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HISTORY


       According to the 14 Aug 1974 Var and the 19 Aug 1974 Box, principal photography began 12 Aug 1974 at the Kentucky State Fair in Louisville, KY. The project’s working title, Honor, was changed to Sheba, Baby around the time filming began.
       Despite bad reviews, Sheba, Baby grossed “a lusty $90,000” at a single Chicago, IL, theater in its first two weeks, the 23 Apr 1975 Var reported. The film completed actress Pam Grier’s contract with American International Pictures (AIP).

      End credits contain the following information: “The producers wish to thank Louisville and Jefferson County Police Dept., United States Coast Guard, Deggeller Spectacular Magic Midway, Kentucky State Fair Board, [and] Norton/Children Hospital for their assistance in the making of this motion picture.”

              The actor who portrays “Racker” is listed as Edward Reece in the opening credits and as Edward Reece, Jr., in the end credits. “Film assignments” in the 6 Sep 1974 HR and the 20 Sep 1974 DV list Lucia Tosti as the “makeup” person, but she is credited onscreen as “wardrobe”; assignments give wardrobe credit to Alice Hay, who is not listed onscreen and who is normally credited as a set decorator in other ... More Less


       According to the 14 Aug 1974 Var and the 19 Aug 1974 Box, principal photography began 12 Aug 1974 at the Kentucky State Fair in Louisville, KY. The project’s working title, Honor, was changed to Sheba, Baby around the time filming began.
       Despite bad reviews, Sheba, Baby grossed “a lusty $90,000” at a single Chicago, IL, theater in its first two weeks, the 23 Apr 1975 Var reported. The film completed actress Pam Grier’s contract with American International Pictures (AIP).

      End credits contain the following information: “The producers wish to thank Louisville and Jefferson County Police Dept., United States Coast Guard, Deggeller Spectacular Magic Midway, Kentucky State Fair Board, [and] Norton/Children Hospital for their assistance in the making of this motion picture.”

              The actor who portrays “Racker” is listed as Edward Reece in the opening credits and as Edward Reece, Jr., in the end credits. “Film assignments” in the 6 Sep 1974 HR and the 20 Sep 1974 DV list Lucia Tosti as the “makeup” person, but she is credited onscreen as “wardrobe”; assignments give wardrobe credit to Alice Hay, who is not listed onscreen and who is normally credited as a set decorator in other films. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
19 Aug 1974.
---
Box Office
31 Mar 1975.
---
Daily Variety
20 Sep 1974.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Aug 1974.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Sep 1974.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Apr 1975
p. 21.
Los Angeles Times
28 Mar 1975
p. 15.
New York Times
27 Mar 1975
p. 37.
Variety
14 Var 1974.
---
Variety
23 Apr 1975
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A William Girdler/David Sheldon Production
A Mid-America Pictures American International Pictures Co-production
An American International Release
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr/1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam
Still cam
Gaffer
Gaffer best boy
Key grip
Key grip
2d grip
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
SET DECORATORS
Set des & dressing
Property
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp, arr, cond and album prod by
Mus comp
Mus consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles & opt
PRODUCTION MISC
Post prod supv
Prod company representative
Scr supv
Asst to the prod
Loc co-ord
Prod secy
Tech asst
Marine seq co-ord
Loc auditor
Loc equip
Jet ski provided by
STAND INS
Stunt co-ord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Sheba, Baby," written by Cleveland & Rancifere, vocals by Barbara Mason, courtesy of Buddah Records
"I'm In Love With You," written by Cleveland & Rancifere, vocals by Barbara Mason, courtesy of Buddah Records
"A Good Man Is Gone," lyrics by Alex Brown, music by Monk Higgins, vocals by Barbara Mason
+
SONGS
"Sheba, Baby," written by Cleveland & Rancifere, vocals by Barbara Mason, courtesy of Buddah Records
"I'm In Love With You," written by Cleveland & Rancifere, vocals by Barbara Mason, courtesy of Buddah Records
"A Good Man Is Gone," lyrics by Alex Brown, music by Monk Higgins, vocals by Barbara Mason
"She Dit It," lyrics by Alex Brown, music by Monk Higgins, vocals by Barbara Mason
"Three Hoods," by Monk Higgins
"Get Down Sheba," by Monk Higgins
"Railroad," by Monk Higgins
"'Who The Hell Is That?'" by Monk Higgins
Heavy Shot," by Monk Higgins
"Number One Man," by Monk Higgins
"The Shark," by Monk Higgins
"Breast Stroke," by Monk Higgins
"Speedboat," by Monk Higgins
"Good Bye," by Monk Higgins.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Honor
Release Date:
26 March 1975
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 26 March 1975
Production Date:
began 12 August 1974 in Louisville, KY
Copyright Claimant:
American International Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
26 March 1975
Copyright Number:
LP47567
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Movielab
Widescreen/ratio
1:85
Duration(in mins):
90
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
36150
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Louisville, Kentucky, three African American criminals break into the Shayne Loan Company late at night, smash the furniture, and beat up the owner, Andy Shayne. His daughter, Sheba Shayne, receives the news at her detective agency in Chicago, Illinois, and takes an airplane home. Brick Williams, Andy’s partner and Sheba’s former boyfriend, picks her up at the Louisville airport and tells her on the way to the hospital that a crime syndicate has taken over the bookmakers and loan operations in town, but Andy resisted them because Shayne Loan is the only remaining company that makes honest loans to working-class black people. Sheba tells her father she will be staying with him until his business is safe again. A day or two later, at the loan company, Sheba asks her father if she can borrow his car parked outside. As soon as she leaves, Andy receives a telephone call from Pilot, the black gangster trying to take over his business. Fearful that his daughter might get hurt, Andy tells Pilot he is now ready to deal. Pilot gives him a time to meet, and adds that now that they are partners, Andy should not start his car because it is wired with dynamite. Andy and Brick run outside and pull Sheba from the car moments before it blows up. Sheba, a former Louisville policewoman, complains to Lt. Phil Jackson at police headquarters, but he says they do not have enough men to protect her father. She borrows Brick’s car and drives to a factory to interrogate a local low-level criminal. After she beats him, the man reveals there will be a midnight pay-off at the local railroad museum. ... +


In Louisville, Kentucky, three African American criminals break into the Shayne Loan Company late at night, smash the furniture, and beat up the owner, Andy Shayne. His daughter, Sheba Shayne, receives the news at her detective agency in Chicago, Illinois, and takes an airplane home. Brick Williams, Andy’s partner and Sheba’s former boyfriend, picks her up at the Louisville airport and tells her on the way to the hospital that a crime syndicate has taken over the bookmakers and loan operations in town, but Andy resisted them because Shayne Loan is the only remaining company that makes honest loans to working-class black people. Sheba tells her father she will be staying with him until his business is safe again. A day or two later, at the loan company, Sheba asks her father if she can borrow his car parked outside. As soon as she leaves, Andy receives a telephone call from Pilot, the black gangster trying to take over his business. Fearful that his daughter might get hurt, Andy tells Pilot he is now ready to deal. Pilot gives him a time to meet, and adds that now that they are partners, Andy should not start his car because it is wired with dynamite. Andy and Brick run outside and pull Sheba from the car moments before it blows up. Sheba, a former Louisville policewoman, complains to Lt. Phil Jackson at police headquarters, but he says they do not have enough men to protect her father. She borrows Brick’s car and drives to a factory to interrogate a local low-level criminal. After she beats him, the man reveals there will be a midnight pay-off at the local railroad museum. Sheba drives to Brick's apartment to give him the news, and they make love. Later, they drive to the railroad and park. When Pilot and several other gangsters arrive to exchange paperwork for money, Brick scatters them with his car. Sheba chases Pilot, but he escapes and swears vengeance. The next day, in Shayne Loan’s rear office, Brick discovers that a single insurance company indemnified all the loan companies seized by the syndicate. At that moment, four gangsters step into the front office and start shooting. As Andy rushes out to stop them, one man shoots him, and Sheba retaliates by killing three of the henchmen with her automatic pistol. She holds the fourth man prisoner until Lt. Jackson and several policemen arrive. Later, when Andy dies at the hospital, Lt. Jackson tells Sheba that the gunmen were from out of town and the survivor had no idea who hired them. Talking to her old sources, Sheba hears that a black market salesman and loan shark named Walker might know who killed her father. She puts a gun to Walker’s head while he drives through a car wash and forces him to roll down the window and put his head outside. As he approaches the scalding hot wax, Walker confesses that the black syndicate is run by Pilot, who lives at the Towers apartment complex, but that is all he knows. Sheba returns to her father’s house to get her special guns, then goes to the Towers, but several gangsters are waiting because Walker called Pilot to warn him. After a shootout, Pilot and his men chase Sheba into a nearby amusement park, where she isolates Pilot, puts his head on a roller coaster track, and elicits a confession. His boss is a man named Shark, but all Pilot can give her is a telephone number. Sheba discovers it is a “moveable number” for a yacht called the Nu-Tronic, and when she telephones, she talks her way into an invitation for an onboard party. Wearing a sexy gown, she rides a skiff to the yacht in the middle of the Ohio River, joins the party, and meets the owner, Shark Merrill. When Pilot comes aboard to warn Shark, he sees Sheba and identifies her. Sheba dives overboard and swims to her car. She changes into a wetsuit and swims back to the yacht with her machine gun, but Shark’s men subdue her and lock her in the engine room. Sheba finds a rusty old knife and hides the blade in her wetsuit. The next morning, Brick arrives at the loan office and finds Sheba’s note pad with the Nu-Tronic telephone number written on it. Meanwhile, Shark’s men tie Pilot’s hands with one end of a rope and tie the other end to a speedboat. Shark brings Sheba on deck so that she can watch his men drag Pilot through the water at high speed. After Pilot drowns, they cut him loose and his body sinks. Threatening Sheba, Shark gloats that his insurance company now owns the Shayne Loan Company, completing his Louisville monopoly. His men tie her hands and throw her overboard to be towed by the speedboat, but she uses the hidden blade to cut the rope. Climbing aboard the yacht, she tries to capture Shark, but he escapes in a speedboat. She chases after him on a jet ski, just as Lt. Jackson, Brick, and several policemen approach the yacht in a police boat and kill Shark’s henchmen. Commandeering a speedboat, Sheba catches up with Shark and shoots him with a spear gun. Later, Brick asks Sheba to stay in Louisville to help with the loan company, but she returns to Chicago, promising she will visit Brick now and then. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.