Stay Hungry (1976)

R | 103 mins | Comedy-drama | 25 April 1976

Director:

Bob Rafelson

Cinematographer:

Victor J. Kemper

Production Designer:

Toby Carr Rafelson

Production Company:

Outov, Inc.
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HISTORY

       The 14 Apr 1975 DV announced that principal photography would begin on 28 Apr 1975 in Birmingham, AL, for Outov, Inc. productions. An article in the 12 Dec 1975 DV reported that a Feb 1976 release was planned; however, the first confirmed opening was not until 25 Apr 1976, in New York City.
       A news item in the 7 Apr 1976 DV stated that director-producer Bob Rafelson was inspired to make Stay Hungry while hitch-hiking across the U.S., and that he had plans to attempt a similar expedition in the future.
       Stay Hungry garnered mixed reviews. The 23 Apr 1976 HR praised the film for “its bubbling vitality, high spirits and good looks,” while the 12 May 1976 LAT described it as “several movies not quite rolled into one.” Many reviews contrasted actress Sally Field’s television series, The Flying Nun (ABC, 7 Sep 1967 – 18 Sep 1970), with her nude scene in the film, which, according to the Jul 1976 Playboy, could produce “the kind of culture shock that might prompt a devout TV watcher to switch detergents.”
       Although the film’s credits imply that actor Arnold Schwarzenegger was a newcomer to motion pictures, he had already co-starred in Hercules in New York (1970, see entry) credited as “Arnold Strong.”
      End credits conclude with the following written acknowledgements: “Grateful appreciation to the people of Birmingham, Alabama and to the International Federation of Body Builders.” ... More Less

       The 14 Apr 1975 DV announced that principal photography would begin on 28 Apr 1975 in Birmingham, AL, for Outov, Inc. productions. An article in the 12 Dec 1975 DV reported that a Feb 1976 release was planned; however, the first confirmed opening was not until 25 Apr 1976, in New York City.
       A news item in the 7 Apr 1976 DV stated that director-producer Bob Rafelson was inspired to make Stay Hungry while hitch-hiking across the U.S., and that he had plans to attempt a similar expedition in the future.
       Stay Hungry garnered mixed reviews. The 23 Apr 1976 HR praised the film for “its bubbling vitality, high spirits and good looks,” while the 12 May 1976 LAT described it as “several movies not quite rolled into one.” Many reviews contrasted actress Sally Field’s television series, The Flying Nun (ABC, 7 Sep 1967 – 18 Sep 1970), with her nude scene in the film, which, according to the Jul 1976 Playboy, could produce “the kind of culture shock that might prompt a devout TV watcher to switch detergents.”
       Although the film’s credits imply that actor Arnold Schwarzenegger was a newcomer to motion pictures, he had already co-starred in Hercules in New York (1970, see entry) credited as “Arnold Strong.”
      End credits conclude with the following written acknowledgements: “Grateful appreciation to the people of Birmingham, Alabama and to the International Federation of Body Builders.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
26 May 1975.
---
Box Office
26 Apr 1976.
---
Daily Variety
14 Apr 1975.
---
Daily Variety
12 Dec 1975.
p. 1, 4.
Daily Variety
7 Apr 1976.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Apr 1976
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
12 May 1976
Part IV, p. 1, 13.
New York Times
26 Apr 1976.
---
Newsweek
17 May 1976.
---
Playboy
Jul 1976.
---
Time
10 May 1976.
---
Variety
28 Apr 1976
p. 28.
WSJ
3 May 1976.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A film by Bob Rafelson
An Outov, Inc. Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
Asst dir trainee
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Asst cam
Key grip
Dailies by
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Const coord
Scenic artist
COSTUMES
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus ed
Asst to the comp
Asst to the comp
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd eff
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Graphics
MAKEUP
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod coord
Scr continuity
Asst to the dir
Asst to the dir
Loc casting
Secy to the dir
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Stay Hungry by Charles Gaines (Garden City, 1972).
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 April 1976
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 25 April 1976
Los Angeles opening: 12 May 1976
Production Date:
began 28 April 1975 in Birmingham, AL
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Inc.
Copyright Date:
10 April 1976
Copyright Number:
LP46827
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Widescreen/ratio
Cameras by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
103
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
24553
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Craig Blake, the scion of a prominent Birmingham, Alabama, family, rides his horse around the estate he inherited upon his parents’ death five months earlier. In a letter from his Uncle Albert, Craig is offered a job in the steel industry and is urged to abandon the disreputable real estate corporation with which he is involved. The next morning, Craig meets with his business associates, Jabo; Walter, Jr.; Bubba and Hal Foss. Jabo announces that they are on the verge of owning an entire block of downtown Birmingham, which they intend to replace with the city’s largest office building. He assigns the purchase of the last unsold building, the Olympic Spa, to Craig. Upon arriving at his destination, Mary Tate Farnsworth, the receptionist, asks a trainer named Franklin to show Craig around. When Franklin and owner Thor Erickson discuss Craig’s membership, Craig offers to buy the spa. No agreement is reached, but Craig returns Friday night, while Franklin and another employee, Newton, assist Austrian body-builder Joe Santo in his weight training for the “Mr. Universe” competition. Joe invites the group to a neighborhood bar, where they meet Anita, the spa’s karate instructor, and Mary Tate. Craig and Mary Tate get acquainted while dancing but are interrupted by a drunken bar patron, who threatens Craig over an innocent joke. A brawl ensues that leaves Craig with a cut on his left ear. Afterward, Craig invites his new friends to his mansion, and Joe proves himself knowledgeable in identifying the house’s antique furnishings. Following a doubles tennis match with longtime friends Hal, Halsey, Richard Packman and Lester, Craig agrees ... +


Craig Blake, the scion of a prominent Birmingham, Alabama, family, rides his horse around the estate he inherited upon his parents’ death five months earlier. In a letter from his Uncle Albert, Craig is offered a job in the steel industry and is urged to abandon the disreputable real estate corporation with which he is involved. The next morning, Craig meets with his business associates, Jabo; Walter, Jr.; Bubba and Hal Foss. Jabo announces that they are on the verge of owning an entire block of downtown Birmingham, which they intend to replace with the city’s largest office building. He assigns the purchase of the last unsold building, the Olympic Spa, to Craig. Upon arriving at his destination, Mary Tate Farnsworth, the receptionist, asks a trainer named Franklin to show Craig around. When Franklin and owner Thor Erickson discuss Craig’s membership, Craig offers to buy the spa. No agreement is reached, but Craig returns Friday night, while Franklin and another employee, Newton, assist Austrian body-builder Joe Santo in his weight training for the “Mr. Universe” competition. Joe invites the group to a neighborhood bar, where they meet Anita, the spa’s karate instructor, and Mary Tate. Craig and Mary Tate get acquainted while dancing but are interrupted by a drunken bar patron, who threatens Craig over an innocent joke. A brawl ensues that leaves Craig with a cut on his left ear. Afterward, Craig invites his new friends to his mansion, and Joe proves himself knowledgeable in identifying the house’s antique furnishings. Following a doubles tennis match with longtime friends Hal, Halsey, Richard Packman and Lester, Craig agrees to help his cousin, Amy Walterson, find what she calls “authentics,” or country folk, to entertain at her upcoming party. Later, Craig takes his friend, Dorothy Stephens, on a double date to a lakeside barbecue with Joe and Mary Tate. The two couples exchange partners, and Mary Tate teaches Craig to water ski while Dorothy flirts with Joe. That night, Mary Tate and Craig make love. The next morning, William, the butler, is unpleasantly surprised to find Mary Tate in Craig’s bed, but maintains his composure as he performs his duties. Over time, Craig and Mary Tate fall in love and become inseparable. When Craig admits that he has curtailed his efforts to buy the spa, Hal reminds him that they are in business with dangerous men, but Craig is unfazed. Joe and Craig also become close friends, and after seeing Joe play fiddle with a rustic string band, Craig hires the group to perform at Amy party. That night at the spa, Franklin and Anita interrupt a group of intruders hired by Craig’s real estate associates to sabotage the building’s air conditioning system. Craig feels responsible and offers to loan Thor $5,000 to make the necessary repairs. Craig and Mary Tate attend Amy’s party, where Uncle Albert and numerous Blake cousins are in attendance. However, the festivities quickly turns unpleasant when Craig and Hal argue over business, and Mary Tate becomes angered by her boyfriend’s neglect. Meanwhile, Joe’s band is greeted with derision by the partygoers, causing him to end the performance prematurely. Mary Tate is disenchanted with Craig and decides to leave him, though he begs her to stay. The following day, Uncle Albert advises Craig to pursue his life’s goals unsparingly. Later, the Olympic Spa becomes a hive of activity as body-builders register for the Mr. Universe competition, which is to be held the next day at a nearby auditorium. Jabo, Craig’s unscrupulous boss, seizes the opportunity by enticing Thor to sell the club with offers of whiskey and prostitutes. The next day, Mary Tate arrives at work, and Thor, crazed from the previous night’s debauchery, rapes her. Craig enters the spa in search of Mary Tate, and the two men fight each other with weights and exercise equipment. Meanwhile, at the Mr. Universe competition, suspicions arise among the contestants and their managers when Thor fails to appear with the registration money. The scantily-clad bodybuilders run through the streets to the Olympic Spa, but are stopped by curious onlookers, who want to see them pose. When Joe reaches the spa, it is surrounded by police cars and Thor is being taken away in an ambulance. Later, Craig informs Jabo and his associates that he and Joe, now “Mr. Universe,” have purchased the spa and they refuse to sell. In a letter to Uncle Albert, Craig announces that he has sold the house, and has given most of the contents to William, who will be selling them in his new thrift shop. Craig and Mary Tate leave the mansion to live a simple life. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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