Jaws 2 (1978)

PG | 116 mins | Horror | 16 June 1978

Director:

Jeannot Szwarc

Cinematographer:

Michael Butler

Production Designer:

Joe Alves

Production Company:

Universal Pictures
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HISTORY

Shortly after the enormous success of Steven Spielberg’s Jaws (1975, see entry), a 22 Jul 1975 DV news item reported that a sequel was approved for development. Steven Spielberg turned down Universal’s offer to direct, however, stating at the San Francisco Film Festival that “making a sequel to anything is just a cheap Carney trick”, according to a 21 Oct 1975 DV article. By spring 1976, John Hancock was signed to direct, as stated in a 28 May 1976 HR news item.
       Principal photography was scheduled to begin in spring 1977 in Martha’s Vineyard, MA - the same location the original film was shot. Universal projected a 1978 release according to a 31 May 1976 Box news item. A 13 May 1977 DV article announced a 6 Jun 1977 start date with a projected twenty-week schedule. Filming would begin in Martha’s Vineyard then move to Pensacola, FL. Director Hancock hired his wife, Dorothy Tristan, to re-write Howard Sackler’s early draft of the screenplay.
       Susan Ford, the daughter of former U.S. President Gerald Ford, dropped out of college to work on the production as a “special photographer” according to a 27 Jun 1977 Time news item.
       A 27 Jun 1977 DV article reported that, three weeks into production, Hancock withdrew from the picture due to creative differences. Although directors John Frankenheimer and Otto Preminger were considered as replacements, and Steven Spielberg offered to step in, himself, "for a hefty fee," Hancock was replaced by French director Jeannot Szwarc, who was best known for his television ... More Less

Shortly after the enormous success of Steven Spielberg’s Jaws (1975, see entry), a 22 Jul 1975 DV news item reported that a sequel was approved for development. Steven Spielberg turned down Universal’s offer to direct, however, stating at the San Francisco Film Festival that “making a sequel to anything is just a cheap Carney trick”, according to a 21 Oct 1975 DV article. By spring 1976, John Hancock was signed to direct, as stated in a 28 May 1976 HR news item.
       Principal photography was scheduled to begin in spring 1977 in Martha’s Vineyard, MA - the same location the original film was shot. Universal projected a 1978 release according to a 31 May 1976 Box news item. A 13 May 1977 DV article announced a 6 Jun 1977 start date with a projected twenty-week schedule. Filming would begin in Martha’s Vineyard then move to Pensacola, FL. Director Hancock hired his wife, Dorothy Tristan, to re-write Howard Sackler’s early draft of the screenplay.
       Susan Ford, the daughter of former U.S. President Gerald Ford, dropped out of college to work on the production as a “special photographer” according to a 27 Jun 1977 Time news item.
       A 27 Jun 1977 DV article reported that, three weeks into production, Hancock withdrew from the picture due to creative differences. Although directors John Frankenheimer and Otto Preminger were considered as replacements, and Steven Spielberg offered to step in, himself, "for a hefty fee," Hancock was replaced by French director Jeannot Szwarc, who was best known for his television work. Screenwriter Carl Gottlieb, who worked on the original Jaws screenplay, was brought in to re-work the script. Gottlieb cut several characters and a few roles were re-cast, including the role of "Mike Brody," according to a 1 Aug 1977 LAT article. Production resumed 1 Aug 1977 in Navarre Beach, FL with a scheduled fourteen-week shoot. By Oct 1977, filming in FL experienced more delays due to two hurricanes. The budget ballooned from a planned $10 million to an estimated $15 million according to the 9 Oct 1977 LAT article.
       As stated in a 26 May 1978 St. Louis Globe-Democrat article, the final budget tally was closer to $20 million, with a promotional budget estimated at over $5 million. Promotions included a novelization of the film released ahead of the film’s premiere. In a rare move, Bantam Books published the first chapter of the book in major newspapers across the nation – including the Los Angeles Times, Washington Post and the Chicago Tribune. The novel was written by Hank Searls, and based on the first version of the screenplay written by Howard Sackler and Dorothy Tristan. Much like the first movie, merchandise was sold in conjunction with the release including: comic books, sneakers, lunch boxes and T-shirts.
       According to a 20 Jun 1978 HR news item, Jaws 2 grossed $9,845,910 in its first three days of release, ninety-two percent of the opening weekend tally for Jaws . The film grossed $51,106,742 after five weeks according to a 25 Jul 1978 HR news item.
       John Dukakis, the nineteen-year-old son of MA governor Michael Dukakis, made his feature film acting debut in the role of “Polo," as reported in a 9 Oct 1977 LAT article.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
31 May 1976.
---
Box Office
9 May 1977.
---
Box Office
20 Jun 1977.
---
Box Office
10 Aug 1977.
---
Box Office
23 Oct 1977.
---
Box Office
25 Jul 1978.
---
Cinemadite, The
Jul 1976.
---
Daily Variety
22 Jul 1975.
---
Daily Variety
21 Oct 1975.
---
Daily Variety
22 Apr 1977.
---
Daily Variety
13 May 1977.
---
Daily Variety
19 May 1977.
---
Daily Variety
27 Jun 1977
p. 1, 12.
Daily Variety
8 Jul 1977
p. 1, 2.
Daily Variety
19 Aug 1977.
---
Daily Variety
12 Dec 1977.
---
Daily Variety
7 Apr 1978
p. 3, 42.
Daily Variety
5 Jun 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 May 1976.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 May 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jun 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jun 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jul 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jul 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 May 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jun 1978
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jun 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jun 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jul 1978.
---
Ladies Home Journal
Jul 1979.
---
Los Angeles Magazine
1 Jan 1978.
---
Los Angeles Times
23 Aug 1975.
---
Los Angeles Times
1 Aug 1977
Pt. IV.
Los Angeles Times
9 Oct 1977
Calendar, p. 27.
Los Angeles Times
16 Jun 1978
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
19 Jun 1978.
---
New York Times
16 May 1977.
---
New York Times
16 Jun 1978
p. 10.
People
18 Jul 1977.
---
Publishers Weekly
9 Jan 1978.
---
Publishers Weekly
20 Mar 1978.
---
St. Louis Globe-Democrat
26 May 1978
p. 7B.
Time
27 Jun 1977.
---
Variety
18 May 1977.
---
Variety
3 Aug 1977.
---
Variety
7 Dec 1977.
---
Variety
15 Mar 1978
p. 3, 50.
Variety
7 Jun 1978
p. 25.
Variety
20 Jun 1978.
---
WSJ
10 Sep 1975.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Richard D. Zanuck / David Brown Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
2d unit asst dir
Prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d unit cam
2d unit cam
Live shark photog by
Live shark photog by
Underwater cam
Gaffer
Key grip
Cam op
Cam asst
2d cam asst
2d cam asst
2d cam asst
Key grip
2d key grip
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Best boy
Still man
Still man
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Const coord
2d propman
2d propman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ladies ward
Men`s ward
Men`s ward
MUSIC
Mus scoring mixer
SOUND
Sd re-rec
Sd eff ed
Boom man
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec mechanical eff by
Spec mechanical eff by
Title & opt eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Makeup
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Loc casting
Loc casting
Tech adv
Marine coord
Scr supv
2d unit scr supv
Prod asst
Unit pub
40-man
Loc auditor
Timekeeper
Driver capt
Driver co-capt
First aid
First aid
Projectionist
Prod secy
STAND INS
Stunt coord
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based upon characters created by Peter Benchley.
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Title:
Jaws II
Release Date:
16 June 1978
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 16 June 1978
Production Date:
early--late June 1977
1 August--early November 1977 in Marchtha's Vineyard, MA, and Pensacola, FL
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios, Inc.
Copyright Date:
8 September 1978
Copyright Number:
PA13491
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Color by Technicolor®
Widescreen/ratio
Filmed in Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
116
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28688
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Two divers photograph the shipwrecked Orca underwater. A shark attacks, and the camera takes a photo as it drops to the sea floor. Police Chief Martin Brody rushes across town to attend the Amity Scholarship Fund benefit. Amity’s Mayor, Larry Vaughan, speaks at the ceremony. He introduces local developer, Len Peterson, who has donated $1500 to the scholarship fund. Chief Brody’s wife, Ellen, works for Len Peterson. Later in the evening, the shark shows up off of the coast of Amity. The next day, a local boater tells Chief Brody about an abandoned cruiser nearby, and Brody sends his deputy, Jeff Hendricks, to check it out. Local teenagers, including Brody’s son, Mike, go sailing. Back at the police station, Hendricks shows Brody the camera he found near the abandoned cruiser. They both think it strange that such an expensive boat was abandoned. As the teens have fun on the water, the shark swims below the surface. Further away, a teenage girl, Terry, jet skis as her mother drives their speedboat. When Terry gets pulled down by the shark, her mother turns the boat around to check on her. The shark jumps out of the water and takes a huge bite out of the boat. The mother shoots it with a flare gun and burns the shark’s face driving it away. Unfortunately, the boat also catches fire and ... +


Two divers photograph the shipwrecked Orca underwater. A shark attacks, and the camera takes a photo as it drops to the sea floor. Police Chief Martin Brody rushes across town to attend the Amity Scholarship Fund benefit. Amity’s Mayor, Larry Vaughan, speaks at the ceremony. He introduces local developer, Len Peterson, who has donated $1500 to the scholarship fund. Chief Brody’s wife, Ellen, works for Len Peterson. Later in the evening, the shark shows up off of the coast of Amity. The next day, a local boater tells Chief Brody about an abandoned cruiser nearby, and Brody sends his deputy, Jeff Hendricks, to check it out. Local teenagers, including Brody’s son, Mike, go sailing. Back at the police station, Hendricks shows Brody the camera he found near the abandoned cruiser. They both think it strange that such an expensive boat was abandoned. As the teens have fun on the water, the shark swims below the surface. Further away, a teenage girl, Terry, jet skis as her mother drives their speedboat. When Terry gets pulled down by the shark, her mother turns the boat around to check on her. The shark jumps out of the water and takes a huge bite out of the boat. The mother shoots it with a flare gun and burns the shark’s face driving it away. Unfortunately, the boat also catches fire and explodes. Local teenagers Tina Wilcox and Eddie see the explosion from shore. Hendricks checks the wreckage but can’t find any bodies. When Brody questions the witnesses, they all swear one moment everything was fine then suddenly the skiers disappeared. Dragging the waters for the bodies, Hendricks accidently dredges up a power line. At home, Brody tells his son, Mike, to get a job and warns him to be careful while sailing with his friends. The next day, Tina and Eddie find a beached killer whale with a chunk bitten out of its body. Brody, Hendricks and marine expert, Dr. Elkins, examine the whole carcass. Brody suspects a great white shark attacked the whale, and tells Mayor Vaughan they may have another shark problem. While driving along the beach, Brody spots a piece of debris in the ocean. He wades out to retrieve it and discovers the burned remains of the speedboat driver. At the station, Brody puts cyanide in hollowed-out bullets and places them in his revolver. Back at home, he informs Mike he will be working the rest of the summer and is forbidden from sailing. The next day at the beach, Brody stands watch in the shark tower, while Mayor Vaughan, Peterson, and Ellen show potential real estate customers around the beach. Brody thinks he spots a shark and sounds the alarm, but after he rushes down to the water and shoots his gun at the predator, he realizes it is only a school of blue fish. The locals are traumatized, and Vaughan, Peterson, and Ellen are furious that Brody caused an unnecessary scene. That evening, Brody gets a call from Phil Fogarty, who has developed a roll of film from the camera Hendricks found, including a picture of the shark's eye. Believing he has the proof he needs to convince Vaughan, Brody rushes to town hall and shows Vaughan, Peterson and a few others the pictures. However, they don’t see what he sees, and Brody loses his temper trying to convince them. At a local restaurant, a pretty teenager named Jackie convinces Mike to go sailing to the lighthouse the next day, despite his father's orders. That night, Brody comes home drunk, and his wife realizes he’s just been fired, and Deputy Hendricks has been promoted to Chief. Early the next morning, Mike sneaks out to go sailing with his friends, but he is forced to bring his younger brother, Sean, so he won’t tell their parents. The teenagers sail off in several boats together. Mike, Andy and Jackie sail by a local diving instructor, Tom Andrews, and his class. The class does a lobster dive, but during the dive, Tom encounters the shark and returns to the surface too quickly. He suffers an embolism and is taken back to shore for medical attention. The shark makes its way toward the teenagers. On the water, Tina and Eddie are separated from the group. As they kiss on their boat, the shark swims into the boat, knocks Eddie into the water, and eats him. While driving into town, Brody and Ellen see an ambulance speeding toward the docks. Brody follows and talks to Hendricks and some of the diving students. A student claims Tom was scared by something in the water and panicked. Hendricks tells Brody and Ellen that he saw Mike sail out with the other teenagers. Alarmed, Brody and Ellen commandeer Hendricks's boat to find their son. Brody calls the Harbor Patrol and asks them to search for the teenagers. Brody, Ellen and Hendricks find Tina’s boat. When they ask her what happened, she sputters, “Shark!” Brody calls a passing boat and tells Ellen and Hendricks to take Tina back to shore. On his own, Brody takes the boat to find the teenagers. The shark attacks and Mike is knocked unconscious and thrown into the water. The teens panic and crash their boats into each other, but manage to pull Mike out of the water before the shark eats him. Two of the teenagers take the injured Mike back to shore. The ones left behind tie their boats together and attempt to drift to a body of land called Cable Junction. The Harbor Patrol reaches the teenagers, but as the helicopter pilot attempts to tow the teenagers, the shark jumps out of the water and pulls the helicopter underwater, killing the pilot. As Sean and Marge fall into the water, Marge saves Sean but gets swallowed by the shark. Jackie and Sean go into shock. The other teens have to coax Sean back to their boat. Hours go by and they see Cable Junction in the distance. Still searching for the teenagers, Brody spots Mike and his friends on their sail boat. Mike tells Brody where they were headed and that Sean is with them. Brody rushes to find them, but just as Brody reaches the teenagers the shark attacks Brody’s boat. He crashes the boat into the rocks while trying to escape, but manages to throw his hook line to the teenagers’ boat in order to pull them to shore. However, the hook gets caught on a power line and pulls it to the surface. The shark attacks the teenagers’ boat again, and they all fall into the water and scramble to swim to shore. Too scared to move, Jackie and Sean watch as the shark circles their boat. Brody gets the shark’s attention by beating the power line with an oar. The shark makes its way toward Brody, bites the power line, and gets electrocuted to death, sinking to the bottom of the ocean. Brody paddles out to Jack and Sean and takes them to shore, as the survivors reunite. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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