Mackintosh & T. J. (1976)

PG | 97 mins | Western | 14 July 1976

Director:

Marvin J. Chomsky

Writer:

Paul Savage

Producer:

Tim Penland

Cinematographer:

Terry K. Meade

Editor:

Howard Smith

Production Designers:

Allen Smith, Trevor Williams

Production Company:

Penland Productions
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HISTORY

       Principal photography began 22 Jul 1975 in Guthrie, TX, and ended a month later on 20 Aug 1975, according to the 20 Aug 1975 Var. The 24 Nov 1975 Box reported that filming also occurred at the Pitchfork Ranch in King and Dickens counties. The 18 Jul 1975 HR noted that the budget was over $800,000, and that producer Tim Penland had already signed a deal with ABC Theatres in the South and Southwest to pay for several hundred release prints and promotions. Mackintosh & T. J. was former singing cowboy Roy Rogers’ first theatrical starring role since Son of Paleface (1952, see entry), the 12 May 1975 Box noted.
       Actor Billy Green Bush, portraying “Luke Jenkins,” refers to the “Jim Webster” character as “Jim West.”
       The 4 Feb 1976 and 16 Feb 1976 editions of Box reported that the film premiered in Lubbock, TX, on 5 Feb 1976 and opened the following day in TX and OK theaters.
      End credits include the following information: “Cadillac furnished by Frank Kent Cadillac, Ft. Worth, Texas,” and, “A special thanks to the 6666 Ranch, and the people of Guthrie, Matador and Dickens, Texas, and the Texas Department of Public Safety.” ... More Less

       Principal photography began 22 Jul 1975 in Guthrie, TX, and ended a month later on 20 Aug 1975, according to the 20 Aug 1975 Var. The 24 Nov 1975 Box reported that filming also occurred at the Pitchfork Ranch in King and Dickens counties. The 18 Jul 1975 HR noted that the budget was over $800,000, and that producer Tim Penland had already signed a deal with ABC Theatres in the South and Southwest to pay for several hundred release prints and promotions. Mackintosh & T. J. was former singing cowboy Roy Rogers’ first theatrical starring role since Son of Paleface (1952, see entry), the 12 May 1975 Box noted.
       Actor Billy Green Bush, portraying “Luke Jenkins,” refers to the “Jim Webster” character as “Jim West.”
       The 4 Feb 1976 and 16 Feb 1976 editions of Box reported that the film premiered in Lubbock, TX, on 5 Feb 1976 and opened the following day in TX and OK theaters.
      End credits include the following information: “Cadillac furnished by Frank Kent Cadillac, Ft. Worth, Texas,” and, “A special thanks to the 6666 Ranch, and the people of Guthrie, Matador and Dickens, Texas, and the Texas Department of Public Safety.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
12 May 1975.
---
Box Office
24 Nov 1975.
---
Box Office
4 Feb 1976.
---
Box Office
16 Feb 1976.
---
Daily Variety
5 Sep 1975.
---
Daily Variety
21 Nov 1975.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jul 1975.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jul 1975
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 1975
p. 23.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Nov 1975
p. 9.
LAHExam
14 Jul 1976.
---
Los Angeles Times
13 Jul 1976
p. 1.
Variety
30 Jul 1975.
---
Variety
20 Aug 1975.
---
Variety
26 Nov 1975
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Penland Productions Presents
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr/Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam
Chief elec
Key grip
Asst cam
Still man
Best boy
Dolly grip
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
COSTUMES
Costumer
MUSIC
Mus ed
Vocals & guitar, recording musician
Drums, recording musician
Steel guitar, recording musician
Bass, recording musician
Harmonica, recording musician
Fiddle, recording musician
Guitar, recording musician
Mus coord
Engineer
Rec tech
SOUND
Sd eff
Boom man
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting supv
Loc casting by
Scr supv
Prod coord
Transportation capt
Auditor
Welfare worker
Animal handler
Helicopter
Van driver
Honeywagon driver
Local co-capt
First aid
Prod asst
STAND INS
Stunt double
Stunt double
Insert car driver
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"All Around Cowboy," written by Jack Wesley Routh and Lendel Pollard, vocal by Waylon Jennings
"Back In The Saddle Again," written by Gene Autry and Ray Whitley, instrumental by The Waylors
"Ride Me Down Easy," written by Billy Joe Shaver, vocal by Waylon Jennings
+
SONGS
"All Around Cowboy," written by Jack Wesley Routh and Lendel Pollard, vocal by Waylon Jennings
"Back In The Saddle Again," written by Gene Autry and Ray Whitley, instrumental by The Waylors
"Ride Me Down Easy," written by Billy Joe Shaver, vocal by Waylon Jennings
"Gardenia Waltz," written by Johnny Gimble, instrumental featuring fiddler Johnny Gimble with The Waylors
"Bob Wills Is Still The King," written by Waylon Jennings, vocal by Waylon Jennings
"Shopping," instrumental by The Waylors
"(Stay All Night) Stay A Little Longer," written by Bob Wills and Tommy Duncan, vocal and guitar by Willie Nelson
"Crazy Arms," written by Ralph Mooney and Charles Seals, instrumental by The Waylors, featuring pedal steel guitarist Ralph Mooney.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 July 1976
Premiere Information:
Premiered 5 February 1976 in Lubbock, TX
Los Angeles opening: 14 July 1976
Production Date:
22 July--20 August 1975 in and around Guthrie, TX
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses/Prints
Lenses and Panaflex Camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
97
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Mackintosh, a middle-aged drifter, stops at a Dickens, Texas, gas station when his aging pickup truck overheats. He asks the owner if anyone in the area is hiring. Across the street, at the county jail, Mackintosh sees the sheriff tell a fourteen-year-old vagabond, T. J., to get out of town or go back to jail. After Mackintosh plugs his radiator and fills several cans with water, he drives to a nearby general store, where he spots T. J. trying to steal an apple. To save the kid from the hovering shopkeeper, Mackintosh tells T. J. to round up some groceries. Mackintosh sends T. J. outside while he pays the bill, but when he returns to his truck, the bag of groceries sits alone on the passenger seat and T. J. is gone. Mackintosh picks him up on the road outside of town. As they become accustomed to each other, T. J. explains that he left home because he never got along with his mother’s boyfriends, and his destination is the Pacific Ocean. Mackintosh says he goes wherever he can find the next job. When Mackintosh’s truck breaks down on a deserted road, T. J. wishes him luck and accepts a ride with a man in a Cadillac. That night, back on the road, Mackintosh stops at a gas station in a small town, then goes nearby to a roadhouse for a steak and coffee. The place is filled with music, dancers, and drinkers. Seeing T. J. bussing tables, Mackintosh calls him over, and T. J. says he left the other driver because he was “funny.” At that moment, Cal, a drunk, realizes his wallet is missing and thinks T. ... +


Mackintosh, a middle-aged drifter, stops at a Dickens, Texas, gas station when his aging pickup truck overheats. He asks the owner if anyone in the area is hiring. Across the street, at the county jail, Mackintosh sees the sheriff tell a fourteen-year-old vagabond, T. J., to get out of town or go back to jail. After Mackintosh plugs his radiator and fills several cans with water, he drives to a nearby general store, where he spots T. J. trying to steal an apple. To save the kid from the hovering shopkeeper, Mackintosh tells T. J. to round up some groceries. Mackintosh sends T. J. outside while he pays the bill, but when he returns to his truck, the bag of groceries sits alone on the passenger seat and T. J. is gone. Mackintosh picks him up on the road outside of town. As they become accustomed to each other, T. J. explains that he left home because he never got along with his mother’s boyfriends, and his destination is the Pacific Ocean. Mackintosh says he goes wherever he can find the next job. When Mackintosh’s truck breaks down on a deserted road, T. J. wishes him luck and accepts a ride with a man in a Cadillac. That night, back on the road, Mackintosh stops at a gas station in a small town, then goes nearby to a roadhouse for a steak and coffee. The place is filled with music, dancers, and drinkers. Seeing T. J. bussing tables, Mackintosh calls him over, and T. J. says he left the other driver because he was “funny.” At that moment, Cal, a drunk, realizes his wallet is missing and thinks T. J. stole it. When Mackintosh gets between him and the boy, Cal pulls a knife and Mackintosh knocks him down with a bottle. At that moment, Cal’s girl friend finds his wallet under their table. T. J. decides to leave with Mackintosh, and they camp along a highway. Nearby, Coley Phipps, who works at the 6666 Ranch, peeks into the window of Maggie Jenkins, the wife of one of his fellow ranch hands, and watches her disrobe. The next morning, when Mackintosh and T. J. awaken, they see the gate of the 6666 Ranch. Driving in, they meet Luke and Maggie Jenkins, who send Mackintosh to see Jim Webster, the man in charge of hiring cowboys. Webster, a friendly man, asks Mackintosh if he can “break” eight “broncos,” wild horses that have never been ridden, and offers $20 per horse. He assigns Mackintosh and T. J. a room at the bunkhouse, where Mackintosh, knowing the horses will try to throw him off, wraps his ribs with linen and tape. After Mackintosh tames the first two broncos, he tells Jim he used to break horses at the famous King Ranch when he was much younger, and Jim replies that he can work at the 6666 as long as he wants. The next day, Jim sends Mackintosh with another ranch hand, Cotton, to fix fences, while T. J. is assigned to cleaning barns. That night, in the nearby town of Matador, Coley Phipps is caught peeking into a woman’s window and her husband chases after him with a gun. The next morning, ranch hands bring in Donkin, a man who lives alone in a nearby cabin, foaming at the mouth and near death with rabies. Mackintosh says the coyote that bit him is probably dead, but others may be infected, so he agrees to hunt them for a bounty. He and T. J. go to Donkin’s filthy cabin, and T. J. sets out to clean it up and burn the rotting furniture while Mackintosh hunts down coyotes and collects their hides. By the time T. J. is done with the cabin, it is livable enough for them to move in. They drive into Matador, Mackintosh collects money for the coyotes pelts at the courthouse, and they shop for clothes and supplies. Outside a store, Mackintosh runs into Maggie Jenkins, who is awkward and timid, and as they talk, fellow ranch hands Cotton and Schuster see them together. That night, at the cabin, T. J. sees a photo of a woman and young boy next to Mackintosh’s bed, and the man explains that his wife and son were killed in a car wreck. Since that time, he has not been able to settle down in one place. The next day, Mackintosh and Maggie run into each other again at the 6666 Ranch’s supply store, and she tells him about Jim Webster’s upcoming birthday party, the biggest party on the ranch. Schuster walks in, sees them together, and asks Maggie if Mackintosh is bothering her. When Maggie’s abusive husband, Luke, later returns to the ranch, Cotton tells him that Maggie is romantically involved with Mackintosh. Luke hits his friend and drives off. Days after, when Mackintosh arrives at Jim’s big outdoor party, several ranch hands act coldly toward him, and Luke gives him menacing looks throughout the evening. Finally, Luke hits Mackintosh and announces he should stay away from his wife. Mackintosh says he will forgive the punch because Luke is drunk, but warns if it happens again, he will give Luke a beating. Later that night, Luke catches Coley peeking into Maggie’s window, and during their ensuing fight, Coley smashes his head with a rock. When Maggie later calls the sheriff, the ranchers arrive, find Luke dead, and drive to Mackintosh’s cabin. Finding him nearby at a stream, they beat and nearly drown him until Jim arrives to tell them Coley killed Luke. They found him hanging, with a confession in his pocket. Mackintosh and T. J. drive to Maggie’s house and give her the news, and from there they leave the ranch and drive down a highway. Mackintosh agrees with T. J. that he would like to see the Pacific Coast, too. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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