Melody Parade (1943)

72-73 or 76 mins | Musical | 27 August 1943

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HISTORY

The song "Serenade to a Jitterbug" by Eddie Cherkose and Edward Kay is listed in copyright records, but was not heard in the ... More Less

The song "Serenade to a Jitterbug" by Eddie Cherkose and Edward Kay is listed in copyright records, but was not heard in the film. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
14 Aug 1943.
---
Daily Variety
4 Aug 43
p. 3.
Film Daily
11 Aug 43
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Apr 43
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Aug 43
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
7 Aug 43
p. 34.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
29 May 43
p. 1339.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
14 Aug 43
p. 1482.
Variety
18 Aug 43
p. 26.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Tech dir
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Sd dir
DANCE
Prod routines staged by
PRODUCTION MISC
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Woman Behind the Man Behind the Gun," "Don't Fall in Love," "Whatever Possessed Me," "Mr. and Mrs. Commando," "Speechless" and "Amigo," words and music by Eddie Cherkose and Edward Kay
"When It's Sleepy Time Down South," words and music by Leon René, Otis René and Clarence Muse
"Them There Eyes," words and music by Maceo Pinkard, Doris Tauber and William Tracey
+
SONGS
"The Woman Behind the Man Behind the Gun," "Don't Fall in Love," "Whatever Possessed Me," "Mr. and Mrs. Commando," "Speechless" and "Amigo," words and music by Eddie Cherkose and Edward Kay
"When It's Sleepy Time Down South," words and music by Leon René, Otis René and Clarence Muse
"Them There Eyes," words and music by Maceo Pinkard, Doris Tauber and William Tracey
"Watcha Know Joe?" composers undetermined.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
27 August 1943
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 13 August 1943
Production Date:
12 April--late April 1943
Copyright Claimant:
Monogram Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
15 July 1943
Copyright Number:
LP12207
Duration(in mins):
72-73 or 76
Length(in feet):
6,836
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9348
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Jimmy Tracy is a busboy at the Hollywood Melody Club, but poses as an agent and talent scout when he meets the new hat check girl, Anne O'Rourke. Although Jimmy tells her that he can arrange a singing audition for her with the club's operator, Happy Harrington, Happy is beset by creditors, as the club's owner, Jonathan Brewster, an eccentric inventor, has just died. Happy is informed that Gloria Brewster, the sole heir, is on her way to Hollywood to settle the club's affairs. Jimmy meets the scatterbrained Gloria first and arranges for Anne to audition with another of his protégés, pianist Skidmore, the club's janitor. After Happy tells Anne that Jimmy is not an agent, he finally meets Gloria and invites her, and the creditors, to dinner at the club. When Gloria reveals that her aunt, Gloria Brewster III, is the real heiress, the creditors circle once again. Unknown to Happy, Jimmy had persuaded Gloria to send a telegram to New York impresario Count Du Val, offering him a large sum of money to come to Los Angeles to produce a new show for the club. Just as Happy is about to announce the club's closure, the count arrives. Before he discovers the truth, however, Gloria receives a telegram stating that a syndicate wants to buy one of her uncle's inventions and is offering two million dollars, and the club stays open. Du Val decides to retain most of the current company including singer/dancer Armida, but will make more lavish costumes and also bring in singer Jerry Cooper. After Jimmy, who has promised Anne and Skidmore parts in the revue, persuades Du Val to hear Anne ... +


Jimmy Tracy is a busboy at the Hollywood Melody Club, but poses as an agent and talent scout when he meets the new hat check girl, Anne O'Rourke. Although Jimmy tells her that he can arrange a singing audition for her with the club's operator, Happy Harrington, Happy is beset by creditors, as the club's owner, Jonathan Brewster, an eccentric inventor, has just died. Happy is informed that Gloria Brewster, the sole heir, is on her way to Hollywood to settle the club's affairs. Jimmy meets the scatterbrained Gloria first and arranges for Anne to audition with another of his protégés, pianist Skidmore, the club's janitor. After Happy tells Anne that Jimmy is not an agent, he finally meets Gloria and invites her, and the creditors, to dinner at the club. When Gloria reveals that her aunt, Gloria Brewster III, is the real heiress, the creditors circle once again. Unknown to Happy, Jimmy had persuaded Gloria to send a telegram to New York impresario Count Du Val, offering him a large sum of money to come to Los Angeles to produce a new show for the club. Just as Happy is about to announce the club's closure, the count arrives. Before he discovers the truth, however, Gloria receives a telegram stating that a syndicate wants to buy one of her uncle's inventions and is offering two million dollars, and the club stays open. Du Val decides to retain most of the current company including singer/dancer Armida, but will make more lavish costumes and also bring in singer Jerry Cooper. After Jimmy, who has promised Anne and Skidmore parts in the revue, persuades Du Val to hear Anne sing, she is offered a contract. However, Happy has to tell Du Val that Armida's manager put a clause in her contract stipulating that she is to be the only female singer in the show, and Du Val is forced to reject Anne. When Jimmy hears this, he quits the club. Later, Anne finds him working as a busboy at another club and persuades him to return to the Melody Club, whose revue is opening the next evening. Still scheming, Jimmy convinces Skidmore to slip a sleeping pill into one of the drinks for the Morgan Trio, so he will be able to replace one of them on stage. However, the stage manager switches the trio's dressing room with Armida's, and she takes the drink and passes out. Gloria is pressed into service and performs a song as a stalling measure, then Anne gets her chance, substituting for Armida. Happy is so pleased with the way things are going that he proposes to Gloria. Skidmore, meanwhile, tries to drug the trio again, but becomes confused about which glass contains the "mickey" and drinks it himself. Happy then overhears Jimmy telling Anne about how Armida became incapacitated, and fires him again. When Anne threatens to leave, however, he rehires him. Later, after Gloria receives another telegram stating that the syndicate has withdrawn its offer as her uncle's invention has proven worthless, Happy passes out. Jimmy and Anne, however, intend to marry. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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