Loving Couples (1980)

PG | 97 mins | Romantic comedy | 24 October 1980

Director:

Jack Smight

Writer:

Martin Donovan

Producer:

Renée Valente

Cinematographer:

Philip Lathrop

Production Designer:

Jan Scott

Production Company:

Time Life Films
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HISTORY

A brief in the 17 Jul 1979 DV announced that principal photography would begin 30 Jul 1979 in various Southern CA locations. According to a 4 Jul 1979 DV news item, the production was scheduled for ten weeks. The 10 Aug 1979 HR reported that the production would also film in San Diego, CA, but noted the many film permits needed for filming in Los Angeles, CA, inconvenienced filmmakers. However, they were fortunate to receive permission for a five-day shoot at the Marion Davies estate off Coldwater Canyon for a fee of $60,000 with additional security charges.
       According to a brief in the 23 Aug 1979 LAT, Shirley MacLaine, a professional dancer, worked with choreographer Larry Vickers, a dancer from her stage show, to portray awkwardness during a sequence involving disco dancing lessons.
       While the 12-18 Nov Village Voice and the Nov 1980 Film Journal reviews praised MacLaine’s charismatic performance, the 10 Nov 1980 Time, 24 Oct 1980 NYT, and 5 Nov 1980 MPHPD criticized the picture for having a weak script, unflattering photography, and one-note ... More Less

A brief in the 17 Jul 1979 DV announced that principal photography would begin 30 Jul 1979 in various Southern CA locations. According to a 4 Jul 1979 DV news item, the production was scheduled for ten weeks. The 10 Aug 1979 HR reported that the production would also film in San Diego, CA, but noted the many film permits needed for filming in Los Angeles, CA, inconvenienced filmmakers. However, they were fortunate to receive permission for a five-day shoot at the Marion Davies estate off Coldwater Canyon for a fee of $60,000 with additional security charges.
       According to a brief in the 23 Aug 1979 LAT, Shirley MacLaine, a professional dancer, worked with choreographer Larry Vickers, a dancer from her stage show, to portray awkwardness during a sequence involving disco dancing lessons.
       While the 12-18 Nov Village Voice and the Nov 1980 Film Journal reviews praised MacLaine’s charismatic performance, the 10 Nov 1980 Time, 24 Oct 1980 NYT, and 5 Nov 1980 MPHPD criticized the picture for having a weak script, unflattering photography, and one-note characterizations.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
4 Jul 1979.
---
Daily Variety
17 Jul 1979.
---
Film Journal
Nov 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 1979.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Sep 1980
p. 18.
Los Angeles Times
23 Aug 1979.
---
Los Angeles Times
24 Oct 1980
Part VI, p. 1, 13.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
5 Nov 1980.
---
New York Times
24 Oct 1980
Section C, p. 6.
Playboy
Sep 1980.
---
Time
10 Nov 1980.
---
Variety
10 Sep 1980
p. 34.
Village Voice
12-18 Nov 1980.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Time-Life Films Presents
A David Susskind Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Best boy
Key grip
2d grip
Dolly grip
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
Addl ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst props
COSTUMES
Miss MacLaine's ward
Cost coord
Women's ward
MUSIC
Title song lyrics by
All songs [except "Bass Odyssey"] prod and arr
"Bass Odyssey" prod and arr
Mus coord
Mus ed, LaDa Prod., Inc.
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom man
Creative sd services by
Re-rec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles des
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairdresser
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Exec in charge of prod
Post prod supv
Scr supv
Prod coord
Auditor
Post prod coord
Post prod coord
Prod consultant
Transportation coord
Transportation coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
SONGS
“And So It Begins,” lyrics by Norman Gimbel, music by Fred Karlin, sung by Syreeta
“I’ll Make It With Your Love,” lyrics by Norman Gimbel, music by Fred Karlin, sung by Billy Preston
“Take Me Away,” lyrics by Dean Pitchford, music by Fred Karlin, sung by The Temptations
+
SONGS
“And So It Begins,” lyrics by Norman Gimbel, music by Fred Karlin, sung by Syreeta
“I’ll Make It With Your Love,” lyrics by Norman Gimbel, music by Fred Karlin, sung by Billy Preston
“Take Me Away,” lyrics by Dean Pitchford, music by Fred Karlin, sung by The Temptations
“There’s More Where That Came From,” lyrics by Dean Pitchford, music by Fred Karlin, sung by The Temptations
“Turn Up The Music,” lyrics by Dean Pitchford, music by Fred Karlin, sung by Syreeta
“Bass Odyssey,” lyrics by Gregory Wright, music by Gregory Wright, sung by Jermaine Jackson.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 October 1980
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 24 October 1980
Production Date:
began 30 July 1979 in Southern CA locations
Copyright Claimant:
Time Life Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
30 April 1981
Copyright Number:
PA100345
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses/Prints
Lenses & Panaflex® Camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
97
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On a pastoral canyon road in Los Angeles, California, realtor Greg Plunkett gets into a car accident after waving hello to a stranger on horseback, Dr. Evelyn Lucas Kirby. Evelyn uses her own shirt to stop Greg’s bleeding, then rides to a phone to call for help. At night, Evelyn’s surgeon husband, Walter Kirby, arrives home late as usual, and barely listens to details about the accident and how Evelyn had Greg transported to a hospital. At a restaurant, colleagues invite Walter to an out-of-town medical conference, which ruins the couple’s upcoming weekend plans. Evelyn is angry and later rejects her husband’s attempts at romance. At the hospital, Evelyn discharges Greg. Although he wants to see her again, she informs him that their relationship is strictly professional. However, Gregg persists and as he and Evelyn meet on horseback he is thrown from a horse in the same pasture near his recent accident. As Evelyn checks him for injuries, he invites her to lunch and despite her reluctance, they dine on a picnic basket he produces from the trunk of his car. She is won over by his charm and he kisses her. Meanwhile, Stephanie Beck, a TV12 weatherwoman, poses as a new patient and informs Walter that Greg, Stephanie’s boyfriend, and Evelyn are having an affair. Walter and Stephanie spy on the lovers frolicking at the beach. Afterward, Stephanie buys Walter a drink, and he confesses his shock that his marriage is in trouble. He cannot fathom why Evelyn is attracted to Greg. Both he and Stephanie discover they have been monogamous, and end up at a motel to have sex. In the evening, ... +


On a pastoral canyon road in Los Angeles, California, realtor Greg Plunkett gets into a car accident after waving hello to a stranger on horseback, Dr. Evelyn Lucas Kirby. Evelyn uses her own shirt to stop Greg’s bleeding, then rides to a phone to call for help. At night, Evelyn’s surgeon husband, Walter Kirby, arrives home late as usual, and barely listens to details about the accident and how Evelyn had Greg transported to a hospital. At a restaurant, colleagues invite Walter to an out-of-town medical conference, which ruins the couple’s upcoming weekend plans. Evelyn is angry and later rejects her husband’s attempts at romance. At the hospital, Evelyn discharges Greg. Although he wants to see her again, she informs him that their relationship is strictly professional. However, Gregg persists and as he and Evelyn meet on horseback he is thrown from a horse in the same pasture near his recent accident. As Evelyn checks him for injuries, he invites her to lunch and despite her reluctance, they dine on a picnic basket he produces from the trunk of his car. She is won over by his charm and he kisses her. Meanwhile, Stephanie Beck, a TV12 weatherwoman, poses as a new patient and informs Walter that Greg, Stephanie’s boyfriend, and Evelyn are having an affair. Walter and Stephanie spy on the lovers frolicking at the beach. Afterward, Stephanie buys Walter a drink, and he confesses his shock that his marriage is in trouble. He cannot fathom why Evelyn is attracted to Greg. Both he and Stephanie discover they have been monogamous, and end up at a motel to have sex. In the evening, Evelyn tells Walter she is going to spend the weekend alone in Palm Springs, California, to finish her article for a medical journal. When Walter finds out from Stephanie that Greg is also going to Palm Springs on business, the couple takes their own weekend trip to a resort in San Diego, California. As they claim two chaise lounges by the pool, they are unaware that Evelyn and Greg are vacationing at the same hotel. Soon, the two sets of lovers cross paths in the pool and agree to go to the bar for drinks, where the couples decide to leave with their original partners. At home, Evelyn asks Walter for a separation, and kicks him out of the house for suggesting that all would be well if they fine-tuned their sex life. Later, Walter visits Stephanie at the television station and she invites him to her place for dinner. There, Walter learns that Greg has moved in with Evelyn, and he later spies on his wife and her lover. While Greg teaches Evelyn to disco, Walter comes to the house to get his exercise bicycle and sees Greg’s possessions everywhere. One day, Greg takes Evelyn to a hip boutique to shop for an upcoming medical benefit. She tries on one colorful outfit after another while Greg fends off Mrs. Charlotte Liggett, an ex-client with whom he had a short tryst. Later, Walter and Stephanie exchange pleasantries with Evelyn and Greg at the medical benefit where Evelyn is the host. When Greg buys a round of drinks, he runs into Charlotte, whose husband is a doctor. Greg discourages Charlotte’s advances and disappears into the crowd until he finds Stephanie. They exchange compliments and kiss, while Walter admires Evelyn’s elegant gown and they dance. When the music switches to disco, Greg and Evelyn enjoy themselves much to Walter’s displeasure. Later, Charlotte visits Evelyn at her office and warns her that Greg is not faithful, and still has feelings for Stephanie, but Evelyn does not believe her. However, Evelyn realizes that she and Greg are too different to succeed as a couple and breaks off their relationship. Soon, Stephanie comes to the same conclusion about Walter. Both men independently check into the same hotel to sort out their lives and share a drink. Greg gives Walter some pointers on the art of seduction. Afterward, Walter dresses in a cowboy outfit and saunters on horseback to Evelyn, who is sitting in traffic on her way home from work. Walter professes he has never stopped loving Evelyn and there is nothing that can be done about it except seize the moment. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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