Dixie Dynamite (1976)

PG | 90 mins | Drama | 1976

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HISTORY

According to 10 Dec 1975 HR , post production started on 12 Dec 1975.
       Per a 15 Aug 1979 Var article, Wes Bishop and Saber Productions filed a breach of contract lawsuit against Dimension Pictures. The suit claimed Dimension Pictures had agreed to a 50-50 interest in the film and that Dimension would get a 35% distribution fee. In 1976, Toluca Productions wanted to buy the US-Canadian rights to the film for 1.3 million dollars, but Dimension told Bishop the deal was off. However, the plaintiff’s claimed that Dimension then sold the rights anyway for 1 million dollars to Toluca and/or Epoh Productions. They also claimed that Dimension underreported other collections by $60,000. Other transactions were alleged to have been done with Dynamite Films, The Cinema 3 Group, Flora Releasing Corp., William K. Eliscu, and Howard H. Cohen. The plaintiffs asked for 1.5 million dollars in punitive damages and another $100,000 for general and actual damages. The outcome of the lawsuit was not found in the ... More Less

According to 10 Dec 1975 HR , post production started on 12 Dec 1975.
       Per a 15 Aug 1979 Var article, Wes Bishop and Saber Productions filed a breach of contract lawsuit against Dimension Pictures. The suit claimed Dimension Pictures had agreed to a 50-50 interest in the film and that Dimension would get a 35% distribution fee. In 1976, Toluca Productions wanted to buy the US-Canadian rights to the film for 1.3 million dollars, but Dimension told Bishop the deal was off. However, the plaintiff’s claimed that Dimension then sold the rights anyway for 1 million dollars to Toluca and/or Epoh Productions. They also claimed that Dimension underreported other collections by $60,000. Other transactions were alleged to have been done with Dynamite Films, The Cinema 3 Group, Flora Releasing Corp., William K. Eliscu, and Howard H. Cohen. The plaintiffs asked for 1.5 million dollars in punitive damages and another $100,000 for general and actual damages. The outcome of the lawsuit was not found in the research. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
10 Dec 1975.
---
Los Angeles Times
1 Oct 1976.
p. 13.
Variety
15 Aug 1979.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Prod mgr
PRODUCER
Prod
WRITERS
Wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Key grip
Best boy
Still photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Prop master
MUSIC
Mus artist
The Mike Curb Congregation, featuring
Mus artist
Mus artist
Mus artist
Mus artist
SOUND
Rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles and opticals
PRODUCTION MISC
Loc mgr
Prod asst
Scr supv
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
DETAILS
Release Date:
1976
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 29 September 1976
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
90
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Dixie and Patsy catch their father, Tom Eldridge, drinking his homemade moonshine, which Dixie says is o.k. as long he is shipping more than sipping. Tom laughs and gives the girls some money to help Mack get his motorcycle fixed for the big race. After the girls leave, the Sheriff, his deputies and two federal agents arrive and arrest Tom for making whiskey. Tom breaks away and jumps into his car, driving off through a fruit stand and a chicken coop. After an extended chase, Deputy Frank, shoots out Tom's tire, sending his car crashing through a guardrail, tumbling down a steep hill and exploding at the bottom. Later, the Sheriff and one of the IRS agents visit Dade McCutchen at his mansion. While McCutchen relaxes by the pool eating crab, the Sheriff explains about what happened to Tom. McCutchen says to forget about it and hands the Sheriff an envelope filled with money. After the Sheriff storms away, the agent asks if the lawman is going to be a problem, but McCutchen says they won't need him around much longer. At the funeral, Charlie White, the bank manger, offers his condolences and tells Dixie that he has juggled the books so she doesn't have to pay the mortgage on her house for three months. However, the sisters still have to find jobs. After four weeks of futile effort, Mack gets them to go to the big motocross race where he takes second place and wins $200. Across town in a brand new RV, McCutchen tells White that he is taking over the bank. When White protests, McCutchen says that his money makes up over eighty percent of the ... +


Dixie and Patsy catch their father, Tom Eldridge, drinking his homemade moonshine, which Dixie says is o.k. as long he is shipping more than sipping. Tom laughs and gives the girls some money to help Mack get his motorcycle fixed for the big race. After the girls leave, the Sheriff, his deputies and two federal agents arrive and arrest Tom for making whiskey. Tom breaks away and jumps into his car, driving off through a fruit stand and a chicken coop. After an extended chase, Deputy Frank, shoots out Tom's tire, sending his car crashing through a guardrail, tumbling down a steep hill and exploding at the bottom. Later, the Sheriff and one of the IRS agents visit Dade McCutchen at his mansion. While McCutchen relaxes by the pool eating crab, the Sheriff explains about what happened to Tom. McCutchen says to forget about it and hands the Sheriff an envelope filled with money. After the Sheriff storms away, the agent asks if the lawman is going to be a problem, but McCutchen says they won't need him around much longer. At the funeral, Charlie White, the bank manger, offers his condolences and tells Dixie that he has juggled the books so she doesn't have to pay the mortgage on her house for three months. However, the sisters still have to find jobs. After four weeks of futile effort, Mack gets them to go to the big motocross race where he takes second place and wins $200. Across town in a brand new RV, McCutchen tells White that he is taking over the bank. When White protests, McCutchen says that his money makes up over eighty percent of the deposits and, if he takes it out, the bank closes. He then tells White of his plan of having the moonshiners arrested so they can't pay their mortgages. Then, he can acquire all their land to gain access to the large natural gas reserves located underneath the town. To keep his job, White agrees to foreclose on all delinquent properties. The next day, Frank arrests Patsy for shoplifting and drives her out of town where he blackmails her into having sex with him. After her ordeal, Patsy comes home to find that she and Dixie are being evicted. Patsy pleads with the Sheriff that White promised her three months to pay, but the Sheriff says there's nothing he can do. The girls go see White, but he just blames it all on the new owners. That night, Frank answers a call about two drunken pool players busting up a bar. He enters with his gun drawn. One of the men gets pushed against him and Frank's gun goes off, critically wounding the man. When the Sheriff finds out, he fires Frank. A few days later, Dixie and Patsy's house is auctioned off. McCutchen buys it for exactly what the girls owe the bank, leaving them penniless. Mack decides he will go away to do construction work, get some money and then he and the girls will move to California. Before he goes, though, the girls ask Mack to teach them to ride a motorcycle. The next day, the girls go on a robbery spree, stealing two motorcycles from a dealership, a Winchester rifle from a gun shop and a truck full of explosives from a rock quarry. Later, one of McCutchen trucks is hauling moonshine when Dixie and Patsy chase it down on a motorcycle. Patsy throws a stick of dynamite into the back and the truck explodes. A few nights later, McCutchen complains about the girls' illegal antics, but the Sherrif says it's the greedy millionaire's own fault for pushing the town too far. The whole town is now cheering for the girls. Confident from her crime spree, Dixie decides to rob the bank and cut off McCutchen's money supply. Patsy agrees, but says she has one score to settle first. That night, Frank is driving home when the road is blocked by a small tree. When he gets out of his car, Patsy and Dixie pull their guns on him. They force him to kneel and he begs for his life; saying that it was the Sheriff who made him shoot at their father. The girls let him go, but make him promise he won't say he saw them. At home, Frank calls the Sheriff, hoping to get his job back. However, when the Sheriff doesn't oblige, Frank hangs up, curses and goes into the bathroom where he finds a time bomb that blows him through the roof. Five weeks later, Mack returns to find the girls are wanted criminals. He scours the woods until he finds them. They tell him they have been giving most of the stolen money to farmers so they can keep their land. Mack tries to convince them into leaving town, but instead, they talk him into joining them. A few days later, Patsy and Dixie show up at the end of a woman's funeral and steal the body. Later, a pathologist explains his profession to a group of students when he pulls back a sheet and, instead of a cadaver, he finds pillows and an oxygen tank. Meanwhile, Mack pulls up in front of the bank in his truck that now has "Carpet City" stenciled on the side. He pulls a large carpet out from the back and a hand slides out. He pushes the hand back in, and carries the carpet inside the bank. When White says he didn't order a carpet, Mack explains it was sent by McCutchen and then leaves. Dixie and Patsy burst in with guns drawn and say they are robbing the bank. Dixie then calls the Sheriff and says they will kill the hostages if they don't get a getaway car. The girls take a bomb out of the carpet roll and fill a big bag with ones and fives. They then send White out to say they will blow the bank up if they don't get the car in five minutes. As White talks to the Sheriff, the girls fill up a baby carriage with money. Next, the girls pull the two dead women, who are now both dressed exactly like Patsy and Dixie, out of the carpet. The girls then change into frumpy dresses and gray wigs. The Sheriff has gotten the getaway car, which has been filled with only a gallon of gas, but a gauge rigged to say full. The Sheriff moves everyone across the street and yells to the girls that their car is here. Dixie tells the hostages to run out the side of the bank and she will shoot anyone who looks back. The hostages do as they are told and the girls follow right behind them with the baby carriage. The Sheriff is about to go into the bank when the bomb explodes. The Sheriff calls McCutchen and tells him that the explosion has blown up the girls and most of the bank's money. McCutchen tells him not to make a move until he gets there. McCutchen gets into his limousine and the driver tells him that they have to get the car into the shop as he keeps hearing a ticking sound. The car explodes. Much later, the girls are at an outside restaurant in Rio de Janeiro being bored by a stuffy old Englishman. Mack joins them as three bottles of beer arrive. The Englishman asks what line of business they are in and they all swig from their bottles and yell “Banking!” +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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