Kiki (1931)

85-86 or 89 mins | Romantic comedy | 14 March 1931

Director:

Sam Taylor

Writer:

Sam Taylor

Cinematographer:

Karl Struss

Editor:

Allen McNeil

Production Company:

Feature Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

Sam Tayor is credited twice onscreen. His directing credits reads "Samuel Taylor," while his writing credit is "Sam Taylor." According to FD , the film version was altered from the stage version to meet censorship requirements. Joseph M. Schenck produced a silent version of the play in 1926, starring Norma Talmadge and directed by Clarence Brown (see ... More Less

Sam Tayor is credited twice onscreen. His directing credits reads "Samuel Taylor," while his writing credit is "Sam Taylor." According to FD , the film version was altered from the stage version to meet censorship requirements. Joseph M. Schenck produced a silent version of the play in 1926, starring Norma Talmadge and directed by Clarence Brown (see entry). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
8 Mar 31
p. 10.
Motion Picture Herald
21 Feb 31
p. 46.
New York Times
6 Mar 31
p. 16.
Variety
11 Mar 31
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Sam Taylor's Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dramatic dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
Adpt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
MUSIC
Mus dir
DANCE
Dances staged by
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Kiki by André Picard (Paris, 1920) as adapted by David Belasco (New York, 29 Nov 1921).
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 March 1931
Copyright Claimant:
Feature Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
6 March 1931
Copyright Number:
LP2025
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
85-86 or 89
Length(in feet):
8,000
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Before the opening night of the latest version of Randall's Revue, producer Victor Randall and his star and ex-wife, Paulette Vaile, quarrel, but Randall's friend Bunson prevails upon them to go on with the show. While Paulette flirts with her boyfriend Eddie, Victor laments having lost Paulette, whom he still loves, and high-spirited chorus girl Kiki is fired for biting another dancer. Kiki comes to Victor's office and pleads so determinedly for her job that Randall gives her another chance just to keep her quiet. That night, Kiki is distracted by the sight of Victor, whom she loves, and her comic pratfalls enrage the other performers while delighting the audience. After the show, Paulette slaps Kiki and insists on her dismissal, which Victor refuses to rescind when Kiki comes to his office later. Miserable over Paulette's temper, Victor decides to avail himself of Kiki's beauty and takes her to his apartment. When he tries to make love to her, however, she locks herself in the bedroom. The next day, Kiki destroys an apologetic letter from Paulette before Victor sees it, and determines to win him away from Paulette. A week passes and despite all his efforts Victor cannot get Kiki out of his home, even when he attempts to pass her on to his backer, Alfred Rapp. Kiki continues to steal Paulette's letters to Victor, but she is discovered when Alfred asks Victor why he has ignored the letters. Victor, who knows that Paulette is bad for him no matter how much he may desire her, is pleased with Kiki's trick, which encourages her love for him even more. She is disappointed, however, when Victor ... +


Before the opening night of the latest version of Randall's Revue, producer Victor Randall and his star and ex-wife, Paulette Vaile, quarrel, but Randall's friend Bunson prevails upon them to go on with the show. While Paulette flirts with her boyfriend Eddie, Victor laments having lost Paulette, whom he still loves, and high-spirited chorus girl Kiki is fired for biting another dancer. Kiki comes to Victor's office and pleads so determinedly for her job that Randall gives her another chance just to keep her quiet. That night, Kiki is distracted by the sight of Victor, whom she loves, and her comic pratfalls enrage the other performers while delighting the audience. After the show, Paulette slaps Kiki and insists on her dismissal, which Victor refuses to rescind when Kiki comes to his office later. Miserable over Paulette's temper, Victor decides to avail himself of Kiki's beauty and takes her to his apartment. When he tries to make love to her, however, she locks herself in the bedroom. The next day, Kiki destroys an apologetic letter from Paulette before Victor sees it, and determines to win him away from Paulette. A week passes and despite all his efforts Victor cannot get Kiki out of his home, even when he attempts to pass her on to his backer, Alfred Rapp. Kiki continues to steal Paulette's letters to Victor, but she is discovered when Alfred asks Victor why he has ignored the letters. Victor, who knows that Paulette is bad for him no matter how much he may desire her, is pleased with Kiki's trick, which encourages her love for him even more. She is disappointed, however, when Victor speaks to Paulette on the phone and his resolve weakens. He orders Kiki to leave by the time he returns, and Bunson helps her pack. In the lobby, Kiki sees Paulette, and after trapping her in a nearby room, Kiki threatens to kill her if she sees Victor again. Victor and Bunson rescue Paulette, but Kiki pretends to faint and does not rouse when the doctor tends to her. Later that night, the doctor diagnoses a catalyptic trance and orders that she must not be moved, which dismays Victor, who has just received an unexpected visit from an amorous Paulette. Paulette nags Victor until he agrees to leave with her, but her irritating tone, and Kiki's loveliness as she pretends to sleep, move him to stay. Paulette leaves in a huff, after which Kiki explains to Victor how much she loves him. Paulette calls, offering Victor one last chance for a reconciliation, but Victor realizes he adores Kiki and chooses to stay with his madcap darling. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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