Titanic (1997)

PG-13 | 194 or 197 mins | Romance, Drama | 19 December 1997

THIS TITLE IS OUTSIDE THE AFI CATALOG OF FEATURE FILMS (1893-1993)
You may also like these titles from the AFI Catalog of Feature Films, the most authoritative documentation of the First 100 Years of American filmmaking.

Director:

James Cameron

Writer:

James Cameron

Cinematographer:

Russell Carpenter

Production Designer:

Peter Lamont

Production Companies:

Lightstorm Entertainment , Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp., Paramount Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Titanic was ranked 83rd on AFI's 2007 100 Years…100 Movies--10th Anniversary Edition list of the greatest American films; 25th on AFI's 2001 100 Years...100 Thrills list of the most thrilling American films; 37th on AFI's 2002 100 Years...100 Passions list of the greatest love stories of all time; and 6th on AFI's 2008 10 Top 10 list of the greatest American epics. The line, "I'm the king of the world!" was ranked 100th on AFI's 2005 100 Years...100 Movie Quotes list; and "My Heart Will Go On," performed by Celine Dion, was ranked 14th on AFI's 2004 100 Years...100 Songs list of the top 100 movie songs of all ...

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Titanic was ranked 83rd on AFI's 2007 100 Years…100 Movies--10th Anniversary Edition list of the greatest American films; 25th on AFI's 2001 100 Years...100 Thrills list of the most thrilling American films; 37th on AFI's 2002 100 Years...100 Passions list of the greatest love stories of all time; and 6th on AFI's 2008 10 Top 10 list of the greatest American epics. The line, "I'm the king of the world!" was ranked 100th on AFI's 2005 100 Years...100 Movie Quotes list; and "My Heart Will Go On," performed by Celine Dion, was ranked 14th on AFI's 2004 100 Years...100 Songs list of the top 100 movie songs of all time.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Los Angeles Times
19 Dec 1997
Calendar, p. 1.
New York Times
19 Dec 1997
Section 5, p. 1.
Variety
3 Nov 1997
p. 7.
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 December 1997
Premiere Information:
New York and Los Angeles opening: 19 Dec 1997
Copyright Info
Claimant
DATE
CopyrightNumber
Paramount Pictures Corporation
16 December 1997
PA780847
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
16 December 1997
PA80847
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Digital; dts Digital Sound; SDDS Sony Dynamic Digital Sound in selected theatres
Color
CFI Color
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Lenses/Prints
Kodak film stock; prints by deluxe laboratories
Duration(in mins):
194 or 197
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
35593
SYNOPSIS

In 1996, a diving team led by Brock Lovett explores the sunken R.M.S. Titanic in search of treasure, specifically a large blue diamond known as the “Heart of the Ocean.” They discover a nude drawing made during the Titanic’s voyage, in which the subject, Rose DeWitt Bukater, wears the Heart of the Ocean around her neck. The woman, now Rose Dawson Calvert, is brought to the research vessel to talk with Lovett. She recalls the beginning of the Titanic’s voyage, in April 1912: in Southampton, England, seventeen-year-old Rose boards the ship with her mother, Ruth, and her fiancé, Cal Hockley. Rose despises Hockley but has resigned to marry him to restore her family’s finances and social status. Nevertheless, she contemplates suicide by throwing herself off the ship. Meanwhile, Jack Dawson, a poor young artist, has boarded the Titanic via a third-class ticket won in a poker game. Dawson happens upon Rose and dissuades her from killing herself. Hockley reacts jealously when he discovers the two together, but Rose insists that Jack saved her from an accidental fall over the side of the ship. Hockley invites the young man to join them at dinner in the first-class dining saloon. Rose continues to enjoy Jack’s company and sneaks away with him after the meal. Although she initially rejects his romantic advances, after spending more time with him, she agrees to pose for a nude sketch. In her room, she sits ...

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In 1996, a diving team led by Brock Lovett explores the sunken R.M.S. Titanic in search of treasure, specifically a large blue diamond known as the “Heart of the Ocean.” They discover a nude drawing made during the Titanic’s voyage, in which the subject, Rose DeWitt Bukater, wears the Heart of the Ocean around her neck. The woman, now Rose Dawson Calvert, is brought to the research vessel to talk with Lovett. She recalls the beginning of the Titanic’s voyage, in April 1912: in Southampton, England, seventeen-year-old Rose boards the ship with her mother, Ruth, and her fiancé, Cal Hockley. Rose despises Hockley but has resigned to marry him to restore her family’s finances and social status. Nevertheless, she contemplates suicide by throwing herself off the ship. Meanwhile, Jack Dawson, a poor young artist, has boarded the Titanic via a third-class ticket won in a poker game. Dawson happens upon Rose and dissuades her from killing herself. Hockley reacts jealously when he discovers the two together, but Rose insists that Jack saved her from an accidental fall over the side of the ship. Hockley invites the young man to join them at dinner in the first-class dining saloon. Rose continues to enjoy Jack’s company and sneaks away with him after the meal. Although she initially rejects his romantic advances, after spending more time with him, she agrees to pose for a nude sketch. In her room, she sits for him wearing only her Heart of the Ocean necklace—a gift from Cal. Afteward, they elude Cal’s bodyguard, Mr. Lovejoy, by sneaking into the cargo hold, where they have sex inside a motorcar. When they return to an upper deck, Rose and Jack witness the Titanic crash into an iceberg. A mounting hysteria ensues as officers of the ship confront the likelihood that the vessel will sink. In the meantime, Hockley finds the nude sketch of Rose. At his behest, Lovejoy plants the Heart of the Ocean necklace inside Jack’s pocket, and Jack is arrested for theft. As the ship begins to sink, passengers frantically board lifeboats. Rose separates from her mother and Hockley, and rushes to free Jack from the master-at-arms’s office. Soon after, Jack and Hockley urge Rose to take an available seat on a lifeboat, but she cannot bear to leave Jack. An angry Hockley seizes Mr. Lovejoy’s handgun and chases Rose and Jack into the first-class dining saloon, partially underwater. He shoots at them but misses. To save himself, he picks up a lost child and uses him to gain access to a lifeboat. Jack and Rose remain on the ship after all the lifeboats have been filled. Abandoned passengers fall or jump to their deaths as the ship’s stern rises. When the vessel breaks into two, Jack and Rose are plunged into the ocean. He helps her climb onto a floating piece of wood but refuses to join her lest it sink. As he succumbs to hypothermia, Jack soothes Rose with a vision of her promising future. Only Rose survives the ordeal. She is brought aboard the rescue ship, R.M.S. Carpathia, where she narrowly avoids Hockley. Arriving in New York City, Rose registers her name as Rose Dawson, and begins her new life. Back in the present, elderly Rose recalls that Hockley ultimately killed himself after the stock market crash of 1929. Impacted by her story, Lovett changes his mind and abandons his search for the Heart of the Ocean. Secretly, Rose still has the diamond in her possession, after Hockley unwittingly returned it to her while the Titanic was sinking. She goes alone to drop the diamond into the ocean, just above the wreck. Later, in a dream, she and Jack are reunited on the Titanic as it was before it sank, surrounded by other passengers who applaud when they kiss.

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GENRE
Genres:
Sub-genre:
Historical, Disaster


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.