "Breezy" and "Frank" attend is director Clint Eastwood's film High Plains Drifter (see below). Breezy was the first film directed by Eastwood in which he did not star. He did make a brief appearance in the picture, though as a man standing on the pier. Scott Holden, who played the "Veterinarian," is star William Holden's son. Although actress Kay Lenz made a brief appearance under the name Kay Ann Kemper, in the 1973 production American Graffiti , Breezy marked Lenz's first starring role in a motion picture.
       Reviews were critical of the film. The Var reviewer noted "too much laugh/smile/chuckle sitcom patter and situation make the film more like a tv feature" and concluded that "the Universal release is a delicate commercial bet which may find its audience with difficulty." An Aug 1974 NYT article supported the conclusion of the Var ... More Less

According to an Aug 1969 HR news item, director Harry Falk and actors Stephen Young and James Farentino originally optioned Jo Heims's script for Breezy , which was to be directed by Falk for their Step 3 production company. Studio publicity contained in the film's production file at the AMPAS Library noted that location shooting was done in the actual Los Angeles locations cited by the script. Among them were Laurel, Topanga and Nichols Canyons, Marina Del Rey, Pacific Coast Highway, Lookout Mountain, Hollywood and Ventura Boulevards, Plummer Park and Griffith Park.
       At the time Breezy was made, Laurel Canyon was known as a place where hippies would congregate. The movie that "Breezy" and "Frank" attend is director Clint Eastwood's film High Plains Drifter (see below). Breezy was the first film directed by Eastwood in which he did not star. He did make a brief appearance in the picture, though as a man standing on the pier. Scott Holden, who played the "Veterinarian," is star William Holden's son. Although actress Kay Lenz made a brief appearance under the name Kay Ann Kemper, in the 1973 production American Graffiti , Breezy marked Lenz's first starring role in a motion picture.
       Reviews were critical of the film. The Var reviewer noted "too much laugh/smile/chuckle sitcom patter and situation make the film more like a tv feature" and concluded that "the Universal release is a delicate commercial bet which may find its audience with difficulty." An Aug 1974 NYT article supported the conclusion of the Var reviewer, noting that the film received disappointing audience reception and that, as a result, Universal decided to give the film a second chance by "four walling" it in Salt Lake City and other towns around the country. In four walling, a producer would rent a theater for a flat fee rather than pay the theater owner a percentage of the receipts. In an interview reprinted in a modern source, Eastwood stated that the film failed because Universal did not publicize it properly. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
10 Dec 1973
p. 4647.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Aug 1969.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Nov 1972
p. 24.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Nov 1972.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Dec 1972
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Oct 1973
p. 3.
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
14 Nov 1973.
---
New York Times
19 Nov 1973
p. 53.
New York Times
14 Aug 1974.
---
Newsweek
3 Dec 1973.
---
Time
10 Dec 1973.
---
Variety
7 Nov 1973
p. 19.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Trainee
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
Wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Asst cam
Asst cam
Key grip
2d grip
Company grip
Crane grip
C. S. E.
Gaffer
Best boy
Lamp op
Lamp op
Gen op
Stillman
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop
Lead man
Swing
COSTUMES
Men's cost
Ladies' cost
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles & optical eff
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Cosmetics by
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Dial coach
Unit prod mgr
Scr supv
Unit pub
Driver capt
First aid
Condor driver
STAND INS
Stunt coord
SOURCES
SONGS
"Breezy's Song," music by Michel Legrand, lyrics by Marilyn and Alan Bergman, vocal by Shelby Flint.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Release Date:
November 1973
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 16 November 1973
New York opening: 18 November 1973
Production Date:
mid November--late December 1972
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures and The Malpaso Company
Copyright Date:
18 November 1973
Copyright Number:
LP43605
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
105-106 or 109
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In shabby room in the Laurel Canyon area of Los Angeles, Breezy, an itinerant young hippie, awakens next to Bruno, a young man she had just met the night before who offered her shelter from the rain. Slinging her guitar over her shoulder, Breezy hikes to Laurel Canyon Blvd. where she hitches a ride with a middle-aged man. When the man veers off the main road and begins to recount tales of sex with the hitchhikers he has picked up, Breezy jumps out of the car and hides in the bushes near the home of divorced real estate agent Frank Harmon. Inside the house, Frank is saying goodbye to a woman with whom he has just spent the night, but when the woman encourages Frank to call her again, he takes her phone number reluctantly, then throws it away once she has departed. As Frank walks to his car to drive to his office, he sees Breezy sitting on the curb. Breezy asks for a ride down the hill, and begins to chatter insistently, annoying the dour, taciturn Frank. Suddenly spotting an injured dog lying by the side of the road, Breezy insists that Frank stop the car and let her out. As they look at the dog, Frank announces that the animal is dead, and after Breezy, distraught, runs off, the dog whimpers and Frank scoops it into his arms and carries it to his car, where he sees the guitar that Breezy has left behind on his back seat. Later, Frank, accompanied by Betty Tobin, a woman he has been dating, goes to inspect a house for sale. ... +


In shabby room in the Laurel Canyon area of Los Angeles, Breezy, an itinerant young hippie, awakens next to Bruno, a young man she had just met the night before who offered her shelter from the rain. Slinging her guitar over her shoulder, Breezy hikes to Laurel Canyon Blvd. where she hitches a ride with a middle-aged man. When the man veers off the main road and begins to recount tales of sex with the hitchhikers he has picked up, Breezy jumps out of the car and hides in the bushes near the home of divorced real estate agent Frank Harmon. Inside the house, Frank is saying goodbye to a woman with whom he has just spent the night, but when the woman encourages Frank to call her again, he takes her phone number reluctantly, then throws it away once she has departed. As Frank walks to his car to drive to his office, he sees Breezy sitting on the curb. Breezy asks for a ride down the hill, and begins to chatter insistently, annoying the dour, taciturn Frank. Suddenly spotting an injured dog lying by the side of the road, Breezy insists that Frank stop the car and let her out. As they look at the dog, Frank announces that the animal is dead, and after Breezy, distraught, runs off, the dog whimpers and Frank scoops it into his arms and carries it to his car, where he sees the guitar that Breezy has left behind on his back seat. Later, Frank, accompanied by Betty Tobin, a woman he has been dating, goes to inspect a house for sale. At the house, Betty tells Frank that she is in love with him, but because he is incapable of returning her feelings, she has accepted a marriage proposal from a lawyer named Charlie. That evening, Frank is at home paying bills when Breezy arrives to reclaim her guitar. Breezy cajoles Frank into letting her take a shower in his luxurious bathroom, then gleefully disrobes in front of him. When he tries to dismiss her candor and impetuousness, she remarks that she feels sorry for him and leaves. The next day, Frank looks out his office window to see a group of hippies standing on the street and is reminded of Breezy. That night, a police officer brings Breezy to Frank’s house. The officer explains that Breezy, whom he found wandering in the hills, claimed to be Frank’s niece. Frank confirms her story, and once the police have left, Breezy begs him to drive her to the ocean, which she has not had a chance to see during her three-month stay in California. Later, as they run along the beach, Breezy kisses him, and afterward they stroll hand-in-hand. By the time they reach home, Breezy has fallen asleep and Frank tenderly carries her to bed and tucks her in. She then sleepily opens her eyes and asks Frank if he would mind if she loved him. When Frank questions whether she wants to be loved back, she responds she thought she was, to which he sighs resignedly and walks out. The next morning Frank is disappointed when he awakens to find that Breezy has left. Upon returning home that evening, Frank finds Breezy waiting for him on the curb, and although he is glad to see her, he has an appointment to meet Betty and Charlie at their engagement party to sign the papers on the house he has sold them. Inviting Breezy to stay, Frank promises to return home early, and at the party, he anxiously anticipates his meeting with Breezy. Later, upon arriving home, Frank finds Breezy waiting to make love to him. The following morning, he asks about her life, and rather than the sordid story he expected, she tells him that her real name is Edith Alice Breezerman, and that after her parents died in an automobile accident, she went to live with her aunt. Upon finishing high school, she decided to leave her small town and travel to California. Frank then surprises Breezy by taking her to the veterinary hospital to pick up the now recovered dog, who Breezy names Sir Love-A-Lot. When Frank takes Breezy to a store to buy a new outfit, the clerk mistakes him for Breezy’s father. Later, as they romp in the park with the dog, Frank tells Breezy that he is too old for her, and she asks if becoming older means that you also stop feeling. One night, Frank takes Breezy to a restaurant for dinner. Paula, Frank’s bitter, alcoholic, ex-wife is there, and tries to embarrass him by commenting about Breezy’s age. Beginning to have feelings for Breezy, Frank takes her to the ocean the next afternoon and confides that she has reawakened him to life. That night, however, the couple goes to the movies where they encounter Frank’s friends Bob and Nancy Henderson, who are visibly shocked to see him with such a young woman. The following day, Frank meets Bob at the gym. In the steam room, Bob confesses that he is jealous of Frank’s sexual freedom, but adds that he would feel like a child molester to be involved with a young woman. Suddenly feeling foolish, Frank decides to end the relationship, and when he arrives home to find Breezy cooking dinner, he brusquely announces that is going out and might not come home that night. Frank then admits that he feels their relationship is just a dirty joke and cannot cope with the idea of them being a couple. Hugging Sir Love-A-Lot goodbye, Breezy departs in tears. Soon after, Frank receives a phone call notifying him that Betty has been injured in an automobile accident. Frank hurries to the hospital, where the doctor informs him that Charlie was killed in the accident and that Betty is lucky to be alive. As Frank sits with Betty at her bedside, she laments that she and Charlie loved each other but had only one week together rather than the life time they had anticipated. Feeling the loss of Breezy, Frank finds her at Plummer Park, where he releases Sir Love-A-Lot’s leash. When the dog gambols over to Breezy, she turns and sees Frank. Frank greets Breezy by saying “hello, my love,” then jokingly adds that if they are lucky, they might last a year, to which Breezy responds, "just think of it Frank, a whole year!" +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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