Rollover (1981)

R | 112 mins | Drama, Romance | 11 December 1981

Director:

Alan J. Pakula

Producer:

Bruce Gilbert

Cinematographer:

Giuseppe Rotunno

Editor:

Evan Lottman

Production Designer:

George Jenkins

Production Company:

IPC Films
Full page view
HISTORY

       On 7 Jan 1980, HR announced that Jane Fonda and Bruce Gilbert’s IPC Films had confirmed a distribution deal with Orion Pictures for Rollover, with principal photography scheduled to begin May 1980. According to HR, Gilbert and Fonda came up with the film’s story, and David Shaber’s screenplay was already complete; however, the story is credited to Shaber, Howard Kohn, and David Weir onscreen. “Preliminary production costs” were approximated at $12 million, but neither a director nor a male lead actor had been confirmed at that time.
       Six months later, a 25 Jun 1980 DV article stated that the production start date had been delayed until Oct 1980. By that time, Alan J. Pakula had been hired as director, and a “major male costar” for Fonda was expected to be announced soon. DV noted that Fonda won her first Academy Award in the 1971 Pakula film Klute (see entry), and the two filmmakers later reunited for Comes a Horseman (1978, see entry).
       On 11 Sep 1980, DV reported that the filming would not begin Oct 1980, after all, as a male lead actor had not yet been established. At that time, the filmmakers were courting Paul Newman, but he had not confirmed his decision. A 25 Nov 1980 DV news item announced that Kris Kristofferson had been cast with the role of “Hub Smith,” and the 5 Dec 1980 DV listed a 5 Jan 1981 principal photography start date in New York City. As stated in a ... More Less

       On 7 Jan 1980, HR announced that Jane Fonda and Bruce Gilbert’s IPC Films had confirmed a distribution deal with Orion Pictures for Rollover, with principal photography scheduled to begin May 1980. According to HR, Gilbert and Fonda came up with the film’s story, and David Shaber’s screenplay was already complete; however, the story is credited to Shaber, Howard Kohn, and David Weir onscreen. “Preliminary production costs” were approximated at $12 million, but neither a director nor a male lead actor had been confirmed at that time.
       Six months later, a 25 Jun 1980 DV article stated that the production start date had been delayed until Oct 1980. By that time, Alan J. Pakula had been hired as director, and a “major male costar” for Fonda was expected to be announced soon. DV noted that Fonda won her first Academy Award in the 1971 Pakula film Klute (see entry), and the two filmmakers later reunited for Comes a Horseman (1978, see entry).
       On 11 Sep 1980, DV reported that the filming would not begin Oct 1980, after all, as a male lead actor had not yet been established. At that time, the filmmakers were courting Paul Newman, but he had not confirmed his decision. A 25 Nov 1980 DV news item announced that Kris Kristofferson had been cast with the role of “Hub Smith,” and the 5 Dec 1980 DV listed a 5 Jan 1981 principal photography start date in New York City. As stated in a 27 Jan 1981 HR article, as well as in HR production charts, filming began a week behind schedule, on 12 Jan 1981. Photography was planned to continue in New York City through early Apr 1981, largely on location, but also at Astoria Studios in Queens, which was reserved for Feb and Mar 1981. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, New York City locations included the Vivian Beaumont Theater at Lincoln Center, and a mid-town apartment that was furnished with original paintings by artists including Helen Frankenthaler, Jackson Pollock, and Andy Warhol. The film’s Saudi Arabian negotiation scenes were filmed in Morocco, as well as at the Empire State Plaza and the State University campus, both in Albany, NY. A 4 Mar 1981 Var news item reported the budget at approximately $16 million.
       Rollover remained on Var production charts through 6 May 1981, and a 22 Jul 1981 Var news item announced that Orion had scheduled the film for an 11 Dec 1981 release date at nearly 800 theaters. Despite Orion’s efforts to back the film as a blockbuster, it was generally not well received by critics, and poor box-office receipts ensued. According to the 23 Feb 1982 Village Voice, the picture grossed $6 million during its release.

      End credits include: “Special thanks to George Page,” and, “Video documentary footage furnished by Downtown Community Television Center.” In addition: “The producers wish to thank: Leona Johnpoll and the New York State Office of Motion Picture and Television Development; The New York City Mayor’s Office for Motion Pictures & Television, and the Tactical Police Unit; The Museum of Natural History; The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey; The New York State Urban Development Corporation; State University of New York at Albany; The Vivian Beaumont Theatre, Lincoln Center;The Rainbow Room; The New York Bureau of Cable News Network; Peter Duchin and His Orchestra; New York Telephone for Communications Equipment; 'Lincoln Center Benefit Party' by Celebrations Catering; Table settings by William Adams, Inc. and Royal Doulton, Ltd., and furs by Mr. Jerry Sorbara.” Credits also state that the picture was “filmed at Astoria Motion Picture and Television Center, Astoria, New York.” The film lists the names of over thirty artists, and the titles the artwork used in the film, which was on loan from the following sources: Kennedy Galleries, Inc., the collection of Jack Lenor Larsen, Ingeborg Ten Haeff, Smith Galleries, Ltd., Gallery Terry Dintenfass, Inc., Andre Emmerich Gallery, George Meade’s N.Y., Gallery Xavier Fourcade, Inc., Gruenebaum Gallery, Leo Castelli Gallery, “Chairman’s photographs” by Bachrach, Susan Levinson Gallery, Robert Elkon Galleries, Inc., and David Findlay Galleries, Inc. According to end credits, the picture was “filmed with a Louma Crane by Samcine.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
25 Jun 1980
p. 1, 18.
Daily Variety
11 Sep 1980.
---
Daily Variety
25 Nov 1980.
---
Daily Variety
5 Dec 1980.
---
Daily Variety
8 Dec 1981.
p. 3, 6.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jan 1980
p. 1, 44.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Dec 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jan 1981
p. 1, 4.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Feb 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Dec 1981
pp. 3-4
Los Angeles Times
10 Dec 1981
p. 1.
New York Times
11 Dec 1981
p. 12.
Variety
4 Mar 1981.
---
Variety
6 May 1981.
---
Variety
22 Jul 1981.
---
Variety
9 Dec 1981
p. 18.
Village Voice
23 Feb 1982
p. 55.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An Alan J. Pakula film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr/Prod supv
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
1st asst dir/Trading room
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story
Story
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2nd asst cam
Still photog
New York dir of photog
Key grip
Louma Crane op
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst prod des
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Prop master
Set dresser
Master scenic artist
Shop craftsman
Carpenter
Const grip
COSTUMES
Cost
Asst to Ann Roth
Key cost
Women's ward supv
Dresser for Jane Fonda
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
Asst mus ed
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Asst looping ed
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles and opt by
MAKEUP
Makeup
Makeup for Jane Fonda
Hairstylist
Hairstylist for Jane Fonda
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Asst to the prod mgr
Scr supv
Prod office coord
Asst prod office coord
Prod auditor
Asst prod auditor
Loc coord
Asst to the prod
Asst to the prod
Asst to Mr. Pakula
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Teamster capt
Casting asst
Casting consultant
Extras casting
Extras casting
Economic consultant
Consultant, Saudi Arabia seq
Tech adv
Video eng
Asst to video eng
Unit pub
Television news consultant
STAND INS
Charlie Winter's voice
Kris Kristofferson's stand-in
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Roll-Over
Release Date:
11 December 1981
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 11 December 1981
Production Date:
12 January-- early May 1981 in New York City, Albany, NY, and Morocco
Copyright Claimant:
Orion Pictures Company
Copyright Date:
27 January 1982
Copyright Number:
PA128610
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Camera and lenses by Panavision ®
Duration(in mins):
112
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26516
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At Boro National Bank in New York City, executive Roy Lefcourt suddenly orders his traders to sell $100 million in shares, and, in turn, U.S. currency begins to lose value. Responding to the crisis, First New York Bank chairman Maxwell Emery bails out Boro National with $40 million. That night, at the World Trade Center, millionaire industrialist Charlie Winters is stabbed to death in his Winterchem Corp. office as he discovers illicit payment instructions to First New York Bank, account 21214, and the murderer steals the revealing documents. Meanwhile, Winters’ wife, former film actress Lee Winters, hosts a charity event at the National History Museum. There, First New York’s Maxwell Emery offers his young protégé, Hub Smith, a leading role at Boro National, but Hub is reluctant to rescue the bank. When Hub sees Lee Winters learn of her husband’s demise, he reflects upon “the illusion of safety,” and changes his mind about Maxwell’s proposal. On his first day of work at Boro National, Hub plans to stabilize business by finding a customer in need of a multi-million dollar loan. Deciding to pursue Boro National’s most lucrative client, Winterchem Corp., Hub attends a restaurant luncheon with Winterchem executives, including Lee Winters, who remains on the company’s board after her husband’s death. There, Winterchem officers announce plans to cut back company investments, but Lee insists on expansion, and proposes buying a petrochemical plant in Spain. Just then, Hub excuses himself and surreptitiously calls Lee from a restaurant telephone, reporting that her plan will never work. Lee later barges into Hub’s office to counter his assertions and, in return, Hub pays ... +


At Boro National Bank in New York City, executive Roy Lefcourt suddenly orders his traders to sell $100 million in shares, and, in turn, U.S. currency begins to lose value. Responding to the crisis, First New York Bank chairman Maxwell Emery bails out Boro National with $40 million. That night, at the World Trade Center, millionaire industrialist Charlie Winters is stabbed to death in his Winterchem Corp. office as he discovers illicit payment instructions to First New York Bank, account 21214, and the murderer steals the revealing documents. Meanwhile, Winters’ wife, former film actress Lee Winters, hosts a charity event at the National History Museum. There, First New York’s Maxwell Emery offers his young protégé, Hub Smith, a leading role at Boro National, but Hub is reluctant to rescue the bank. When Hub sees Lee Winters learn of her husband’s demise, he reflects upon “the illusion of safety,” and changes his mind about Maxwell’s proposal. On his first day of work at Boro National, Hub plans to stabilize business by finding a customer in need of a multi-million dollar loan. Deciding to pursue Boro National’s most lucrative client, Winterchem Corp., Hub attends a restaurant luncheon with Winterchem executives, including Lee Winters, who remains on the company’s board after her husband’s death. There, Winterchem officers announce plans to cut back company investments, but Lee insists on expansion, and proposes buying a petrochemical plant in Spain. Just then, Hub excuses himself and surreptitiously calls Lee from a restaurant telephone, reporting that her plan will never work. Lee later barges into Hub’s office to counter his assertions and, in return, Hub pays an unsolicited visit to Lee’s townhouse that evening. There, he admits to his mistake and compliments Lee’s business acumen. Hub predicts that Lee will replace her husband as chairman of Winterchem if her deal with the Spanish petrochemical company is a success, and offers her a loan of $500 million through a private agent. Boro will retain a 1% commission and the bank will be rescued. The next day, Lee realizes that Winterchem executives have secretly resolved to curtail her power, and refuse to purchase the petrochemical plant. Following Hub’s instructions, Lee stages a meeting with a Japanese competitor that wants to overtake Winterchem. Fearing that Lee is selling her company stock, the Winterchem executives finally agree to the deal. Lee and Hub celebrate by making love. Sometime later, in Saudi Arabia, Lee and Hub negotiate their $500 million loan with Arab investors. Lee is startled to learn that her Winterchem stock is being used as collateral, and fears losing her company, but Hub assures his lover that Boro National will back her up. As Lee reluctantly approves the deal, Hub admits that he desires her partnership above financial gain, and they kiss. Back at Boro National, Hub is perplexed by an order to “hold” $95 million in Saudi Arabian funds; customary practice permits the bank to deposit the money into a “rollover” account to earn interest. The loss of interest will cost Boro millions of dollars. Hub reports the situation to his Saudi Arabian connection, Sal Naftari, unaware that Naftari is an operative in a secret plan devised by Maxwell Emery, Hub’s mentor and the chief executive at First New York Bank. Maxwell illicitly created account 21214 to conceal his practice of skimming “slush funds” from Saudi Arabian deposits at Boro National. At a clandestine meeting with Naftari, Maxwell worries that the recent $95 million hold will expose their scheme. Naftari reminds him that Charlie Winters already discovered the secret account, but they were able to silence the industrialist by killing him. The men’s Saudi Arabian associate, Khalid, does not trust the value of U.S. currency, and is reluctant to rollover the $95 million, but Maxwell warns Khalid that he is “playing with the end of the world.” Back at Boro National, Hub orders his traders to buy, regardless of the bank’s potential demise, so the company can maintain its credibility. However, Hub’s associate, Roy Lefcourt, panics and begins to pursue a bail out from the Federal Reserve. Hub convinces Roy to wait for one night. Keeping up appearances, Hub attends a banquet hosted by Lee, who has recently been named chairman of Winterchem. Lee remains unaware of the problems at Boro National, but when she later goes to her new office, she discovers a hidden cassette tape. Listening to the recorded conversation between her deceased husband, Charlie Winters, and a federal bank examiner named Mr. Fewster, Lee learns about the secret account, although no partners are identified. Back at Boro National, Hub and his team are relieved when stock markets open abroad, and reports announce that the Saudi Arabians have decided to rollover $90 million, after all. Upon discovering the balance of $5 million will be deposited in account 21214, Hub realizes that payments to First New York have been ongoing. The next day, Lee travels to Washington, D.C., to meet Fewster, and he reluctantly admits that Boro National is threatened by account 21214. However, he was bribed to keep quiet, and fears he will meet the same fate as Charlie. Lee is surprised to learn that her husband’s murder was linked to his knowledge of the secret account. Although Fewster agrees to bring Lee the documents that were stolen from Charlie at the time of his death, he instead returns home to burn the file and commit suicide. Meanwhile, Hub searches Maxwell Emery’s office at First New York, and breaks into the secret account records. When Lee later visits Hub’s apartment, she sees a printout of the documents and secretly suspects her lover of betrayal. The next day, Hub accuses Maxwell of using him as a pawn at Boro National, keeping the bank open long enough to siphon funds from the Saudi Arabians. Maxwell admits he has been using the money to buy gold, thereby diluting the value of the U.S. dollar. However, Maxwell argues that if the scheme is exposed, the Saudi Arabians will pull their money out of the U.S. economy altogether, and the international economy will be irrevocably destabilized. Claiming that corruption is inevitable, Maxwell says he is involved in the secret operation only to make sure the Saudis remain under control. Meanwhile, Lee asks Naftari to contact the Saudis with her proposal: she will remain silent about the secret account in exchange for full possession of Winterchem. Lee wants her loan contract renegotiated, so her Winterchem shares are no longer leveraged as securities. That evening, Hub waits at Lee’s apartment as she attends an opera fundraiser. Taking a telephone message for Lee, Hub learns that his lover has contacted the Saudis about the account, and has an appointment to meet their associates the following morning. He heads to the opera to confront Lee, who announces her decision to cut ties with Boro National. When Hub guides Lee to her limousine, she pushes him away, only to discover the chauffeur is an imposter, set on killing her. Hub rescues Lee and swears he did not previously know about account 21214. Meanwhile, Maxwell learns that the Saudis have withdrawn all funds from U.S. banks. As a result, the dollar depreciates and the international stock market collapses. Millions of people around the world lose their livelihood, and anarchy ensues. Maxwell shoots himself in the head. Operations shut down at Boro National, but Hub stays behind, determined to begin anew. Lee finds him alone, and offers to be his partner. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.