Airplane II: The Sequel (1982)

PG | 85 mins | Comedy | 10 December 1982

Director:

Ken Finkleman

Writer:

Ken Finkleman

Producer:

Howard W. Koch

Cinematographer:

Joseph Biroc

Editor:

Tina Hirsch

Production Designer:

William Sandell

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures
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HISTORY

       Although an 18 Jun 1982 LAT article noted that Jim Abrahams and brothers David and Jerry Zucker, the writers and directors of the first Airplane , did not want to make a sequel, a Sep 1981 edition of Playboy stated that the men attempted to develop another picture in the series, but instead they created the television comedy series, Police Squad (ABC, 4 Mar 1991—4 Sep 1991). On 28 Aug 1981, LAT reported that Airplane II: The Sequel was being written for Paramount Pictures by writer-director Ken Finkleman.
       As noted in the 18 Jun 1982 LAT, a number of principal cast members reprised their roles for the sequel, including Robert Hays, Julie Hagerty, Lloyd Bridges, and Peter Graves as “Captain Oveur.” Although Aldo Ray was set to star as “Sgt. Maj. Gus Greavy,” neither Ray nor the character appear in the final film. While HR production charts published 6 Jul 1982 listed Ray and Susie Coelho Bono, then-wife of actor Sonny Bono, she did not remain with the project. Official screen credits from AMPAS library production files recorded the following actors: Jack Bernardi, Martin Garner, Laurie Hagen, Maurice Hill, Rance Howard, Gregory Itzin, Will Porter, Jim Staahl, and George Wendt. However, their roles are not credited onscreen and their inclusion in the final film remains undetermined.
       As stated in HR production charts, principal photography began 2 Jun 1982 in Los Angeles, CA. According to production notes from AMPAS library files and a 3 Nov 1982 DV news item, Airplane II took eight weeks to complete and ... More Less

       Although an 18 Jun 1982 LAT article noted that Jim Abrahams and brothers David and Jerry Zucker, the writers and directors of the first Airplane , did not want to make a sequel, a Sep 1981 edition of Playboy stated that the men attempted to develop another picture in the series, but instead they created the television comedy series, Police Squad (ABC, 4 Mar 1991—4 Sep 1991). On 28 Aug 1981, LAT reported that Airplane II: The Sequel was being written for Paramount Pictures by writer-director Ken Finkleman.
       As noted in the 18 Jun 1982 LAT, a number of principal cast members reprised their roles for the sequel, including Robert Hays, Julie Hagerty, Lloyd Bridges, and Peter Graves as “Captain Oveur.” Although Aldo Ray was set to star as “Sgt. Maj. Gus Greavy,” neither Ray nor the character appear in the final film. While HR production charts published 6 Jul 1982 listed Ray and Susie Coelho Bono, then-wife of actor Sonny Bono, she did not remain with the project. Official screen credits from AMPAS library production files recorded the following actors: Jack Bernardi, Martin Garner, Laurie Hagen, Maurice Hill, Rance Howard, Gregory Itzin, Will Porter, Jim Staahl, and George Wendt. However, their roles are not credited onscreen and their inclusion in the final film remains undetermined.
       As stated in HR production charts, principal photography began 2 Jun 1982 in Los Angeles, CA. According to production notes from AMPAS library files and a 3 Nov 1982 DV news item, Airplane II took eight weeks to complete and had a budget twice that of the film’s predecessor.
       After a well-attended “sneak” preview at the Cinerama Theater in San Diego, CA, on 29 Oct 1982, where several hundred Airplane! fans were turned away, Paramount approved a Jan 1983 production start date for Airplane III, according to DV. Release was scheduled for Summer 1983. However, Airplane II: The Sequel received generally lackluster reviews from critics for failing to match the charm of the original, and production on Airplane III did not move ahead.
      In a parody of Star Wars (1977, see entry), the opening credits are prefaced with a wall of text receding into space, containing the following prologue: “By the close of the twentieth century, construction of colonies on the lunar surface had begun and with this colonization came a new era in space travel. As our story opens, Mayflower 1, the first passenger shuttle to the moon, prepares for its maiden voyage—a voyage filled with hope, yet destined for disaster.” A following paragraph begins to describe an erotic encounter between a princess and a knight before the image shatters to reveal the film’s title. End credits include “Special Thanks to Al Jean and Mike Reiss,” and misspell the name of singer-songwriter Jimmy Webb as “Jimmie” Webb. End credits conclude with a note stating that the production was made in Hollywood, U.S.A., and teaser tag for Paramount Pictures’ Airplane III. However, as of Sep 2013, no such sequel has been produced.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
3 Nov 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jul 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Dec 1982
p. 3, 13.
Los Angeles Times
28 Aug 1981.
---
Los Angeles Times
18 Jun 1982.
---
Los Angeles Times
11 Dec 1982
p. 1.
New York Times
10 Dec 1982
p. 10.
Playboy
Sep 1981.
---
Variety
8 Dec 1982
p. 16.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Starring:
as
William Vaughan
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures presents
A Howard W. Koch production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
Gaffer [What's a gaffer?]
Best boy [Elec]
Worst boy
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men's cost supv
Women's cost supv
MUSIC
Orig mus
Addl mus, score adpt and cond by
Mus ed
SOUND
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Spec sd eff
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles by
Miniatures des and photog by
Spec visual eff by
Supv, Spec visual eff by
Cam, Spec visual eff by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Video tech consultant
Asst to Mr. Koch
Asst to Mr. Finkleman
Scr supv
Secy to Mel Dellar
Tech adv
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Think Music," by J. Griffin
"Mission Impossible," by Lalo Schifrin
"Theme From 'Battlestar Galactica,'" by Stu Phillips and Glen Larson
+
MUSIC
"Think Music," by J. Griffin
"Mission Impossible," by Lalo Schifrin
"Theme From 'Battlestar Galactica,'" by Stu Phillips and Glen Larson
"Themes From 'Battlestar Galactica,'" by Stu Phillips
"MacArthur Park," by Jimmy Webb.
+
SONGS
"Baby Love," words and music by Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Edward Holland, performed by The Supremes, courtesy of Motown Record Corporation
"Car Wash," words and music by Norman Whitfield, performed by Rose Royce, Courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
"'Love Boat' Theme," written by Charles Fox and Paul H. Williams, performed by Jack Jones, courtesy of Aaron Spelling Productions, Inc.
+
SONGS
"Baby Love," words and music by Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Edward Holland, performed by The Supremes, courtesy of Motown Record Corporation
"Car Wash," words and music by Norman Whitfield, performed by Rose Royce, Courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
"'Love Boat' Theme," written by Charles Fox and Paul H. Williams, performed by Jack Jones, courtesy of Aaron Spelling Productions, Inc.
"Raindrops Keep Fallin' On My Head," words by Hal David, music by Burt Bacharach, performed by 101 Strings, courtesy of Alshire International.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 December 1982
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 10 December 1982
Production Date:
2 June--late July 1982 in Los Angeles
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
31 January 1983
Copyright Number:
PA163456
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
85
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26862
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At an airport in Houston, Texas, sometime in the future, travelers pass through security on their way to board the XR-2300 Mayflower, the first commercial flight to the moon. In the terminal, the head of the space center, Bud Kruger, argues with the commissioner about the spacecraft’s still-pending government approval. While Kruger points out that the ship failed to meet safety regulations, the commissioner stresses that “the board” is under pressure to keep the launch on schedule. The Mayflower ’s computer officer, Elaine Dickinson, tells her new fiancé and Mayflower crewmember, Simon Kurtz, that she is worried about the shuttle’s poor test results. However, Simon reminds her that the reports were filed by Elaine’s former lover, Ted Striker, a test pilot who lost his credibility after suffering a mental breakdown. Meanwhile, at the Ronald Reagan Hospital for the Mentally Ill, Striker reads a newspaper headline about the imminent shuttle launch and concludes that he has been hospitalized to be kept from interfering. He is further displeased to learn that Elaine is engaged to Simon and tells Dr. Stone about how he met Elaine. Although he suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder resulting from wartime piloting, Striker crash-landed a commercial 767 airplane in 1980, on which Elaine was a flight attendant. Later that evening, Striker escapes from the hospital, determined to save Elaine and the Mayflower ... +


At an airport in Houston, Texas, sometime in the future, travelers pass through security on their way to board the XR-2300 Mayflower, the first commercial flight to the moon. In the terminal, the head of the space center, Bud Kruger, argues with the commissioner about the spacecraft’s still-pending government approval. While Kruger points out that the ship failed to meet safety regulations, the commissioner stresses that “the board” is under pressure to keep the launch on schedule. The Mayflower ’s computer officer, Elaine Dickinson, tells her new fiancé and Mayflower crewmember, Simon Kurtz, that she is worried about the shuttle’s poor test results. However, Simon reminds her that the reports were filed by Elaine’s former lover, Ted Striker, a test pilot who lost his credibility after suffering a mental breakdown. Meanwhile, at the Ronald Reagan Hospital for the Mentally Ill, Striker reads a newspaper headline about the imminent shuttle launch and concludes that he has been hospitalized to be kept from interfering. He is further displeased to learn that Elaine is engaged to Simon and tells Dr. Stone about how he met Elaine. Although he suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder resulting from wartime piloting, Striker crash-landed a commercial 767 airplane in 1980, on which Elaine was a flight attendant. Later that evening, Striker escapes from the hospital, determined to save Elaine and the Mayflower passengers. Back at the airport, a man purchases a time bomb from a gift shop and hides it in his briefcase. Striker catches up with Elaine just before she boards and declares that the shuttle must be stopped. Believing Striker is mentally ill, Elaine admits that she will always love him, but says she needs Simon for stability. Although the flight is full, Striker buys a ticket from a scalper and boards the spacecraft. As Captain Oveur, navigator Unger and first officer Dunn prepare the shuttle for takeoff, Striker tries to convince Elaine to terminate the mission. Once airborne, Striker takes his seat and describes the court case that ensued from his complaints about the lunar shuttle to his elderly seatmate. At the trial, Simon blamed Striker’s incompetence for the shuttle test crash, but Striker insisted the plane was a “flying death trap," and survivors from the 767 crash landing testified to Striker’s heroism. Back in the Mayflower cockpit, the crew discovers the spaceship’s core is overheating and Elaine realizes the computer system, R.O.K. 4000, is overriding her orders. While attempting to rewire the system and extinguish a fire, Dunn and Unger open the door and are sucked out of the airlock. Thrown off course, the ship enters an asteroid field headed toward the sun, as the passengers are outraged to learn that there is a shortage of coffee. The insurgent computer system releases gas through cockpit vents, which kills Captain Oveur and leaves Elaine to pilot the runaway vessel alone. Back at the Houston Space Station, senile Chief Controller Steve McCroskey is alerted to the danger. When Simon announces that there is no hope of changing course, Elaine goes to enlist Striker’s help, but he insists that he is not capable of taking over as pilot. After hearing the pleas of Jimmy Wilson, a young passenger, Striker punches Simon and marches into the cockpit to assist Elaine, who declares her love. Striker makes radio contact with McCroskey, who remembers Striker as the hero of the 767 landing. Striker reports that he is unable to take back control of the ship from the computer system, R.O.K., so McCroskey plans to hack the computer from mission control. Meanwhile, passenger Father O’Flanagan announces that everyone on board will die, and a riot ensues. Back at mission control, police Lieutenant Hallick informs McCroskey, Kruger, and the commissioner that there is a bomber named Joe Salucci on board the flight. Meanwhile, the ship approaches the sun. Striker learns about Salucci and takes possession of the bomb with the help of Jimmy’s dog. He then informs McCroskey of his plan to detonate the computer system and reroute to the moon at warp speed. Just before the Mayflower reaches the sun, the bomb’s explosion demolishes R.O.K. and Striker successfully regains manual control of the ship. From the Alpha Beta Lunar Base, Buck Murdock, one of Striker’s comrades from the war, attempts to talk Striker through the landing process, but the ship approaches too fast. Striker jams Elaine’s hair pin into the control panel, shorting the system and destroying the auxiliary engines. The Mayflower crashes through the Alpha Beta Base and lands on the moon’s surface, but no one is harmed. As the passengers frantically evacuate, Elaine and Striker emerge in a passionate embrace and are later married. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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