Pulp Fiction (1994)

R | Comedy-drama | 14 October 1994

THIS TITLE IS OUTSIDE THE AFI CATALOG OF FEATURE FILMS (1893-1993)
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Director:

Quentin Tarantino

Producer:

Lawrence Bender

Cinematographer:

Andrzej Sekula

Editor:

Sally Menke

Production Designer:

David Wasco

Production Companies:

A Band Apart , Jersey Films
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HISTORY

Pulp Fiction was ranked 94th on AFI's 2007 100 Years…100 Movies--10th Anniversary Edition list of the greatest American films, up from the 95th position it held on the 1997 list. It was also ranked 53rd on AFI's 2001 100 Years...100 Thrills list of the 100 most thrilling American films of all time. ...

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Pulp Fiction was ranked 94th on AFI's 2007 100 Years…100 Movies--10th Anniversary Edition list of the greatest American films, up from the 95th position it held on the 1997 list. It was also ranked 53rd on AFI's 2001 100 Years...100 Thrills list of the 100 most thrilling American films of all time.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Los Angeles Times
14 Oct 1994
Calendar, p. 1
New York Times
23 Sep 1994
Section III, p. 1
Variety
23 May 1994
p. 52
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Film by Quentin Tarantino
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Stories by
Stories by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITOR
MUSIC
Mus supv
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 October 1994
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Miramax Film Corp.
21 July 1995
PA704507
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Spectral Recording in selected theatres
Color
Eastman Color Films; Color by de luxe
Widescreen/ratio
Filmed in Panavision
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
33107
SYNOPSIS

Referring to each other as “Pumpkin” and “Honey Bunny,” two lovers finish their meal at a diner, and decide to hold up the place. Elsewhere, at another time, Vincent Vega and Jules Winnfield arrive at an apartment to collect a briefcase from a man named Brett, on behalf of their gangster boss, Marsellus Wallace. Inside the apartment, the hitmen shoot Brett and one of his cohorts for double-dealing behind Marsellus’s back. They deliver the briefcase to Marsellus, as he is cutting a deal with a boxer named Butch, who agrees to throw an upcoming boxing match. Afterward, Marsellus enlists Vincent to take his wife, Mia, out on the town while he is away. Prior to picking her up, Vincent buys heroin from his drug dealer, Lance, and injects himself with a dose. Mia, a once-aspiring actress, goes with him to a 1950s-themed restaurant, where the two bond over milkshakes and participate in a dance contest, which they win. Returning home, Mia discovers the heroin in Vincent’s jacket while he is in the bathroom. Assuming it is cocaine, she snorts the drug and accidentally overdoses. Vincent rushes her to Lance’s house, where they revive her with a shot of adrenaline to the heart. Butch, the boxer, betrays Marsellus by winning his boxing match and accidentally killing his opponent in the process. At a motel, he prepares to flee town with his girl friend, Fabienne, who reveals that she forgot to pack Butch’s lucky gold watch, passed down to him by his father. Aware that Marsellus might have already sent a hitman after him, Butch risks a trip back home to retrieve the watch. Inside his apartment, he discovers a gun ...

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Referring to each other as “Pumpkin” and “Honey Bunny,” two lovers finish their meal at a diner, and decide to hold up the place. Elsewhere, at another time, Vincent Vega and Jules Winnfield arrive at an apartment to collect a briefcase from a man named Brett, on behalf of their gangster boss, Marsellus Wallace. Inside the apartment, the hitmen shoot Brett and one of his cohorts for double-dealing behind Marsellus’s back. They deliver the briefcase to Marsellus, as he is cutting a deal with a boxer named Butch, who agrees to throw an upcoming boxing match. Afterward, Marsellus enlists Vincent to take his wife, Mia, out on the town while he is away. Prior to picking her up, Vincent buys heroin from his drug dealer, Lance, and injects himself with a dose. Mia, a once-aspiring actress, goes with him to a 1950s-themed restaurant, where the two bond over milkshakes and participate in a dance contest, which they win. Returning home, Mia discovers the heroin in Vincent’s jacket while he is in the bathroom. Assuming it is cocaine, she snorts the drug and accidentally overdoses. Vincent rushes her to Lance’s house, where they revive her with a shot of adrenaline to the heart. Butch, the boxer, betrays Marsellus by winning his boxing match and accidentally killing his opponent in the process. At a motel, he prepares to flee town with his girl friend, Fabienne, who reveals that she forgot to pack Butch’s lucky gold watch, passed down to him by his father. Aware that Marsellus might have already sent a hitman after him, Butch risks a trip back home to retrieve the watch. Inside his apartment, he discovers a gun on the kitchen counter and surmises that someone has broken in. As Vincent Vega emerges from the bathroom, Butch shoots him dead. On the drive back to the motel, Butch is spotted by Marsellus, who gives chase. The pursuit ends at a pawnshop, where Butch and Marsellus are unexpectedly kidnapped by the sadistic shop owner, Maynard. They are taken to the basement, where Marsellus is raped by Maynard and his cohort, Zed, while Butch is held captive by a man in a bondage suit. Butch breaks free, rescues Marsellus, and the two of them kill Maynard and Zed. Thankful for his life, Marsellus agrees to let Butch go but swears him to secrecy over the assault. Earlier, back at Brett’s apartment, Vincent and Jules are poised to leave with the briefcase when another man rushes out of the bathroom, shooting at them but missing with every shot. They retaliate by shooting him dead, and leave with the apartment with Marvin, the only surviving cohort. As they drive, Vincent talks with his gun casually trained on Marvin. Jules hits a bump and Vincent accidentally shoots him dead. With Marvin’s blood splattered throughout the car, they speed to the nearest safe haven, the home of a friend named Jimmie. Vincent and Jules enlist the help of Marsellus’s associate, “The Wolf,” to clean up the car and dispose of the body. Afterward, Jules and Vincent go to a diner. Jules has decided that his and Vincent’s lives were spared earlier by a miracle. He proclaims that his life of crime is now over. Just then, at a nearby table, Pumpkin and Honey Bunny announce they are robbing the place. Jules intervenes and takes Pumpkin at gunpoint. Honey Bunny threatens Jules with her gun. Returning from a trip to the bathroom, Vincent pulls his gun on Honey Bunny. During the ensuing standoff, Jules quotes a Bible passage, Ezekiel 25:17, which he has traditionally recited before murdering his targets. He declares his intent to take the path of “the righteous man” from now on. Still pointing his gun at Pumpkin, he hands over the money in his wallet, and instructs him and Honey Bunny to leave. Having defused the crisis, Jules and Vincent take the briefcase they are about to deliver to Marsellus and leave the diner together.

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Crime


Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.