Porky's (1982)

R | 94 or 97 mins | Comedy | 19 March 1982

Director:

Bob Clark

Writer:

Bob Clark

Producers:

Don Carmody, Bob Clark

Cinematographer:

Reginald H. Morris

Editor:

Stan Cole

Production Designer:

Reuben Freed
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HISTORY

In the final shot of the film, “Tommy Turner” shrugs at the camera and exclaims, “Jeez!”
       End credits include the following statement: “Producers wish to thank for their co-operation: Mary Lee Lander; Metro Dade County Florida Office of Film and Television Co-ordination; Evinrude Motors; Porky's Sign by Acolite Sign Company; Telephone Pioneers of America – Florida Gold Coast Chapter No. 3; Fort Lauderdale & South Florida region of the Antique Automobile Club of America; Mercury Club of South Florida.”
       Production company Astral Film Productions, also known as Astral Bellevue Pathé, Inc., is credited onscreen as “Astral Bellevue Pathe Inc.” Assistant bookkeeper Céline Daignault is listed onscreen as “Celine Daignault.” Makeup artist Valli Slutsky is credited as “Aunt Valli,” while assistant makeup artist Linda Gill is credited as “Aunt Linda.”
       Various contemporary sources misspelled the title as Porkeys and Porkies.
       According to an article in the 25 May 1982 edition of Us magazine, writer-producer-director Bob Clark began writing Porky’s as a novel when he was sixteen years old, based on his childhood memories growing up in Fort Lauderdale, FL. Production notes in AMPAS library files suggested that Clark conceived the project as a motion picture when he decided to become a filmmaker after finishing college, and he completed the screenplay in 1979. According to the 22 Jan 1979 HR, Clark hoped to begin principal photography in summer 1979, with a schedule that alternated between filming and editing. However, Clark delayed the project in order to direct Tribute (1980, see entry) for Twentieth Century-Fox. An early 1980 DV article indicated that filming of Porky’s ... More Less

In the final shot of the film, “Tommy Turner” shrugs at the camera and exclaims, “Jeez!”
       End credits include the following statement: “Producers wish to thank for their co-operation: Mary Lee Lander; Metro Dade County Florida Office of Film and Television Co-ordination; Evinrude Motors; Porky's Sign by Acolite Sign Company; Telephone Pioneers of America – Florida Gold Coast Chapter No. 3; Fort Lauderdale & South Florida region of the Antique Automobile Club of America; Mercury Club of South Florida.”
       Production company Astral Film Productions, also known as Astral Bellevue Pathé, Inc., is credited onscreen as “Astral Bellevue Pathe Inc.” Assistant bookkeeper Céline Daignault is listed onscreen as “Celine Daignault.” Makeup artist Valli Slutsky is credited as “Aunt Valli,” while assistant makeup artist Linda Gill is credited as “Aunt Linda.”
       Various contemporary sources misspelled the title as Porkeys and Porkies.
       According to an article in the 25 May 1982 edition of Us magazine, writer-producer-director Bob Clark began writing Porky’s as a novel when he was sixteen years old, based on his childhood memories growing up in Fort Lauderdale, FL. Production notes in AMPAS library files suggested that Clark conceived the project as a motion picture when he decided to become a filmmaker after finishing college, and he completed the screenplay in 1979. According to the 22 Jan 1979 HR, Clark hoped to begin principal photography in summer 1979, with a schedule that alternated between filming and editing. However, Clark delayed the project in order to direct Tribute (1980, see entry) for Twentieth Century-Fox. An early 1980 DV article indicated that filming of Porky’s would not begin until early 1981, and the Dec 1980 Filmworld listed a start date of Feb 1981.
       As reported in the 14 Apr 1982 HR, actor John Marley had given the script to Simon/Reeves/Landsburg Prods. production chief, Mitt Goldstein, during a poker game, who then showed it to company partner, Melvin Simon. Simon purportedly liked the screenplay, but wanted to finance the film as a Canadian co-production in order to take advantage of Canada’s tax incentives. The 24 Nov 1982 Var stated that, in fall 1980, Simon “dropped the film and decided [he] was not prepared to totally finance” with Twentieth Century-Fox. He later discussed the project with Canada’s Astral Bellevue Pathé, Inc. company head Harold Greenberg, who, due to dwindling Canadian film investment, refused to make features that did not have “at least 50% equity financing coming from industry sources and a guaranteed distribution deal.” Upon realizing that the film could not be financed publicly through tax shelter money, Greenberg instead asked Fox for additional funding. Although the studio initially refused, Fox executive Norman Levy offered to cover 25%. The 14 Apr 1982 HR stated that Greenberg and Simon each fronted 37.5% of the remaining costs and received executive producer credits. According to the 15 Apr 1982 HR, attorney Arnold Kopelson provided Clark with enough development money to prepare a first draft of the screenplay, but withdrew his involvement once Simon joined the project in exchange for a percentage of the film’s profits. While Us reported that Simon contributed $4.2 million, several contemporary sources and press materials listed the final cost at $4.5 million.
       27 Feb 1981 HR production charts announced that principal photography began 9 Feb 1981 in North Miami, FL. Production notes indicated that “Porky’s” nightclub set was built inside a defunct restaurant. The 14 Apr 1982 HR stated that production concluded 17 Apr 1981, and the film received an X rating after its first test screening in May 1981. However, Us claimed that various scenes were removed or edited for nudity and language, in order to amend the rating to an R. According to a 2 Oct 1981 LAHExam brief, this included Kim Cattrall’s sex scene, which the actress re-shot in Toronto, Canada.
       The 14 Apr 1982 HR reported that the picture received positive feedback from screenings at the Glasshouse Theater in San Diego, CA, where it ran alongside An American Werewolf in London (1981, see entry) on 4 Sep 1981, and in Dallas, TX, on 18 Sep 1981. It then opened 13 Nov 1981 for test engagements in Columbia, SC, and Colorado Springs, CO. A Jan 1982 Box advertisement listed box office reports from the 2 Dec 1981 Var, claiming that the film collected more than $127,000 over seventeen days in one Colorado Springs theater and two Columbia theaters. According to the 14 Apr 1982 HR, Fox aimed to boost word-of-mouth publicity, spending $500,000 on “sneak” screenings in key markets prior to the 19 Mar 1982 national release. In total, marketing and promotional costs totaled $5 million.
       Porky’s opened 19 Mar 1982 in Los Angeles, CA, and 20 Mar 1982 in New York City. The 24 Mar 1982 LAT reported a domestic gross of $7.6 million in 1,200 theaters during its opening weekend. On 30 Mar 1982, HR stated that print advertisements were altered to boost appeal among older audiences. After two weeks in release, the 6 Apr 1982 HR reported that the film had expanded to a total of 1,159 theaters throughout the U.S. and Canada. In Jul 1982, a Fox press release announced that Porky’s had earned $100,685,055. According to the 24 Nov 1982 Var, Porky’s became the highest-grossing Canadian-financed film to date, with Astral’s profit ranging between $10-12 million. In addition, Greenberg expected to earn $10 million in pay-television sales and $6 million from free U.S. television licensing. A 9 Mar 1983 DV article reported that although SLM Entertainment Ltd. previously had a private investment deal with Fox, the company was only eligible to earn a portion of Fox’s share on the picture, amounting to less than one-third of the total profits.
       The film marked the motion picture debut of Mark Herrier.
       Conflicting information from various contemporary reviews list the runtime at ninety-four and ninety-seven minutes.
       On 11 Jun 1983, Billboard announced that Fox Video Games released a Porky’s video game for Atari, Mattel, and Coleco.
       Just weeks after Porky’s theatrical release, the 6 Apr 1982 HR announced production of a sequel titled Porky’s II: The Next Day (1983, see entry), and the franchise continued with Porky’s Revenge (1985, see entry). In 1984, however, the 19 Sep 1984 Var reported that on 13 Sep 1984, Arnold Kopelson of Film Packages Inc. (FPI) sued Bob Clark, Clark’s production company Brandywine Film Prods., and Harold D. Cohen, who is not credited onscreen. Kopelson alleged that, in Jan 1980, Melvin Simon only agreed to finance the first Porky’s film if Kopelson was not involved; although Kopelson doubled the initial $20,000 advance he granted Clark to write the screenplay, his share of the producers’ assets was reduced from 50% to 33.3%. As of 31 Mar 1984, FPI had only received 20% of the promised earnings, and Kopelson demanded he be restored to his original 50% share for Porky’s and its 1983 sequel, which amounted to $905,296 compensatory and $5 million in punitive damages. On 13 Aug 1985, DV reported that Kopelson was awarded $1,105,000. The 24 Jun 1987 Var claimed that Kopelson returned to court to request that Brandywine be banned from transferring any funds until API received compensation. A 24 Jul 1987 HR news item stated that Kopelson was granted the right to attach the assets.
       Meanwhile, a 26 Jul 1985 HR brief indicated that the band, The Crew Cuts, credited onscreen as The Crewcuts, filed a $35 million lawsuit against Fox, CBS-Fox Video, Astral, and Polygram Inc., for using the songs “Earth Angel” and “Sh-Boom, Sh-Boom,” without permission. The outcome of that dispute could not be determined as of the writing of this Note.
       According to a 26 Jun 2013 HR article, Lotano Investments obtained the film and sequel rights under production company Mola Entertainment in the early 1990s. On 20 Sep 1996, HR reported that the Toronto-based Protocol Entertainment and Los Angeles-based Valhalla Pictures acquired the motion picture and television sequel rights to the Porky’s franchise, preparing a new film for production in Toronto in spring 1997. A 15 Jan 1997 HR article stated that Protocol executives Paul Bronfman and Steve Levitan would instead executive produce a United Paramount Network (UPN) television series adaptation alongside Valhalla’s Daniel Harris and Constantino Magnatta, and Head of the Class (ABC 17 Sep 1986—25 Jun 1991) creator, Rich Eustis, who also wrote the pilot. Years later, the 1 Nov 2002 DV announced that Levitan and Bronfman were expected to produce a modern-day Porky’s remake with Enrique Cerezo, Joel Roodman, and Dan Gross’ Arclight Films, while radio personality Howard Stern would executive produce under the banner “Howard Stern Presents...” Gross reportedly spent more than a year acquiring rights to the property, and planned to begin production before summer 2003. According to the 15 Jun 2005 DV, Bronfman sold his 50% share of Protocol ownership, and would instead produce with Stern through his studio and equipment services company, Comweb Group. Six years later, the 26 Jun 2013 HR claimed that, due to the contract deal stipulations with Lotano, Mola produced Porky’s: The College Years for $1.5 million. The film was later re-titled and released on home video in 2009 as Pimpin’ Pee Wee. However, in a 2011 lawsuit, Lotano determined that Mola could not produce another sequel because Pimpin’ Pee Wee did not meet the agreed upon $10 million budgetary minimum. Although the parties reached a confidential settlement, the article stated that the status of Stern and Bronfman’s feature rights remained uncertain. As of 16 Apr 2014, neither a motion picture remake nor sequel has been produced. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Billboard
11 Jun 1983.
---
Box Office
Jan 1982.
---
Daily Variety
13 Mar 1981.
---
Daily Variety
9 Mar 1983
p. 1, 30.
Daily Variety
13 Aug 1985.
---
Daily Variety
1 Nov 2002
p. 23.
Daily Variety
15 Jun 2005.
---
Filmworld
Dec 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jan 1979
p. 56.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Feb 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Nov 1981
p. 25.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Mar 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Apr 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Apr 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Apr 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jul 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jul 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Sep 1996
p. 3, 38.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jan 1997
p. 3, 41.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jun 2013
p. 6.
LAHExam
2 Oct 1981.
---
Los Angeles Times
23 Mar 1982
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
24 Mar 1982.
---
Los Angeles Times
14 Apr 1982.
---
New York Times
20 Mar 1982
p. 13.
Us
25 May 1982
p. 46.
Variety
18 Nov 1981
p. 15.
Variety
2 Dec 1981.
---
Variety
25 May 1982
p. 46.
Variety
24 Nov 1982
p. 36.
Variety
19 Sep 1984.
---
Variety
24 Jun 1987.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
a Melvin Simon Productions/Astral Bellevue Pathe Inc presentation of
Bob Clark's
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
3d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
Wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
3d asst cam
Panaglide op
Steadicam op
Still photog
Best boy
Generator op
Key grip
Asst key grip
Grip
Grip
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dept coord
Asst art dir
2d asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
2d asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Prop master
Asst props
Asst set dec
Const coord
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost des
Ward mistress
Ward asst
Ward asst
MUSIC
Mus
Mus consultant
SOUND
Post prod sd ed
Loc sd mixer
Cableman
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Eff ed
Eff ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff man
Spec eff asst
Optical eff and titles by
Optical eff and titles by
Optical eff and titles by
MAKEUP
Makeup
Makeup asst
Hair des
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Prod exec
Prod exec
Prod accountant
Astral Film Productions creative liaison
Simon Distribution Inc. representative
Asst to the prods
Unit mgr
Prod office coord
Bookkeeper
Asst bookkeeper
Exec asst
Craft service
Addl casting by
Food service by
Vehicle coord
Unit pub
Post prod supv
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Florida State Film intern
Florida State Film intern
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Business affairs
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
SOURCES
SONGS
"Mockingbird," by Patti Page, courtesy of Phonogram Inc.
"Lovesick Blues," by Hank Williams, courtesy of MGM Inc.
"Til I Waltz Again With You," by Teresa Brewer, courtesy of Phonogram Inc.
+
SONGS
"Mockingbird," by Patti Page, courtesy of Phonogram Inc.
"Lovesick Blues," by Hank Williams, courtesy of MGM Inc.
"Til I Waltz Again With You," by Teresa Brewer, courtesy of Phonogram Inc.
"Only You," by The Platters, courtesy of Phonogram Inc.
"Why Don't You Believe Me," by Joni James, courtesy of MGM Inc.
"Maybelline," by Chuck Berry, courtesy of Phonogram Inc.
"How High The Moon," by Les Paul, courtesy of London Records Inc.
"Ebb Tide," by Frank Chacksfield, courtesy of Decca Records Co., Ltd.
"Anytime," by Eddie Fisher, courtesy of RCA Inc.
"Tennessee Waltz," by Patti Page, courtesy of Phonogram Inc.
"Goodnight Irene," by The Weavers, courtesy of MCA Inc.
"Your Cheatin' Heart," by Hank Williams, courtesy of MGM Inc.
"Cold, Cold Heart," by Hank Williams, courtesy of MGM Inc.
"Earth Angel," by The Crewcuts, courtesy of Phonogram Inc.
"Sh-Boom, Sh-Boom," by The Crewcuts, courtesy of Phonogram Inc.
"Heartthrobs," by Lobman Poleglaze.
+
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
19 March 1982
Premiere Information:
Columbia, SC, and Colorado Springs, CO, opening: 13 November 1981
Los Angeles opening: 19 March 1982
New York opening: 20 March 1982
Production Date:
9 February--17 April 1981 in Miami, FL, and fall 1981 in Toronto, Canada
Copyright Claimant:
Porky's Production (Astral), Inc.
Copyright Date:
18 March 1982
Copyright Number:
PA130564
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
94 or 97
MPAA Rating:
R
Countries:
Canada, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26384
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1954 Angel Beach, Florida, teenager Edward “Pee Wee” Morris wakes up with an erection and measures its length with a ruler, comparing the number to a chart hidden under his mattress. At Angel Beach High School, Pee Wee meets his friends, Mickey Jarvis and Billy McCarthy, who tease him for failing to lose his virginity to a girl named Wendy Williams. Meanwhile, across the schoolyard, a freshman girl asks a large, athletic student named Anthony “Meat” Tuperello about the origin of his nickname. Meat offers to have sex with her, but realizes he cannot risk losing his possible scholarship to Princeton University by getting suspended. During basketball practice, Coach Fred Warren advises Coach Roy Brackett how to seduce the virginal girls’ aerobics instructor, Miss Honeywell, whom he calls “Lassie.” In the locker room, Billy asks his teammate, Tim Cavanaugh, to invite Brian Schwartz to the team gathering that evening, but Tim refuses because Brian is Jewish. Billy, Jarvis, and Pee Wee enter a crawlspace under the school in hopes of watching one of the female teachers shower through a hole in the wall. That night, Billy and Tommy take the basketball team to a run-down shack in the Everglades, where they undress in anticipation of having sex with a prostitute named Cherry Forever. After Cherry inspects the boys’ genitalia, she, Billy, and Tommy stage a practical joke to fool the boys into thinking they have been attacked by an African-American man, causing them to flee naked into the woods. Teammate Mickey’s police officer brother, Ted Jarvis, finds Pee Wee and drops him off with the rest of the boys at the diner, dressed in nothing but an oversized ... +


In 1954 Angel Beach, Florida, teenager Edward “Pee Wee” Morris wakes up with an erection and measures its length with a ruler, comparing the number to a chart hidden under his mattress. At Angel Beach High School, Pee Wee meets his friends, Mickey Jarvis and Billy McCarthy, who tease him for failing to lose his virginity to a girl named Wendy Williams. Meanwhile, across the schoolyard, a freshman girl asks a large, athletic student named Anthony “Meat” Tuperello about the origin of his nickname. Meat offers to have sex with her, but realizes he cannot risk losing his possible scholarship to Princeton University by getting suspended. During basketball practice, Coach Fred Warren advises Coach Roy Brackett how to seduce the virginal girls’ aerobics instructor, Miss Honeywell, whom he calls “Lassie.” In the locker room, Billy asks his teammate, Tim Cavanaugh, to invite Brian Schwartz to the team gathering that evening, but Tim refuses because Brian is Jewish. Billy, Jarvis, and Pee Wee enter a crawlspace under the school in hopes of watching one of the female teachers shower through a hole in the wall. That night, Billy and Tommy take the basketball team to a run-down shack in the Everglades, where they undress in anticipation of having sex with a prostitute named Cherry Forever. After Cherry inspects the boys’ genitalia, she, Billy, and Tommy stage a practical joke to fool the boys into thinking they have been attacked by an African-American man, causing them to flee naked into the woods. Teammate Mickey’s police officer brother, Ted Jarvis, finds Pee Wee and drops him off with the rest of the boys at the diner, dressed in nothing but an oversized uniform shirt. After Pee Wee changes clothes, Jarvis proposes they drive to Porky’s swamp-side nightclub in the neighboring county, so Pee Wee can have sex with one of the dancers. At basketball practice, Coach Brackett plans to have sex with Miss Honeywell in the upstairs uniform room. After dark, Pee Wee, Tim, Mickey, and Meat drive to Porky’s, where Mickey offers Porky $100 to spend an hour with five of his dancers in the private boudoir known as “Porky’s Pen.” Afraid of getting in trouble with the police for serving minors, Porky offers the boys three women for thirty minutes, and instructs them to go upstairs in the dark. However, Porky pulls a lever that releases the floor, and the boys fall into the swamp. Mickey initiates a fight with Porky, but a sheriff arrives, smashes Mickey’s headlights, and threatens to arrest the boys unless they return home. Once back in Angel Beach, Mickey vows to return to Porky’s for revenge, but his brother, Ted, warns that the sheriff was Porky’s brother. At school, Tim is suspended from the basketball team for playing aggressively. After Tim fights Brian outside, Billy and Mickey explain that Tim has misguided racial prejudices. That night, at the diner, Pee Wee prank telephones Wendy, and two police officers threaten to arrest Meat, who has become intoxicated after being rejected from Princeton. Brian interrupts the detainment, however, and convinces the officers to let Meat go. Just then, Mickey returns from Porky’s covered in blood, announcing that he broke Porky’s hand. Later, in the locker room, the boys learn that Tim’s father beat him for losing his fight against Brian, prompting Brian to speak to Coach Warren on the boy's behalf. Meanwhile, Miss Honeywell insults her homely colleague, Miss Beulah Balbricker, for judging her flirtation with Coach Brackett. Angry, Miss Honeywell drags Coach Brackett upstairs to have sex, but she screams in ecstasy so loudly that everyone in the gymnasium hears her. After practice, the boys watch their female counterparts shower through the crawlspace peephole, but Pee Wee gives them away when he yells at an overweight girl blocking his view. Encouraged by the girls’ amusement, Tommy puts his penis through the hole, and Miss Balbricker grabs it. Although Tommy escapes, she claims to recognize his penis and suggests that the school principal, Mr. Carter, create a line-up to identify him; Mr. Carter, however, laughs at her proposal. During a school dance, Tim’s father attacks his son until Coach Brackett forces him to leave. Mickey arrives, bleeding and severely injured from a night of fighting with Porky. After Mickey goes to the hospital, Coach Brackett announces he will be leaving the school at the end of the semester and invites the boys to call him “Roy,” as he plans to help them exact revenge on Porky. Tim makes amends with Brian, and the two drive to the nightclub together. Coach Brackett and the boys rig the bridge outside the club to their truck so it will fall apart. Once Porky’s closes, Billy invites Porky into the parking lot and they pull down the bridge, causing the building supports to give way and the entire building to collapse. Meanwhile, the boys sabotage the police vehicles in order to stop Porky’s brother from arriving. Porky and the sheriff chase the delinquents in Porky’s car, but the boys cross the county line, where they are greeted by Ted, the Angel Beach High School student body, and the marching band. Ted questions Porky for allowing underage boys inside his establishment and shoots holes in Porky’s car. Porky agrees to excuse the boys’ actions, and the teenagers rejoice. As Pee Wee laments his virginity, Wendy agrees to have sex with him in a school bus. He borrows a condom from his friends, but complains that it is too large. Miss Balbricker emerges from the bushes and attacks Tommy, attempting to expose his penis. Police officers pull her away as Pee Wee announces he has finally lost his virginity. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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