Sweepstakes (1931)

75-77 mins | Drama | 10 July 1931

Director:

Albert S. Rogell

Writer:

Lew Lipton

Cinematographer:

Edward Snyder

Editor:

Joseph I. Kane

Production Designer:

Carroll Clark

Production Company:

RKO Pathé Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was The Whoop-te-doo Kid . Charles R. Rogers made his producing debut at RKO Pathé with this picture. Var incorrectly lists Mike Donlin in the role of "The Dude," a part credited on screen to Tom Jackson. It is not known if Donlin appeared in another role in the film. A FD news item lists Luis Alberni, George Kuwa, Armand Kaliz, Tyler Brooke, Michael Visaroff, Russ Powell and George Harris as cast members, but their participation in the final film has not been ... More Less

The working title of this film was The Whoop-te-doo Kid . Charles R. Rogers made his producing debut at RKO Pathé with this picture. Var incorrectly lists Mike Donlin in the role of "The Dude," a part credited on screen to Tom Jackson. It is not known if Donlin appeared in another role in the film. A FD news item lists Luis Alberni, George Kuwa, Armand Kaliz, Tyler Brooke, Michael Visaroff, Russ Powell and George Harris as cast members, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
12 May 31
p. 6.
Film Daily
20 May 31
p. 21.
Film Daily
28 Jun 31
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jun 31
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
13 Jun 31
p. 31.
New York Times
25 Jun 31
p. 23.
Variety
30 Jun 31
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Charles R. Rogers Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOUND
Sd eng
SOURCES
SONGS
"How About Me Calling You My Sweetheart?" words and music by Ted Snyder and Mort Harris.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Whoop-te-doo Kid
Release Date:
10 July 1931
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 25 June 1931
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Pathé Distributing Corp.
Copyright Date:
10 July 1931
Copyright Number:
LP2344
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Photophone System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
75-77
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

After his twenty-first birthday party, ace jockey Buddy Doyle, who is known as the "Whoop-te-doo Kid" because he sings the phrase to his horse during competition, defies the curfew of his trainer, Sleepy Jones, and sneaks out of his rooming house to visit nightclub singer Babe Ellis. When Sleepy hears the popular Buddy in a radio broadcast from the inn where Babe works, he retrieves his charge and warns him about the dangers of womanhood. Buddy, however, ignores Sleepy's advice and sneaks out every night to see Babe at the inn. Concerned that Buddy's social life will affect his performance in the upcoming Camden Stakes, horse owner Pop Blake, who is also Buddy's foster father, tells him that unless he ends his romance with Babe, he will be replaced in the lineup. Furious, Buddy takes Babe's suggestion that he quit Pop's stable and ride for Wally Weber, the owner of the inn. Although Buddy insists that Weber use another jockey in the Camden Stakes, Weber tricks him into riding against Blake's ace horse, Six Shooter. In retaliation, Buddy sings to Six Shooter during the race, which inspires the horse to win. Afterward, the judges accuse Buddy of throwing the race and suspend him indefinitely from competition. Kicked out of every racing circuit in the United States, Buddy ends up working as a singing waiter in Tijuana, Mexico. Eventually Sleepy tracks down Buddy and convinces the owners of the bar where he works to buy Six Shooter and enter him in the Tijuana Handicap. Although his suspension has been lifted, Buddy, recalling his previous humiliations, refuses to ride his old horse until Babe, who ... +


After his twenty-first birthday party, ace jockey Buddy Doyle, who is known as the "Whoop-te-doo Kid" because he sings the phrase to his horse during competition, defies the curfew of his trainer, Sleepy Jones, and sneaks out of his rooming house to visit nightclub singer Babe Ellis. When Sleepy hears the popular Buddy in a radio broadcast from the inn where Babe works, he retrieves his charge and warns him about the dangers of womanhood. Buddy, however, ignores Sleepy's advice and sneaks out every night to see Babe at the inn. Concerned that Buddy's social life will affect his performance in the upcoming Camden Stakes, horse owner Pop Blake, who is also Buddy's foster father, tells him that unless he ends his romance with Babe, he will be replaced in the lineup. Furious, Buddy takes Babe's suggestion that he quit Pop's stable and ride for Wally Weber, the owner of the inn. Although Buddy insists that Weber use another jockey in the Camden Stakes, Weber tricks him into riding against Blake's ace horse, Six Shooter. In retaliation, Buddy sings to Six Shooter during the race, which inspires the horse to win. Afterward, the judges accuse Buddy of throwing the race and suspend him indefinitely from competition. Kicked out of every racing circuit in the United States, Buddy ends up working as a singing waiter in Tijuana, Mexico. Eventually Sleepy tracks down Buddy and convinces the owners of the bar where he works to buy Six Shooter and enter him in the Tijuana Handicap. Although his suspension has been lifted, Buddy, recalling his previous humiliations, refuses to ride his old horse until Babe, who has put up Six Shooter's entrance fee, begs him to try to overcome his fears. Inspired by Babe and Sleepy's devotion, Buddy finds his courage and wins the race. A few years later, Buddy and Babe are the proud parents of a budding "Whoop-te-doo Kid." +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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