Grease 2 (1982)

PG | 114 mins | Musical comedy | 11 June 1982

Director:

Patricia Birch

Writer:

Ken Finkleman

Cinematographer:

Frank Stanley

Editor:

John F. Burnett

Production Designer:

Gene Callahan

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures
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HISTORY


       Production notes in AMPAS library files mentioned the full names of the following characters whose surnames are not included onscreen: “Paulette Rebchuck,” “Sharon Cooper,” “Rhonda Ritter,” and “Goose McKenzie.” Although credited as Johnny “Nogerelli,” studio press materials and various contemporary sources spelled the character’s surname as “Nogerilli.” Production notes listed the first name of “DiMucci” as “Lou,” while characters in the film refer to him as “Louis.”
       One week prior to the 16 Jun 1978 opening of Grease (see entry), the 2 Jun 1978 HR announced that producer Allan Carr had begun work on a sequel titled Summer School with screenwriter Bronté Woodard. The 25 Mar 1980 DV announced that Carr, along with producer Robert Stigwood, would begin production in 1981 on a script written by Robert Klane. A 30 Apr 1980 HR news item revealed the working title had been changed to Son of Grease, and was set for a summer 1981 release. Andy Gibb was cast alongside Martin Mull, Jane Curtin, and Robert Klein. Sid Caesar and Eve Arden would reprise their roles from Grease, while the film’s stars, John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John, were expected to make cameo appearances. A similar brief in the Jun 1980 issue of Los Angeles magazine suggested that the project was being developed at Universal Pictures, although Paramount Pictures had produced the first Grease film. The 30 Apr 1980 HR claimed that the sequel would encapsulate the musical trends of the 1960s, and Los Angeles reported that the story would take place ten years after the events of ... More Less


       Production notes in AMPAS library files mentioned the full names of the following characters whose surnames are not included onscreen: “Paulette Rebchuck,” “Sharon Cooper,” “Rhonda Ritter,” and “Goose McKenzie.” Although credited as Johnny “Nogerelli,” studio press materials and various contemporary sources spelled the character’s surname as “Nogerilli.” Production notes listed the first name of “DiMucci” as “Lou,” while characters in the film refer to him as “Louis.”
       One week prior to the 16 Jun 1978 opening of Grease (see entry), the 2 Jun 1978 HR announced that producer Allan Carr had begun work on a sequel titled Summer School with screenwriter Bronté Woodard. The 25 Mar 1980 DV announced that Carr, along with producer Robert Stigwood, would begin production in 1981 on a script written by Robert Klane. A 30 Apr 1980 HR news item revealed the working title had been changed to Son of Grease, and was set for a summer 1981 release. Andy Gibb was cast alongside Martin Mull, Jane Curtin, and Robert Klein. Sid Caesar and Eve Arden would reprise their roles from Grease, while the film’s stars, John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John, were expected to make cameo appearances. A similar brief in the Jun 1980 issue of Los Angeles magazine suggested that the project was being developed at Universal Pictures, although Paramount Pictures had produced the first Grease film. The 30 Apr 1980 HR claimed that the sequel would encapsulate the musical trends of the 1960s, and Los Angeles reported that the story would take place ten years after the events of the 1978 film. According to a 29 Jun 1980 LAT news brief, Mike Chapman would oversee the music on the film, although he does not receive onscreen credit. The Jul 1980 edition of Teen Mag suggested that, contrary to earlier reports, Travolta and Newton-John had not yet been confirmed, and a 25 Aug 1980 HR article stated they would not appear. At this time, Paramount ceased development on the sequel, then titled Greasier, with “no definite plans” to continue forward. Despite a scheduled Jun 1981 opening, the studio reportedly questioned the success of a second film in the wake of Grease’s high box office gross.
       However, early the following year, a 20 Jan 1981 HR brief suggested that Paramount had resumed preparations on the picture, claiming that Robin Johnson, a sixteen-year-old actress represented by the Robert Stigwood Organization, was in consideration for the female lead alongside Andy Gibb. On 2 Aug 1981, DV reported that principal photography would begin under the working title Grease II, on 2 Nov 1981, in anticipation for an 18 Jun 1982 release in 1,000 theaters. The 26 Aug 1981 HR stated that Rex Smith had assumed the lead role, but 18 Sep 1981 and 2 Oct 1981 DV news items noted that Timothy Hutton and Rick Springfield, respectively, were considered for the part. The Jun 1982 edition of Life magazine also included Shaun Cassidy among the contenders, while the 18 Sep 1981 DV stated that Kristy McNichol had been asked to co-star as “Stephanie Zinone.” On 9 Oct 1981, HR confirmed earlier reports that Maxwell Caulfield would make his motion picture debut as “Michael Carrington,” alongside Michelle Pfeiffer, who had been selected among strong competition. Caulfield ended his performance in a London, England, stage production of Entertaining Mr. Sloane in order to begin filming the picture, which had been renamed Grease 2. The 28 Oct 1981 Var reported that Annette Funicello was originally cast to play “Miss Mason,” while Alice Ghostley would reprise her Grease role as “Mrs. Murdock.” A 13 Nov 1981 HR brief claimed that Tom Poston had also joined the production. However, Funicello, Ghostley, and Poston do not appear in the film. Production notes indicated that, in addition to Caulfield, Lorna Luft, Peter Frechette, Leif Green, and identical twins Liz and Jean Sagal made their motion picture debuts in Grease 2. The Sagal sisters reportedly auditioned separately in New York City and Los Angeles, CA, and were both cast coincidentally. Didi Conn reprised her role as “Frenchy,” while Alison Price, who production notes claimed had been featured in an unidentified role in Grease, was cast as Rhonda Ritter.
       A 4 Nov 1981 LAT article stated that two years earlier, Paramount Chairman Barry Diller approached Patricia Birch as his only choice to choreograph and direct the proposed $11 million sequel to Grease. Although Birch was an active contributor to both the stage and film productions of Grease and was credited as its choreographer, she was reportedly hesitatant about directing; however, she was encouraged to take the job by Saturday Night Live (NBC, 1975— ) producer Lorne Michaels. Birch’s preparations included eighteen months of script rewrites, eight weeks of pre-production, and classes with drama coach David Craig. In addition, the article included Del Shannon and Michael O’Donoghue among the film’s composers, although they are not credited onscreen and their participation remains undetermined. When conducting screen tests, Birch asked the actors to perform a short monologue, complete with character transitions, against a backlit set.
       The 3 Apr 1982 issue of Billboard magazine suggested that the revised story placed the action in 1963, and would contain only songs written solely for the movie, whereas Grease contained both original compositions and songs from the 1971 Broadway musical.
       According to the 9 Nov 1981 HR, principal photography began that day. The 20 Dec 1981 LAT reported a $13.2 million budget. A 28 May 1982 HR article stated that although producers planned to return to Venice High School in Venice, CA, the original “Rydell High” location used for Grease, the production summer 1982 release date meant that principal photography needed to be completed during the months when classes were still in session. Alternatively, filming took place at Excelsior High School in Norwalk, CA, which had closed down in Jun 1981 due to low enrollment; Paramount transformed the property into a free-standing studio facility, complete with commissary, rehearsal, editing, and screening rooms, and a sound stage.
       The 3 Mar 1982 DV indicated that arrangements were being made for the stars of Grease 2 to participate in a publicity tour beginning mid to late-Apr 1982, which would accompany the film’s radio and merchandise tie-ins. The 16 May 1982 LAT announced that the Los Angeles Children’s Museum would host the 1960s-themed world premiere and benefit party at the Pacific Cinerama Dome and the Bowling Club on 3 Jun 1982. On 12 May 1982, HR stated that the picture was scheduled to open domestically 11 Jun 1982, in 1,250 theaters.
       Despite a 9 Feb 1982 DV report that Allan Carr had announced plans for Grease 3 immediately following principal photography on Grease 2, production did not move forward due to the film’s largely poor critical reception and domestic box office returns. The 11 Jul 1982 LAHExam stated that Carr hoped to make cable and network television deals in order to recoup some of the picture’s negative costs.
      End credits include the statement: “Suggested by characters created by Jim Jacobs & Warren Casey in ‘Grease,’” and give thanks to the Norwalk La Mirada Unified School District and the members of the U.S.C. Trojan Marching Band. A separate statement notes that the picture was made in Hollywood, U.S.A.

              During the film’s running track scene, the marching band plays “Moon River” and “When the Saints Go Marching In,” while the Rydell High “Preptones” group sings “Mr. Sandman” during their audition for the school talent show. The songs are not listed in the end credits. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Billboard
3 Apr 1982
p. 4, 67.
Daily Variety
25 Mar 1980.
---
Daily Variety
2 Aug 1981.
---
Daily Variety
18 Sep 1981.
---
Daily Variety
2 Oct 1981.
---
Daily Variety
11 Dec 1981.
---
Daily Variety
9 Feb 1982.
---
Daily Variety
3 Mar 1982
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jun 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Apr 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Aug 1980
p. 1, 6.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jan 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Aug 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Oct 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 May 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 May 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jun 1982
p. 3, 10.
LAHExam
11 Jul 1982.
---
Life
Jun 1982
pp. 81-86.
Los Angeles
Jun 1980.
---
Los Angeles Times
29 Jun 1980.
---
Los Angeles Times
20 Dec 1981
p. 49.
Los Angeles Times
4 Nov 1981
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
16 May 1982
Section IV, p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
10 Jun 1982
p. 1.
New York Times
11 Jun 1982
p. 10.
Teen Mag
Jul 1980.
---
Variety
28 Oct 1981.
---
Variety
9 Jun 1982
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures Presents
A Robert Stigwood/Allan Carr Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Key grip
Gaffer
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Gaffer
Paramount best boy
Rigging gaffer
Elec
Best boy grip
Paramount best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Const coord
Set des
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Leadman
Leadman
Const foreman
Prop shop
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men's cost supv
Men`s cost
Ladies cost supv
Ladies cost
Women's costumer
Men's costumer
MUSIC
Mus prod and arr by
Mus ed
Mus rec at
Burbank
Mus rec by, Evergreen Studios
Mus rec by, Evergreen Studios
Guitars
Bass
Mus post-scoring and addl orch by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Dial ed
Dolby Stereo consultant
Dolby Stereo consultant
Playback op
VISUAL EFFECTS
Title des
DANCE
Choreog
Asst choreog
Asst choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Makeup artist
Hairstyle supv
Hairstylist
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Loc mgr
Transportation coord
Asst to Patricia Birch
Asst to Bill Oakes
Asst to Neil A. Machlis
Secy to Neil A. Machlis
Asst to Allan Carr
Asst to Robert Stigwood
Casting, Los Angeles
Casting, New York
Unit pub
Extra casting
Prod accountant
Asst casting dir
Asst casting dir
Transportation cocaptain
Transportation cocaptain
Sunrise Caterers
Caterer
Craft service
Asst prod accountant
Welfare worker/teacher
Receptionist
DGA intern
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Michael's stunt double
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Suggested by characters created by Jim Jacobs and Warren Casey.
SONGS
"Back To School Again," music by Louis St. Louis, lyrics by Howard Greenfield, vocal by The Four Tops, horn arrangements by Andy Muson
"Who's That Guy?," music by Louis St. Louis, lyrics by Howard Greenfield
"(Love Will) Turn Back The Hands Of Time," music by Louis St. Louis, lyrics by Howard Greenfield, orchestra arranged and conducted by Artie Butler
+
SONGS
"Back To School Again," music by Louis St. Louis, lyrics by Howard Greenfield, vocal by The Four Tops, horn arrangements by Andy Muson
"Who's That Guy?," music by Louis St. Louis, lyrics by Howard Greenfield
"(Love Will) Turn Back The Hands Of Time," music by Louis St. Louis, lyrics by Howard Greenfield, orchestra arranged and conducted by Artie Butler
"Charades," music by Louis St. Louis, lyrics by Michael Gibson, orchestra arranged and conducted by Artie Butler
"Score Tonight," music and lyrics by Dominic Bugatti, Frank Musker, and Louis St. Louis, horn arrangements by Andy Muson
"Girl For All Seasons," music and lyrics by Dominic Bugatti and Frank Musker, horn arrangements by Andy Muson
"Rock-A-Hula Luau (Summer Is Coming)," music and lyrics by Dominic Bugatti and Frank Musker
"Prowlin'," music by Dominic Bugatti and Frank Musker, lyrics by Dominic Bugatti, Frank Musker, and Christopher Cerf, horn arrangements by Andy Muson
"Brad," music and lyrics by Christopher Cerf
"Reproduction," music and lyrics by Dennis Linde
"Cool Rider," music and lyrics by Dennis Linde
"Do It For Our Country," music and lyrics by Rob Hegel
"We'll Be Together," music and lyrics by Bob Morrison and Johnny MacRae
"Our Day Will Come," by Bob Hilliard and Mort Garson, performed by Ruby and the Romantics, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
"Rebel Walk," by Duane Eddy and Lee Hazelwood, performed by Duane Eddy, courtesy of Jamie Record Co.
"Cry," performed by Tom Villard.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Summer School
Son of Grease
Greasier
Grease II
Release Date:
11 June 1982
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 3 June 1982
Los Angeles and New York openings: 11 June 1982
Production Date:
9 November 1981--February 1982 in Norwalk, CA
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
21 July 1982
Copyright Number:
PA145005
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo® in selected theaters
Color
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
114
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1961, Rydell High School principal Miss McGee and her secretary, Blanche, raise the American flag, preparing for the start of a new academic year. The students arrive, including Michael Carrington, the straight-laced, British cousin of Rydell High graduate, Sandy Olsson, and the all-girl “greaser” gang, the Pink Ladies, led by Stephanie Zinone. Beauty school dropout, Frenchy, tells Michael of her plans to finish high school and sell her own cosmetics line. In the hallway, Stephanie reminds her former boyfriend, Johnny Nogerelli, leader of the T-Birds motorcycle gang, that their relationship is over. When Michael attempts to choose a nearby locker, the T-Birds harass him, but Stephanie assures the newcomer not to let their teasing worry him. As students attend class, Miss McGee makes the morning intercom announcement, encouraging students to join extracurricular activities, and welcoming Michael as a new student. After school, two sorority girls convince Michael to play piano for the talent show auditions. When Michael notices Stephanie at the running track, Frenchy warns him that the girl is “off-limits” to anyone who is not a member of the T-Birds. A rival greaser gang called the Cycle Lords ride their motorcycles onto the track and challenge the T-Birds to a bowling game that night. Later, at the bowling alley, the Pink Ladies bowl against the T-Birds, and Johnny kisses Stephanie’s friend, Paulette Rebchuck. Angry, Stephanie asserts that she will kiss the next boy who walks inside the building. At that moment, Michael enters, rehearsing how he will introduce himself to the T-Birds, and Stephanie kisses him. As the bowlers leave, Michael befriends Paulette’s younger sister, Dolores, and walks her home as she explains her aspirations to ... +


In 1961, Rydell High School principal Miss McGee and her secretary, Blanche, raise the American flag, preparing for the start of a new academic year. The students arrive, including Michael Carrington, the straight-laced, British cousin of Rydell High graduate, Sandy Olsson, and the all-girl “greaser” gang, the Pink Ladies, led by Stephanie Zinone. Beauty school dropout, Frenchy, tells Michael of her plans to finish high school and sell her own cosmetics line. In the hallway, Stephanie reminds her former boyfriend, Johnny Nogerelli, leader of the T-Birds motorcycle gang, that their relationship is over. When Michael attempts to choose a nearby locker, the T-Birds harass him, but Stephanie assures the newcomer not to let their teasing worry him. As students attend class, Miss McGee makes the morning intercom announcement, encouraging students to join extracurricular activities, and welcoming Michael as a new student. After school, two sorority girls convince Michael to play piano for the talent show auditions. When Michael notices Stephanie at the running track, Frenchy warns him that the girl is “off-limits” to anyone who is not a member of the T-Birds. A rival greaser gang called the Cycle Lords ride their motorcycles onto the track and challenge the T-Birds to a bowling game that night. Later, at the bowling alley, the Pink Ladies bowl against the T-Birds, and Johnny kisses Stephanie’s friend, Paulette Rebchuck. Angry, Stephanie asserts that she will kiss the next boy who walks inside the building. At that moment, Michael enters, rehearsing how he will introduce himself to the T-Birds, and Stephanie kisses him. As the bowlers leave, Michael befriends Paulette’s younger sister, Dolores, and walks her home as she explains her aspirations to become a Pink Lady. One of the teachers, Miss Yvette Mason, escorts a new substitute teacher named Mr. Stuart to his classroom. Upon his arrival, however, the students leave, and Miss McGee warns Johnny about riding his motorcycle on school grounds. After Michael plays piano for the Pink Ladies’ talent show audition, he repeatedly asks Stephanie out on a date, but she turns him down. When he asks why she kissed him, she dismisses it as a joke and insists that she will only date a “cool rider” with a motorcycle. Michael agrees to write school essays for the T-Birds in exchange for money, which he plans to use to buy a motorcycle. Once he purchases the motorcycle, he practices riding in the park until he is able to perform tricks without falling. Meanwhile, the T-Birds’ singing act is accepted into the talent show, but the boys worry that they cannot harmonize. Outside the bowling alley one evening, the Cycle Lords fight the T-Birds, but Michael breaks up the brawl by riding his bike through the parking lot. Hidden beneath his helmet and leathers, the teenagers are unable to determine his identity and call him the “Cool Rider.” Stephanie tells her friends that she does not want to be defined as someone’s girl friend, and the Cool Rider motors away. The next day in chemistry class, Michael is surprised that Stephanie does not recognize him from the night before. Following a school-wide nuclear bomb drill, T-Bird Louis DiMucci convinces Pink Lady Sharon Cooper that an attack is imminent, leading her to an underground shelter. His friends sound an alarm outside, while inside, DiMucci attempts to convince Sharon to let him take her virginity. Although Sharon is initially receptive, she realizes the ruse, and runs away. One afternoon, Michael dresses as the Cool Rider and disguises his voice in order to visit Stephanie at her job as a car mechanic. They ride to a hilltop, where they kiss in the sunset. After dark, Michael attempts to reveal his identity, but is interrupted by the T-Birds’ arrival, and promises to see Stephanie again at the upcoming talent show. Johnny threatens Stephanie if she continues to see the mysterious biker, causing Paulette to become angered by Johnny’s jealousy. When Stephanie fails an English essay, Michael helps her revise it, and they end up discussing the mysterious Cool Rider. Stephanie says she is impressed by Michael’s intelligence, but explains that she is bound by the “Pink Lady code” that prevents her from dating him. The night of the talent show, the T-Birds chase the Cool Rider away from the school, prompting Stephanie and the Pink Ladies to follow. When the biker rides his bike over a lethal cliff, the teenagers assume he is dead. During the talent show, Paulette yells at Johnny for dating her while he still has feelings for Stephanie. As the Pink Ladies perform their act, Stephanie becomes saddened by the Cool Rider’s alleged death, imagining herself with him atop a silver motorcycle in heaven. At the end of the school year, the students attend a luau-themed celebration on the football field. The Cycle Lords ride through the party, destroying the decorations. However, the Cool Rider arrives to chase them away, jumping his bike over the swimming pool before taking off his helmet and revealing himself as Michael. When Johnny accepts Michael into the T-Birds, Michael and Stephanie kiss. The remaining T-Birds and Pink Ladies couple, and the classmates graduate from high school. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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