Framed (1975)

R | 106 mins | Drama | 3 September 1975

Director:

Phil Karlson

Writer:

Mort Briskin

Cinematographer:

Jack A. Marta

Editor:

Harry Gerstad

Production Designer:

I. Stanford Jolley

Production Company:

Mort Briskin Productions
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HISTORY

       The 1 May 1973 HR announced that John Michael Hayes was writing the script for Framed and shooting was set to begin in mid-Jul 1973 in New Orleans, LA. Hayes was ultimately not involved in the project, and filming didn’t begin until 14 May 1974, in Nashville, TN, instead of New Orleans, according to the 24 May 1974 Var.
       Paramount publicity materials in AMPAS library files reveal the film was shot on locations within twenty miles of the State Capitol in Nashville, TN, including the capitol building itself. At Tennessee State Prison, real security guards and convicts were used as extras. Governor Winfield Dunn loaned his state-owned Lear jet for a sequence filmed at Rutherford County-Smyrna Airport, and Nashville’s historic downtown was closed down after midnight for filming. Other locations were Radnor Lake, the Starlite nightclub in north Nashville, the Sheraton-South Motor Inn, and Longacres, the opulent estate of a local businessman. When a cockroach was needed at the prison to share a solitary cell with actor Joe Don Baker, prop man Allan Gordon imported three from Hollywood, including two “stand-ins.” For the film’s most expensive scene, in which a train locomotive hits a 1973 Chevrolet Impala, film and railroad technicians prepared for a month. They used a private spur line of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, and since the scene could be shot only once, director of photography Jack A. Marta used four regular cameras, including one inside the locomotive cab, as well as steel-encased cameras in the automobile and between the rails. Fire fighters and a mobile first-aid hospital were on hand in case something went wrong. At least two ... More Less

       The 1 May 1973 HR announced that John Michael Hayes was writing the script for Framed and shooting was set to begin in mid-Jul 1973 in New Orleans, LA. Hayes was ultimately not involved in the project, and filming didn’t begin until 14 May 1974, in Nashville, TN, instead of New Orleans, according to the 24 May 1974 Var.
       Paramount publicity materials in AMPAS library files reveal the film was shot on locations within twenty miles of the State Capitol in Nashville, TN, including the capitol building itself. At Tennessee State Prison, real security guards and convicts were used as extras. Governor Winfield Dunn loaned his state-owned Lear jet for a sequence filmed at Rutherford County-Smyrna Airport, and Nashville’s historic downtown was closed down after midnight for filming. Other locations were Radnor Lake, the Starlite nightclub in north Nashville, the Sheraton-South Motor Inn, and Longacres, the opulent estate of a local businessman. When a cockroach was needed at the prison to share a solitary cell with actor Joe Don Baker, prop man Allan Gordon imported three from Hollywood, including two “stand-ins.” For the film’s most expensive scene, in which a train locomotive hits a 1973 Chevrolet Impala, film and railroad technicians prepared for a month. They used a private spur line of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, and since the scene could be shot only once, director of photography Jack A. Marta used four regular cameras, including one inside the locomotive cab, as well as steel-encased cameras in the automobile and between the rails. Fire fighters and a mobile first-aid hospital were on hand in case something went wrong. At least two Impalas were used, including one without an engine that was sacrificed in the scene showing the moment of impact.
       According to a 4 Sep 1974 HR item, a "dual premiere" was scheduled to take place in Nashville, TN, and at the Tennessee State Prison.
      End credits include the following information: “Filmed Entirely on Location in The State of Tennessee.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
14 Jul 1975
p. 4795.
Daily Variety
15 Nov 1972.
---
Daily Variety
20 Mar 1973.
---
Daily Variety
15 Aug 1975.
---
Daily Variety
5 Jun 1974.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 May 1973.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 May 1974
p. 22.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jun 1974
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Aug 1975
p. 10.
LAHExam
3 Sep 1975.
---
Los Angeles Times
3 Sep 1975
p. 12.
New York Times
2 Oct 1975
p. 47.
Variety
24 May 1974.
---
Variety
20 Aug 1975
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Chief elec
Cam op
Asst cam
Asst cam
Still photog
Best boy
Key grip
2d grip
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Props
Set dec
Asst prop man
COSTUMES
Asst cost
Stylist
MUSIC
Recs supv by
Mus ed
SOUND
Prod mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Transportation coord
Asst transportation capt
Loc auditor
Casting
Casting
Prod's secy
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
LITERARY
From the novel The Man Who Wouldn't Stay Framed by Art Powers and Mike Misenheimer (publication date undetermined).
SONGS
"Nearer My Love, To You," composed by Arthur Kent and Frank Stanton, sung by Conny Van Dyke
"He's My Lover," composed by Arthur Kent and Frank Stanton, sung by Conny Van Dyke
"I'll Never Make It Easy," composed by Ben Peters, sung by Conny Van Dyke.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Release Date:
3 September 1975
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 3 September 1975
New York opening: 1 October 1975
Production Date:
began 14 May 1974 in Nashville, TN
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
31 December 1974
Copyright Number:
LP44240
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
106
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
24102
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Professional gambler Ron Lewis flies to Dallas, Texas, for a high-stakes poker game and returns to Tennessee with a bag of money. Driving home in his red Corvette late at night, Ron is blocked by a yellow Chevrolet and another car. As Ron gets out of his car, a figure shoots at him, hitting his front tire, then jumps into the Chevrolet and flees. Ron changes his tire and drives home. When he pulls into his garage, Haskins, a local deputy, assaults him, and in the ensuing fight, Ron accidentally kills the lawman. Sheriff Morello and his deputies arrive, and Ron, badly beaten in the fight, is carried to jail in an ambulance. Sheriff Morello finds Ron’s bag of winnings and steals it. In the jail hospital, Morello eavesdrops from his office as Ron tells his girl friend, Susan Barrett, there is no record of an abandoned car or gun shots on the road the night he killed Haskins, nor did the sheriff report finding his money. Worse, Haskins radioed the dispatcher that he was pursuing a drunk driver in a red Corvette. He asks Susan to hire a private investigator, but when she arrives home later, two men beat and rape her. Two weeks later, Ron, still in jail, asks his lawyer, Andrew Ney, if he heard anything from Susan or the detective she was supposed to hire, but the attorney has heard nothing. When Susan finally comes to see Ron, she is withdrawn and claims she could not find any investigator. Ultimately, on Ney’s advice, Ron pleads guilty to manslaughter. Entering prison, he is marked among the guards as a cop killer. They throw tear gas into ... +


Professional gambler Ron Lewis flies to Dallas, Texas, for a high-stakes poker game and returns to Tennessee with a bag of money. Driving home in his red Corvette late at night, Ron is blocked by a yellow Chevrolet and another car. As Ron gets out of his car, a figure shoots at him, hitting his front tire, then jumps into the Chevrolet and flees. Ron changes his tire and drives home. When he pulls into his garage, Haskins, a local deputy, assaults him, and in the ensuing fight, Ron accidentally kills the lawman. Sheriff Morello and his deputies arrive, and Ron, badly beaten in the fight, is carried to jail in an ambulance. Sheriff Morello finds Ron’s bag of winnings and steals it. In the jail hospital, Morello eavesdrops from his office as Ron tells his girl friend, Susan Barrett, there is no record of an abandoned car or gun shots on the road the night he killed Haskins, nor did the sheriff report finding his money. Worse, Haskins radioed the dispatcher that he was pursuing a drunk driver in a red Corvette. He asks Susan to hire a private investigator, but when she arrives home later, two men beat and rape her. Two weeks later, Ron, still in jail, asks his lawyer, Andrew Ney, if he heard anything from Susan or the detective she was supposed to hire, but the attorney has heard nothing. When Susan finally comes to see Ron, she is withdrawn and claims she could not find any investigator. Ultimately, on Ney’s advice, Ron pleads guilty to manslaughter. Entering prison, he is marked among the guards as a cop killer. They throw tear gas into his cell, beat him when he resists, and send him to the infirmary with injuries, but during his recuperation the guards stop harassing him. Ron is approached by fellow inmate Vince Greeson, who informs Ron that his situation improved because he has “a friend,” Sal Viccarrone, a mob boss with connections inside and outside the prison. Sal admires Ron for standing up to the guards, and for being a professional gambler. Ron reluctantly agrees to play gin with other inmates for Sal’s gambling operation. When two inmates try to hurt Sal, Ron protects him and becomes his right-hand man. One day, Susan comes to visit, but Ron refuses to see her because he believes she was part of the conspiracy against him. Mallory, one of the prison guards, has a grudge against Ron and goads him into a fight that sends him to solitary confinement. After Ron returns to the general prison population, Sal counsels him to stop fighting and wait until his release to take revenge. Three and a half years later, Sal is released from prison, and tells Ron he has arranged for the parole board to order his release at its next meeting. After Ron’s parole two months later, Susan and Sgt. Sam Perry, an African American deputy, greet him at a bus terminal. Sgt. Perry reminds Ron that he needs to register as a parolee at the sheriff’s office within twenty-four hours. He ignores Susan, but later she explains that after his arrest, she spent a week in the hospital because two thugs raped and beat her. When Ron registers at the sheriff’s office the next day, Sgt. Nate Bickford, a cousin of Deputy Haskins, threatens him. Called into the office of Sheriff Bundy, who was a deputy the night he was arrested, Ron demands to speak to the dispatcher to find out how Haskins knew to come after him so quickly. Bundy tells him the dispatcher died of a heart attack some time ago. Later, Sgt. Perry secretly meets Ron and informs him the sheriff’s department’s log book was tampered with, and a reference to the yellow Chevrolet Ron saw was deleted by Sheriff Morello, who is now the city mayor. Furthermore, the car was registered to Dean Tatum, the son of current state senator, Everett Tatum. When Ron later relates this information to Susan, she says Ron's lawyer, Andrew Ney, is now district attorney and Mayor Morello’s right-hand man. Ron goes to Susan’s house alone, and as he walks in, Vince Greeson, his prison buddy, waits for him with a gun. Vince confesses that he is a hit man for a Cleveland organization, and that someone ordered Ron's murder. Vince did not know who his target was until he arrived in town, but despite their friendship, he must kill Ron within twenty-four hours. When Ron calls Sal, the mobster says he will telephone Cleveland and call off the hit. When Ron and Vince go to a club for drinks, Sgt. Nate Bickford threatens to beat him up. Vince privately tells Ron he will handle the problem and leaves. A few minutes later, as Bickford and Ron step outside the club, Vince drops a roll of tarpaper on Bickford and breaks his collarbone. Deputies arrive to arrest Ron, but he convinces them that whoever dropped the tarpaper was trying to hit him instead of Bickford. When Ron goes home and pulls into the garage, two assassins wait for him, but Sgt. Perry arrives in time to shoot both men. Sheriff Bundy orders Ron to his office and asks that he officially corroborate Sgt. Perry’s report of the crime. Later, as Ron drives home, Perry pulls him over and gives him a ticket, along with information. People are watching them both. He says there was a missing person report the night Ron killed Deputy Haskins. Later, Vince Greeson gets news from Sal that Senator Tatum’s son could not have been driving his yellow Chevrolet that night because he died of a drug overdose a couple days earlier. Greeson gives Ron a gun for protection. Convinced that Mayor Morello is behind the frame-up, Greeson goes to his gated estate and sees security wire on top of the fence, as well as a Doberman pinscher watchdog in the yard. Meanwhile, the two who raped Susan four years earlier waylay Ron, put a gun to his head, and tell him to drive. A third man, Frank, follows in another car. When one of the men mentions raping Susan the last time they came to town, Ron swerves off the road and slams on the breaks in front of an oncoming locomotive, causing Frank to rear-end his car. Ron rolls out of the car just seconds before the train smashes into it, and pulls the dazed Frank out of the second car. Ron shoots off his right ear, and Frank confesses that the “hit” was ordered over the telephone, and he was given a $3,000 advance with another $3,000 due when the job was done. As Ron leaves in Frank’s car with the $3,000, Frank swears to kill him the next time they meet. Convinced Frank means what he says, Ron shoots him dead. Later, Mayor Morello orders Sheriff Bundy to kill Ron and retrieve the $3,000. Meanwhile, Ron drives to the state capitol and kidnaps Senator Tatum in the capitol parking lot. He takes Tatum to a secluded lake and nearly drowns him until the politician confesses that he drove his son’s yellow Chevrolet and shot at Ron that night four years earlier, after killing his son’s drug dealer. At Susan’s home, Ron wraps newspapers around Greeson’s forearm, while Susan tries to dissuade them from going after Morello. At the mayor’s estate, Greeson neutralizes the security system, fends off the attack dog with his protected arm, and stabs it with a knife. As they break into Morello’s mansion, Ron and Greeson hear Morello on the telephone, giving Sheriff Bundy orders to shoot Ron on sight. Ron tortures Morello into giving up the combination to his wall safe, and inside he finds most of the money stolen from him four years ago, along with papers documenting Morello’s crooked dealings. When a deputy sheriff enters the room with his gun drawn, Greeson shoots him, but as the man falls, he returns fire, killing Greeson. In the confusion, Ron shoves the mayor through a window, and the wounded Doberman attacks him in the yard. Ron takes the contents of the safe to Susan’s club and tells her to get ready to leave town. She refuses and demands that Ron stay to clear his name. He telephones Sgt.Perry and gives him the documents, but keeps the money. Looking through the ledgers, Perry says they can probably indict half the politicians in the state. 

+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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