Night Shift (1982)

R | 105 mins | Comedy | 30 July 1982

Director:

Ron Howard

Producer:

Brian Grazer

Cinematographer:

James Crabe

Production Designer:

Jack T. Collis

Production Company:

The Ladd Company
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HISTORY

       Promotional materials in AMPAS library files listed the full name of “Chuck Lumley” as “Charles Lumley III.”
       Director Ron Howard appears onscreen in two uncredited cameos: first as a saxophone player on the subway, and again as a man kissing a girl outside Chuck’s apartment. The character of “Mr. Pelekoudas” is not included in the onscreen credits. A casting call published in the 23 Nov 1981 DV indicated that the original name for “Mrs. Rose Koogle” was “Vivian Koogle.”
       According to a 23 Apr 1982 DV article, producer Brian Grazer conceived the story after finding a NYT news story about a prostitution ring run from a city morgue. Grazer was exclusively contracted to Paramount Pictures, but the studio passed on the project. The Sep 1982 edition of Prevue magazine claimed that Grazer approached Howard in summer 1980 after the pair had become acquainted on the Paramount Pictures studio lot and began searching for a project together. They hired television's Happy Days (ABC, 15 Jan 1974—12 Jul 1984) writers Lowell Ganz and Babaloo Mandel to draft the screenplay, which the 23 Apr 1982 DV stated was approved for a $6.4 million budget within a few days by The Ladd Company’s Alan Ladd.
       Howard reportedly approached his friend and former Happy Days co-star Henry Wrinkler with the script during Winkler’s lunch hour on the Paramount Pictures lot. Although Howard gave him the choice of either of the film’s two lead roles, Winkler chose the part of “Chuck Lumley.” According to Prevue, Winkler welcomed the departure from his Happy Days ... More Less

       Promotional materials in AMPAS library files listed the full name of “Chuck Lumley” as “Charles Lumley III.”
       Director Ron Howard appears onscreen in two uncredited cameos: first as a saxophone player on the subway, and again as a man kissing a girl outside Chuck’s apartment. The character of “Mr. Pelekoudas” is not included in the onscreen credits. A casting call published in the 23 Nov 1981 DV indicated that the original name for “Mrs. Rose Koogle” was “Vivian Koogle.”
       According to a 23 Apr 1982 DV article, producer Brian Grazer conceived the story after finding a NYT news story about a prostitution ring run from a city morgue. Grazer was exclusively contracted to Paramount Pictures, but the studio passed on the project. The Sep 1982 edition of Prevue magazine claimed that Grazer approached Howard in summer 1980 after the pair had become acquainted on the Paramount Pictures studio lot and began searching for a project together. They hired television's Happy Days (ABC, 15 Jan 1974—12 Jul 1984) writers Lowell Ganz and Babaloo Mandel to draft the screenplay, which the 23 Apr 1982 DV stated was approved for a $6.4 million budget within a few days by The Ladd Company’s Alan Ladd.
       Howard reportedly approached his friend and former Happy Days co-star Henry Wrinkler with the script during Winkler’s lunch hour on the Paramount Pictures lot. Although Howard gave him the choice of either of the film’s two lead roles, Winkler chose the part of “Chuck Lumley.” According to Prevue, Winkler welcomed the departure from his Happy Days character, Arthur “The Fonz” Fonzarelli, and promotional materials claimed that he shed fifteen pounds for the film. Production notes stated that Howard tested forty of 200 possible actors for the role of “Bill Blazejowski,” eight of whom read scenes with Henry Winkler. Prevue stated that potential co-stars auditioned during the week, with semi-finalists returning on Saturdays—Winkler’s day off from Happy Days —to screen test.
       Howard and Grazer discovered Shelley Long in Caveman (1981, see entry), but the actress was in Calexico, CA, filming Tijuana, which was later re-titled Losin’ It (1983, see entry). During a two-day furlough to Hollywood, CA, Long read for “Belinda Keaton” and was asked to return the next day to meet with Winkler. Although initially hesitant about portraying a prostitute, Long conducted independent research and accepted the role.
       On 24 Nov 1981, DV reported that Ron Howard’s Major H Productions was currently in pre-production. According to the 18 Nov 1981 DV, Winkler was scheduled to begin principal photography in New York City during his holiday hiatus from Happy Days, and would resume the following year, following production of the current Happy Days season. The 25 Jan 1982 DV stated that Winkler worked a total of nine days on location in New York City before filming picked up again that day in CA. Winkler worked Mondays through Wednesdays while concurrently shooting his television series Thursdays and Fridays. According to Prevue, the morgue was built on a specially constructed interior set in Hollywood, CA.
       The 23 Apr 1982 DV reported that principal photography had concluded its fifty-day production schedule after reshooting two scenes from the end of the script, which had been originally filmed Dec 1981 in NY. Prevue also mentioned that three days of production were devoted to filming an orgy scene that does not appear in the final film. The 4 Aug 1982 Var reported a final production cost of $8,125,000.
       The film received largely positive reviews, and Henry Winkler was nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical.
       Night Shift marked Grazer’s motion picture debut as producer, and was his first collaboration with Howard; the film was also Howard’s first time directing a studio picture. The film marked the motion picture debut of television actress Gina Hecht, and, despite Shannen Doherty’s voice role in the Jul 1982 picture, The Secret of NIMH, Night Shift was her first onscreen performance.
      Stunt coordinator Gary Combs is credited twice onscreen, once in general end credits and once under "Stunts" for the Los Angeles, CA, unit.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
18 Nov 1981.
---
Daily Variety
23 Nov 1981.
---
Daily Variety
24 Nov 1981.
---
Daily Variety
25 Jan 1982.
---
Daily Variety
26 Feb 1982.
---
Daily Variety
23 Apr 1982
p. 17.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jul 1982
p. 3, 6.
Los Angeles Times
29 Jul 1982
p. 1, 4.
New York Times
30 Jul 1982
p. 8.
Prevue
Sep 1982
pp. 18-21.
Variety
14 Jul 1982
p. 27.
Variety
4 Aug 1982.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Featuring:
Our ladies of the night
Our ladies of the night
Our ladies of the night
Our ladies of the night
Our ladies of the night
Our ladies of the night
Our ladies of the night
Our ladies of the night
Our ladies of the night
Our ladies of the night
Our ladies of the night
Our ladies of the night
Our ladies of the night
Our ladies of the night
Our ladies of the night
Our ladies of the night
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Ladd Company Release Thru Warner Bros A Warner Communications Company
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Gaffer
Key grip
Still photog
2d cam op
Asst cam
Asst cam
2nd asst cam
Best boy
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Best boy grip
Grip
Dolly grip
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Const coord
Leadman
Leadman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Propmaker
Painter foreman
Asst prop man
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Men's costumer
Women's costumer
Tailor
MUSIC
Orig mus
Orig lyrics by
Mus ed
Mus score eng
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Post prod sd by
Boom man
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles and opticals by
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Makeup man
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod coord-L.A.
Prod coord-N.Y.
Loc mgr-L.A.
Loc mgr-N.Y.
Prod auditor
Scr supv
Transportation gaffer
Prod pub
Extras casting-L.A.
Extras casting-N.Y.
Asst to the prods
Asst to Mr. Howard
Prod asst
And "Buns" by
Prod accountant
Craft service man
Casting
Atmosphere casting
First aid
Caterer
Driver cocapt
Driver
Driver
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt coord, Stunts-L.A.
Stunt driver, Stunts-L.A.
Stuntman, Stunts-L.A.
Stuntman, Stunts-L.A.
Stunt double, Stunts-L.A.
Stunt double, Stunts-L.A.
Stuntwoman, Stunts-L.A.
Stunt driver, Stunts-L.A.
Stunt coord, Stunts-N.Y.
Helicopter pilot, Stunts-N.Y.
Stunt driver, Stunts-N.Y.
Stunt driver, Stunts-N.Y.
Stunt driver, Stunts-N.Y.
Stunt driver, Stunts-N.Y.
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Night Shift," music and lyrics by Burt Bacharach, Carole Bayer Sager, Marv Ross, produced by John Boylan, performed by Quarterflash
"Girls Know How," music and lyrics by Burt Bacharach, Carole Bayer Sager, David Foster, produced by Jay Graydon and David Foster, performed by Al Jarreau
"That's What Friends Are For," music and lyrics by Burt Bacharach and Carole Bayer Sager, produced by Rod Stewart, performed by Rod Stewart
+
SONGS
"Night Shift," music and lyrics by Burt Bacharach, Carole Bayer Sager, Marv Ross, produced by John Boylan, performed by Quarterflash
"Girls Know How," music and lyrics by Burt Bacharach, Carole Bayer Sager, David Foster, produced by Jay Graydon and David Foster, performed by Al Jarreau
"That's What Friends Are For," music and lyrics by Burt Bacharach and Carole Bayer Sager, produced by Rod Stewart, performed by Rod Stewart
"They're Tearin' Down Tim Riley's Bar," performed by Kris Jensen, courtesy of The Music Umbrella
"Penthouse And Pavement," performed by Heaven 17, courtesy of Virgin Records
"Ready Or Not," performed by Riggs, courtesy of Warner Bros./Full Moon Records
"Take It Off," performed by Riggs, courtesy of Warner Bros./Full Moon Records
"You Really Got Me," performed by Van Halen, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records
"Jumping Jack Flash," performed by the Rolling Stones, courtesy of Promotone B.V.
"Someday, Someway," performed by Marshall Crenshaw, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records
"Talk Talk," performed by Talk Talk, courtesy of EMI Records, "Everlasting Love," performed by Rufus and Chaka Kahn, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records
"The Love Too Good To Last," performed by The Pointer Sisters, courtesy of Planet Records.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
30 July 1982
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 30 July 1982
Production Date:
late December 1981--late April 1982 in New York City and Hollywood, CA
Copyright Claimant:
The Ladd Company
Copyright Date:
5 October 1982
Copyright Number:
PA154320
Physical Properties:
Sound, also silent
Dolby Stereo® in selected theaters
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex Camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
105
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26532
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the early hours of the morning, two men chase a pimp through the alleys of New York City and push him out a window. A coroner brings his body to the City Morgue, where prostitute Belinda Keaton identifies him as Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jones. She also recognizes the mortician, Chuck Lumley, but he nervously insists they could never have met because he is engaged. Later, Chuck’s supervisor reassigns him to the night shift to open a daytime slot for his recently-hired nephew. Chuck returns home to tell his fitness-obsessed fiancée, Charlotte Koogle, that he has to work nights. The next evening, Chuck’s eccentric new partner, Bill “Billy Blaze” Blazejowski dances into the office listening to a cassette tape player, and rambles about his various ambitions as an entrepreneur. On Chuck’s night off, Charlotte asks him to turn out the lights because she is self-conscious about the weight she wants to lose before their wedding. They begin to make love, but Charlotte becomes distracted by the neighbor’s loud music. Chuck approaches the neighbor’s door and realizes it is Belinda’s home. She agrees to lower the volume, but Charlotte leaves anyway, wracked with guilt from cheating on her diet. At work, Chuck tells Bill that he used to be an investment counselor on Wall Street before opting for a quieter job at the morgue. He later discovers that Bill has been using the hearse as a limousine service to make extra money. One night, Chuck becomes annoyed with Bill’s incessant talking and hurts Bill’s feelings, causing him to hide in one of the morgue drawers until Chuck apologizes. In the morning, Chuck finds Belinda sitting in the elevator with a ... +


In the early hours of the morning, two men chase a pimp through the alleys of New York City and push him out a window. A coroner brings his body to the City Morgue, where prostitute Belinda Keaton identifies him as Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jones. She also recognizes the mortician, Chuck Lumley, but he nervously insists they could never have met because he is engaged. Later, Chuck’s supervisor reassigns him to the night shift to open a daytime slot for his recently-hired nephew. Chuck returns home to tell his fitness-obsessed fiancée, Charlotte Koogle, that he has to work nights. The next evening, Chuck’s eccentric new partner, Bill “Billy Blaze” Blazejowski dances into the office listening to a cassette tape player, and rambles about his various ambitions as an entrepreneur. On Chuck’s night off, Charlotte asks him to turn out the lights because she is self-conscious about the weight she wants to lose before their wedding. They begin to make love, but Charlotte becomes distracted by the neighbor’s loud music. Chuck approaches the neighbor’s door and realizes it is Belinda’s home. She agrees to lower the volume, but Charlotte leaves anyway, wracked with guilt from cheating on her diet. At work, Chuck tells Bill that he used to be an investment counselor on Wall Street before opting for a quieter job at the morgue. He later discovers that Bill has been using the hearse as a limousine service to make extra money. One night, Chuck becomes annoyed with Bill’s incessant talking and hurts Bill’s feelings, causing him to hide in one of the morgue drawers until Chuck apologizes. In the morning, Chuck finds Belinda sitting in the elevator with a bloody nose and attempts to help her, but a group of Girl Scouts mistake him for a mugger and beat him with cookie boxes. While Chuck ices his injuries, Belinda explains that a client abused her when she demanded her pay. As a result, she and many other prostitutes feel unsafe working without Franklin as their pimp. When Chuck tells Bill about Belinda’s accident, Bill suggests they run a prostitution operation from the morgue and call themselves “love brokers.” In the morning, Belinda visits Chuck and cooks him breakfast in her underwear. Over the next few weeks, Bill pleads with Chuck to agree to his plan. During Thanksgiving dinner with his mother, Charlotte, and his conservative future in-laws, Chuck receives a telephone call from Belinda, who was arrested for assault and will be taken to night court. The family insists on accompanying Chuck to the courthouse, where they watch as Belinda’s prosecutor lowers his pants to reveal the bite mark she left on his posterior for refusing to pay for her services. Charlotte’s mother faints, and Chuck’s family insists he move out of the building. Chuck later visits Billy’s apartment and consents to his prostitution scheme. In the morgue, Chuck proposes to only charge the prostitutes a ten percent fee for their management services, allowing the girls to keep more of their earnings. Over time, Chuck develops pension plans for the girls, who use the extra cash to upgrade their wardrobes and move into nicer apartments; Chuck, however, stashes his money in his kitchen cupboard. Eventually, Chuck becomes ill with anxiety, knowing that he is enabling women to have sex with strange and sometimes dangerous men. One night, Bill hosts a fraternity party in the morgue, and Chuck’s anxiety worsens when he discovers people having sex in the drawers. When he speaks to Belinda about the party, he realizes he has doubts about his own lackluster sex life with Charlotte. Later, Chuck and Bill take the girls to a hamburger restaurant and announce that they are now the franchise owners. Meanwhile, the two men who killed Franklin conspire to discover who has taken over his business. At a Christmas party, the girls express their gratitude to Chuck for improving their lives. The next morning, Chuck, still intoxicated, shows Bill and Belinda the ornate headstone for his father’s grave that he purchased with his savings. In Belinda’s apartment, she and Chuck admit their mutual attraction and make love. Afterward, while laying together in the bathtub, Belinda insists that she did not fake her orgasm. That night, Chuck enters the office singing and dancing with joy. When Belinda shows up for work, however, Chuck is offended that she does not plan to quit prostitution. Bill drives a teary Belinda to her assignment, but upon admitting that she loves Chuck, he gives her the night off. While Chuck works at the office alone, Franklin’s killers enter, tie him to a gurney, and begin to torture him. Meanwhile, Bill unknowingly brings two undercover police officers to the morgue, where they save Chuck by shooting at the intruders and arresting them, along with Chuck and Bill. When Charlotte visits Chuck in prison, she spits in his face and ends their engagement. Chuck and Bill’s lawyer informs them that the mayor agreed to restore their jobs in order to avoid a scandal during the upcoming election season. Chuck is relieved to return to his former life, but Bill wants to use his position of power to make demands from the mayor, and Chuck beats him up. Sometime later, he runs into Belinda, who announces that she has found work at a gentleman’s club and plans to move to a new condominium at the end of the week. Moments later, an apathetic deliveryman arrives with an order for Chuck containing the incorrect sandwich, for which Chuck demands a replacement. Bolstered with confidence, Chuck barges into Belinda’s club and runs into Bill, who was fired from his job as a towel boy moments earlier. When Belinda arrives, she immediately changes her mind about her new job. Chuck tells Belinda he loves her, and they kiss. The manager attempts to eject Chuck, Bill, and Belinda from the club, but Chuck pushes him into the pool and joins his friends as they run into Times Square. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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