Lost Canyon (1942)

62 mins | Western | 18 December 1942

Director:

Lesley Selander

Writer:

Harry O. Hoyt

Producer:

Harry Sherman

Cinematographer:

Russell Harlan

Production Designer:

Ralph Berger

Production Company:

Harry Sherman Productions
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HISTORY

This film was a remake of the 1937 Harry Sherman production, Paramount release Rustler's Valley (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.3861). Lost Canyon was originally intended as a Paramount release but was one of several films sold to United Artists for distribution. A HR news item indicated that Speed Hansen's Hill Billy band was cast, but the band's appearance in the film has not been confirmed. Some scenes were filmed on location in Kernville, CA, according to HR . A modern source adds Herman Hack, Merrill McCormack , George Morrell, Spade Cooley, John Cason and Henry Wills to the cast. For additional information on the series, consult the Series Index and see entry for Hop-Along Cassidy in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3. ... More Less

This film was a remake of the 1937 Harry Sherman production, Paramount release Rustler's Valley (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.3861). Lost Canyon was originally intended as a Paramount release but was one of several films sold to United Artists for distribution. A HR news item indicated that Speed Hansen's Hill Billy band was cast, but the band's appearance in the film has not been confirmed. Some scenes were filmed on location in Kernville, CA, according to HR . A modern source adds Herman Hack, Merrill McCormack , George Morrell, Spade Cooley, John Cason and Henry Wills to the cast. For additional information on the series, consult the Series Index and see entry for Hop-Along Cassidy in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3. 1990. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
14 Jan 43
p. 3.
Film Daily
21 Jan 43
p. 7.
Film Daily
10 Feb 43
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
29 May 42
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 42
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jun 42
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jan 43
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
23 Jan 1943.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
23 Jan 43
p. 1126.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Clarence E. Mulford.
SONGS
"Jingle, Jangle, Jingle," music by Joseph J. Lilley, lyrics by Frank Loesser.
DETAILS
Release Date:
18 December 1942
Production Date:
15493
Copyright Claimant:
United Artists Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
11 December 1942
Copyright Number:
LP12304
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Wide Range System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
62
Length(in feet):
5,541
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
8664
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Cowhand Johnny Travers is chased by a sheriff's posse after he is seen leaving the scene of a bank robbery, during which the nightwatchman was killed. Johnny leaps off a high cliff to his apparent death in a river below, and his loss is deeply felt by his friends, cowboys Hopalong Cassidy and California Carlson. Neither man believes Johnny was guilty, however, and their belief is confirmed when Johnny reappears alive and insists that he had nothing to do with the robbery. Johnny hides in a remote cabin so that Hoppy can investigate the robbery and vindicate him. Later, after Hoppy's friend, Laura Clark, breaks her engagement with lawyer Jeff Burton because he is too restrictive, Hoppy learns that Burton has been making offers to all the local ranchers for their ranches. Hoppy then learns from banker Zack Rogers that Burton has stock in the local mine, whose payroll was stolen during the robbery, and that Wade Haskell, the Clark ranch foreman, was the man who identified Johnny at the scene of the crime. California happens to know that Haskell would be friendless if it were not for Burton, who reportedly got him off a rustling charge years earlier. When the loan on the Clark ranch is called in by Rogers, Hoppy confronts Burton and reveals that Johnny is still alive. Hoppy deduces that Burton is responsible for the bank robbery, as he was the only person who could have known that the mine payroll was in the bank. Burton plots with Haskell to kill Hoppy and rustle the Clarks's cattle so that they will not be able to come up with the final ... +


Cowhand Johnny Travers is chased by a sheriff's posse after he is seen leaving the scene of a bank robbery, during which the nightwatchman was killed. Johnny leaps off a high cliff to his apparent death in a river below, and his loss is deeply felt by his friends, cowboys Hopalong Cassidy and California Carlson. Neither man believes Johnny was guilty, however, and their belief is confirmed when Johnny reappears alive and insists that he had nothing to do with the robbery. Johnny hides in a remote cabin so that Hoppy can investigate the robbery and vindicate him. Later, after Hoppy's friend, Laura Clark, breaks her engagement with lawyer Jeff Burton because he is too restrictive, Hoppy learns that Burton has been making offers to all the local ranchers for their ranches. Hoppy then learns from banker Zack Rogers that Burton has stock in the local mine, whose payroll was stolen during the robbery, and that Wade Haskell, the Clark ranch foreman, was the man who identified Johnny at the scene of the crime. California happens to know that Haskell would be friendless if it were not for Burton, who reportedly got him off a rustling charge years earlier. When the loan on the Clark ranch is called in by Rogers, Hoppy confronts Burton and reveals that Johnny is still alive. Hoppy deduces that Burton is responsible for the bank robbery, as he was the only person who could have known that the mine payroll was in the bank. Burton plots with Haskell to kill Hoppy and rustle the Clarks's cattle so that they will not be able to come up with the final loan payment. When the herd is being rustled, Johnny comes out of hiding to warn Clark, but the sheriff wants to arrest him along with Hoppy and California. Laura, in the meantime, has been riding Hoppy's renowned white horse and is shot by Haskell, who mistakes her for Hoppy from a distance. Hoppy, Johnny and California escape from the sheriff, who then realizes that Hoppy's suspicions are correct and follows to help. After rescuing Laura, who only received a flesh wound, Hoppy finds Burton and Haskell in their hideout plotting to pin the cattle rustling on Clark himself by implying that he was trying to steal the herd, which is now technically owned by the bank. Hoppy takes the men hostage and a gunfight erupts between the rustlers and Johnny and California. The posse joins in until the outlaws are captured. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.