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HISTORY

The copyright attributions, “1973 Galaxy Enterprises, Inc.” and “1980 Creative Force Productions, Inc.,” appear at the end of the film.
       End credits offer the following acknowledgments: "Featuring the Voices of: Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., U.S. Senator Robert F. Kennedy, U.S. Senator Wayne Morse, President Richard M. Nixon; The Producers wish to thank The New York City Police Bomb Squad and The University of Miami, Coral Gables for their kind assistance and cooperation."
       Country Joe McDonald is spelled incorrectly in the credits as "Country Joe Macdonald," as is the song title, "I-Feel-Like-I'm-Fixing-To-Die Rag," which is listed as, "Fixin' To Die Rag ('Vietnam Rag')."
       The 8 Apr 1974 Box reported that No Place to Hide, based on a true incident in which a Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) agent thwarted efforts by radical activists to bomb a building in New York City, was set for release by American Films, Ltd. The film premiered at the 1973 Atlanta International Film Festival. The 1 May 1974 Var announced release for late spring 1974.
       According to an 18 Jan 1977 DV, article, No Place to Hide was released “in only three or four sites in 1975.” Director-writer Robert Schnitzer was seeking a new distributor in hopes of capitalizing on the success of writer-actor Sylvester Stallone’s Rocky (1976, see entry).
       A news item the 30 May 1984 DV announced that Schnitzer added an additional story line and new music to No Place to Hide, releasing it on videocassette under the name Rebel. According to the item, ... More Less

The copyright attributions, “1973 Galaxy Enterprises, Inc.” and “1980 Creative Force Productions, Inc.,” appear at the end of the film.
       End credits offer the following acknowledgments: "Featuring the Voices of: Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., U.S. Senator Robert F. Kennedy, U.S. Senator Wayne Morse, President Richard M. Nixon; The Producers wish to thank The New York City Police Bomb Squad and The University of Miami, Coral Gables for their kind assistance and cooperation."
       Country Joe McDonald is spelled incorrectly in the credits as "Country Joe Macdonald," as is the song title, "I-Feel-Like-I'm-Fixing-To-Die Rag," which is listed as, "Fixin' To Die Rag ('Vietnam Rag')."
       The 8 Apr 1974 Box reported that No Place to Hide, based on a true incident in which a Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) agent thwarted efforts by radical activists to bomb a building in New York City, was set for release by American Films, Ltd. The film premiered at the 1973 Atlanta International Film Festival. The 1 May 1974 Var announced release for late spring 1974.
       According to an 18 Jan 1977 DV, article, No Place to Hide was released “in only three or four sites in 1975.” Director-writer Robert Schnitzer was seeking a new distributor in hopes of capitalizing on the success of writer-actor Sylvester Stallone’s Rocky (1976, see entry).
       A news item the 30 May 1984 DV announced that Schnitzer added an additional story line and new music to No Place to Hide, releasing it on videocassette under the name Rebel. According to the item, the film was produced in 1972 for under $100,000.
       An article in the 6 Jun 1986 LAT reported that Rebel was enjoying worldwide distribution, due primarily to the popularity of Stallone’s character, “Rambo.” The article stated that Schnitzer based the film on his own experiences as a radical in the 1960s. The director also said that Stallone assisted with writing the screenplay, and had a penchant for removing his shirt on set. The budget for the film was described as “less than $500,000,” and Stallone was compensated as a profit participant. To ensure a PG-rating for Rebel, Schnitzer removed the only nude scene that appeared in the original edit. Stallone was among 800 candidates for the role of “Jerry Savage"; according to a 19 Jan 1987 People news item, comedian Richard Pryor was among that group.
       An 11 Aug 1989 LAHExam brief reported that the rights to Rebel had been acquired by a group headed by producer Jerry Hilton, called “Anonymous Rebel Filmmakers.” Spoofing the original film, A. R. F. created a new script, shot new footage, recorded new dialogue, and included several outtakes, releasing it under the title, A Man Called…Rainbo, on their Section Eight Video label. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
8 Apr 1974.
---
Daily Variety
18 Jan 1977.
---
Daily Variety
30 May 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Apr 1986.
---
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
11 Aug 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
6 Jun 1986
p. 6, Part IV.
People
19 Jan 1987.
---
Variety
1 May 1974.
---
Variety
22 May 1974.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Robert Schnitzer film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr, 2d unit
Prod mgr, 2d unit Miami
Asst dir
1st asst dir, 2d unit Los Angeles
2d asst dir, 2d unit Los Angeles
Assoc dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Asst cam/Gaffer
Asst cam, 2d unit Los Angeles
Asst cam, 2d unit Miami
Gaffer, 2d unit Los Angeles
Gaffer, 2d unit Miami
Key grip
Grip, 2d unit Los Angeles
Grip, 2d unit Miami
Still photog
Still photog, 2d unit Los Angeles
Still photog, 2d unit Miami
FILM EDITORS
Assoc ed
Ed consultant
Ed asst
SET DECORATORS
Props, 2d unit Miami
Props, 2d unit Miami
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Source mus adv
Mus score rec
Courtesy
Belly dance music
Addl flute solo
Guitar picking
SOUND
Sd, 2d unit Los Angeles
Sd, 2d unit Miami
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Opticals
Titles
MAKEUP
Make-up
Make-up, 2d unit Los Angeles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Scr supv
Scr supv, 2d unit Los Angeles
Asst scr supv
Asst scr supv
Prod staff
Prod staff
Transportation
Transportation
Transportation
Prod coord, 2d unit Miami
Prod asst, 2d unit Miami
Post prod supv
Financial consultants
SOURCES
SONGS
"I-Feel-Like-I'm-Fixin'-To-Die Rag," written by Country Joe McDonald, performed by Country Joe MacDonald and Barry Melton
"Carry It On," written by Gil Turner, performed by Joan Baez
"Crimson and Clover," written by Tommy James and Peter Lucia, Jr., performed by Tommy James and the Shondells, courtesy of Roulette Records
+
SONGS
"I-Feel-Like-I'm-Fixin'-To-Die Rag," written by Country Joe McDonald, performed by Country Joe MacDonald and Barry Melton
"Carry It On," written by Gil Turner, performed by Joan Baez
"Crimson and Clover," written by Tommy James and Peter Lucia, Jr., performed by Tommy James and the Shondells, courtesy of Roulette Records
"Worst That Could Happen," written by Jim Webb, performed by The Brooklyn Bridge, courtesy of Buddah Records
"Simon Says," written by Elliot Chiprut, performed by The 1910 Fruitgum Company, courtesy of Buddah Records
"Gimme Gimme Good Lovin'," written by Ritchie Cordell and Joey Levine, performed by Crazy Elephant, courtesy of Kaskat Music
"Thief in the Night," performed by Michael Corbett & Jay Hirsh, courtesy of the artists
"When You're Near Me," performed by Ken Norris, courtesy of the artist
"My Country 'Tis of Thee," performed by The Church Choir of St. Martin of Tours, Los Angeles.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Rebel
Release Date:
1976
Premiere Information:
Atlanta International Film Festival screening: October 1973
Los Angeles opening: 6 September 1976
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
84
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In October 1969, anti-war activist Jerry Savage accepts a ride from a group of hippies, on their way to New York City to sell their wares. In their van, he takes an instant liking to Laurie, a sweet-natured girl who makes jewelry. Meanwhile, at a New York City dance studio, Estelle Ferguson receives a phone call, informing her that “the merchandise has arrived,” which she collects from a chemical company later that evening. The next day, Jerry meets his friend, Tommy Trafler, at a park. They arrange to discuss their business at Tommy’s office in the warehouse district. Later, Estelle and taxi driver Ray Brown arrive at Tommy’s office, along with Jerry. Ray criticizes Estelle for storing dynamite in her car and demands an explanation for the absence of Marlena St. James, but Tommy assures Ray that Marlena can be trusted. Jerry reluctantly accepts an invitation to stay with Estelle. The following day, Jerry and Estelle pose as tourists while they study the layout of the headquarters of Morris and Ray Metals, a cookware company that also builds personal detention cells called “tiger cages,” used to imprison, bury and drown enemy combatants in Vietnam. At the New York offices of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), agents James Henderson and Chuck Bradley view film footage of buildings destroyed by Marlena, who is known as “Miss M” and “The Black Bomber.” Her most recent target was a university building where germ warfare research was being conducted. However, none of her bombings resulted in death or injury. Aware that Marlena is in New York City, the FBI has acquired ... +


In October 1969, anti-war activist Jerry Savage accepts a ride from a group of hippies, on their way to New York City to sell their wares. In their van, he takes an instant liking to Laurie, a sweet-natured girl who makes jewelry. Meanwhile, at a New York City dance studio, Estelle Ferguson receives a phone call, informing her that “the merchandise has arrived,” which she collects from a chemical company later that evening. The next day, Jerry meets his friend, Tommy Trafler, at a park. They arrange to discuss their business at Tommy’s office in the warehouse district. Later, Estelle and taxi driver Ray Brown arrive at Tommy’s office, along with Jerry. Ray criticizes Estelle for storing dynamite in her car and demands an explanation for the absence of Marlena St. James, but Tommy assures Ray that Marlena can be trusted. Jerry reluctantly accepts an invitation to stay with Estelle. The following day, Jerry and Estelle pose as tourists while they study the layout of the headquarters of Morris and Ray Metals, a cookware company that also builds personal detention cells called “tiger cages,” used to imprison, bury and drown enemy combatants in Vietnam. At the New York offices of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), agents James Henderson and Chuck Bradley view film footage of buildings destroyed by Marlena, who is known as “Miss M” and “The Black Bomber.” Her most recent target was a university building where germ warfare research was being conducted. However, none of her bombings resulted in death or injury. Aware that Marlena is in New York City, the FBI has acquired a civilian infiltrator assigned to entrap her. The infiltrator is someone known and trusted among the radical group, "The Weathermen," able to report on the activities of cell members without fear of detection. Meanwhile, Tommy, Jerry, Estelle and Ray discuss their target, Morris and Ray Metals. The first step in their operation is to steal copies of the government contracts, which will be released to the press to coincide with the bombing. Tommy argues that this step is unnecessary, but Jerry insists that the public needs to understand why the bombing occurred, otherwise it would be perceived as a wanton act of destruction. On a ferryboat across New York Harbor, Tommy and Marlena rekindle an old romance. She knows that the government is following her, and Tommy offers to abort the mission, but she is dedicated to the cause. Elsewhere in the city, Jerry finds Laurie at her jewelry stand, and she invites him to spend the weekend at her communal house in the country. There, Jerry and Laurie discuss their approaches to life. She has found peace, and sees her jewelry designs as metaphors for the universe. Jerry believes he can change the world and is determined to bring about peace at any cost. Laurie argues that only God and love can change the world, and she chides Jerry for sounding like a military general. Meanwhile, Marlena constructs her bomb, instructs Estelle how to detonate it, and warns that any sudden shock could cause it to explode prematurely. In Washington, D. C., journalist Richard Scott enters the office of William Decker, an FBI official in charge of special operations. Scott questions Decker on reports of domestic spying, which implicate Decker’s office as the liaison between the FBI and the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). The official denies the allegations, but explains that his special operations address the problem of the Weathermen, former members of the pacifist Students for a Democratic Society who have formed a network of autonomous cells with no central authority, some of which have resorted to terrorism. When Jerry returns to New York City, his cohorts express resentment about his absence, and Tommy threatens to call off the mission, but Jerry stands by his commitment. After Tommy assures the group that copies of the contracts have been mailed to every major news outlet, he reviews the details of their mission, as an FBI tape recorder documents the conversation. Afterward, Marlena informs Tommy that she will leave town by morning, but declines to reveal her destination. That night, when Jerry returns to Estelle’s apartment, she seduces him by performing a belly dance, and later tells him the story of how, following a miscarriage, she kept the fetus in a milk bottle for several days. As the sun rises, the cell members embark on their operation. Meanwhile, in Washington, Decker secretly meets with Scott and offers the reporter an exclusive story on the failed bombing of the Morris and Ray building. In return, Scott promises to place a four-week moratorium on any news that might connect the FBI with illicit activities involving the White House or the CIA. In New York City, Tommy gives Estelle a fake bomb and drives her to her destination. He receives his final payment and a new identity from FBI agent Henderson, then returns to the office to pack his suitcase. When Marlena walks in on Tommy and notices the unmailed contracts, she realizes that he is an informant. She warns Jerry, who escapes in Estelle’s car to the commune, unaware that the gift-wrapped package in the back seat is the real bomb. Estelle is trapped inside the Morris and Ray building as FBI agents surround her. They follow her to the roof, where she jumps to her death. Meanwhile, agents storm Tommy’s office, but all of the surviving cell members have fled. When Jerry arrives at the commune, the house is empty. While he searches the grounds, Laurie returns and notices the package in the car. She examines it and places it back in the car, but is killed by the subsequent explosion. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.