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HISTORY


       Actor André Maranne is credited onscreen as “Andre Maranne.”
       According to a 25 Apr 1982 LAT article, filmmaker Blake Edwards was approached about making another Pink Panther film just months after Sellers’ death, but was preoccupied working on Victor/Victoria (1982, see entry). Eventually, he decided to write a script around excised footage from The Pink Panther (1963, see entry), A Shot in the Dark (1964, see entry), The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976, see entry), and Revenge of the Pink Panther (1978, see entry). Return of the Pink Panther (1975, see entry) was not included, as Edwards discovered that its producer, Sir Lew Grade, had destroyed all extraneous material from the picture. A total of eight sequences were used to comprise one third of Trail of the Pink Panther, while the remaining screen time consisted of replayed scenes from previous films, linked together by an original storyline involving reporter “Marie Jouvet,” played by Joanna Lumley. Screenwriters Frank and Tom Waldman wrote the scripts for Trail of the Pink Panther and Curse of the Pink Panther simultaneously, and planned to shoot them on a combined budget of $17 million, using many of the same sets. A 9 Mar 1982 HR article indicated that $6 million of that total was alotted for Trail of the Pink Panther, with an eighteen-week shooting schedule expected to take place in Paris and Nice, France; Valencia, Ibiza, and Cortina, Spain; and Casablanca. Trail of the Pink Panther was anticipated to be released 10 Dec 1982, followed ... More Less


       Actor André Maranne is credited onscreen as “Andre Maranne.”
       According to a 25 Apr 1982 LAT article, filmmaker Blake Edwards was approached about making another Pink Panther film just months after Sellers’ death, but was preoccupied working on Victor/Victoria (1982, see entry). Eventually, he decided to write a script around excised footage from The Pink Panther (1963, see entry), A Shot in the Dark (1964, see entry), The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976, see entry), and Revenge of the Pink Panther (1978, see entry). Return of the Pink Panther (1975, see entry) was not included, as Edwards discovered that its producer, Sir Lew Grade, had destroyed all extraneous material from the picture. A total of eight sequences were used to comprise one third of Trail of the Pink Panther, while the remaining screen time consisted of replayed scenes from previous films, linked together by an original storyline involving reporter “Marie Jouvet,” played by Joanna Lumley. Screenwriters Frank and Tom Waldman wrote the scripts for Trail of the Pink Panther and Curse of the Pink Panther simultaneously, and planned to shoot them on a combined budget of $17 million, using many of the same sets. A 9 Mar 1982 HR article indicated that $6 million of that total was alotted for Trail of the Pink Panther, with an eighteen-week shooting schedule expected to take place in Paris and Nice, France; Valencia, Ibiza, and Cortina, Spain; and Casablanca. Trail of the Pink Panther was anticipated to be released 10 Dec 1982, followed by Curse of the Pink Panther in summer 1983.
       A 10 Feb 1982 DV brief announced that principal photography was set to begin 15 Feb 1982 at Pinewood Studios in London, England, followed by an 11 Feb 1982 DV report that actor Harvey Korman would arrive in London 6 Mar 1982 to reprise his role as “Professor Auguste Balls.” A 13 Apr 1982 HR story stated that filming was currently taking place in Valencia, assisted by security of Spain’s Policia Nacional and the U.S. Treasury Department, which protected actress Patti Davis, who was the daughter of then-President Ronald Reagan. Production was then scheduled to return to Pinewood Studios, while a second unit remained in Spain to shoot footage on the island of Ibiza. According to the article, the production schedule had been extended to twenty-two weeks, and also included the Italian town of Cortina d’Ampezzo among locations.
       The 14 Apr 1982 Var reported that actress Joanna Lumley joined the crew in the French Riviera, while Capucine and David Niven filmed footage for both projects at Victorine Studios in Nice. Production notes in AMPAS library files stated that French production manager Bernard Mazauric worked with a sixty-person crew on an unnamed property in the French Riviera, which served as the villa owned by “Sir Charles Litton” and “Lady Litton” in the film. Additional estate locations included the Château de Bellet and the Château Castellaras. “Hercule Lajoy’s” barge and the “Lugash” mosque sequences took place in Paris and at the Sacré Cœur basilica in the city’s Montmarte district. A second unit also worked in Italy to film a stunt skier for a shot that would precede footage from the first 1963 film. According to the 7 Apr 1982 DV and 11 May 1982 HR, Edwards was pleased with Davis’ performance in Valencia and subsequently wrote another scene for her character, requiring her to travel to Paris for further filming. A 15 Jun 1982 HR item announced the completion of principal photography, fifteen days ahead of schedule and slightly over the two films’ total projected budget.
       Although editor Ralph Winters is not credited onscreen, Trail of the Pink Panther and Curse of the Pink Panther marked his tenth and eleventh feature film collaborations with Edwards, following their most recent work together on Victor/Victoria, which was released 19 Mar 1982.
       The 14 Jul 1982 Var indicated that the film’s score was recorded with an eighty-member orchestra at CTS Studios in London. A 3 Sep 1982 HR brief stated that Ron Baker was hired to work on sound looping at Pinewood Studios, but he is not credited onscreen. A 10 Aug 1983 DV news story revealed that impressionist Rich Little recorded much of the dialogue for actor David Niven, who suffered from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. To prevent public speculation about Niven’s ailing health, Little’s involvement was kept secret until after the actor’s death on 29 Jul 1982.
       The 28 Jul 1982 Var credited Anthony Goldschmidt and the Intralink Film Graphic Design Co. for trailers and advertising campaign promoting the film’s 17 Dec 1982 release.
       On 20 Dec 1982, HR announced that Sellers’ widow, Lynne Fredrick, filed a multimillion dollar lawsuit in London court against United Artists (UA) of distributor M-G-M/UA Entertainment Co., and Blake Edwards’ Lakeline Productions Limited, claiming that the late actor’s contracts on the Pink Panther films did not allow for the posthumous use of his work. The case finally went to trial three years later, when the 27 Feb 1985 DV reported that although the defendants claimed they were never prohibited from releasing the footage, Sellers’ lawyer argued the actor’s perfectionism indicated that the decision would go against his wishes. The 25 May 1985 Chicago Tribune stated that Frederick was approached about the concept for the film only three days after Sellers’ death, and the project entered production despite her opposition. After a nineteen-day hearing in Mar 1985, a London judge ruled that Trail of the Pink Panther breached the Performers Protection Act, designed to uphold the works of performing artists, and awarded Frederick $1 million in damages. Although the court denied her request to bar the film from further exhibition, an 11 Jun 1985 DV news item indicated that the widow was granted an additional $475,000 interest from the earlier settlement. UA appealed the court’s decision, but the 17 Dec 1986 Var stated that their attempts were unsuccessful.
      Animated opening credits are preceded by following dedication to actor Peter Sellers, who died 24 Jul 1980, before production began: “To Peter...the one and only Inspector Clouseau.” End credits conclude with the following statements: “The producers wish to thank the following companies and organizations for their collaboration in the making of this film: Hyatt Regency Hotel – Nice, Trans World Airlines, Paris – Sheraton Hotel, Hitachi Corporation, Aeroport de Paris, H. Stern Jewelry, Mairie de Nice, Renault/American Motors, Mairie d’Antibes, Animal Action,” and, “Made by Lakeline Productions Limited and Amjo Productions Limited at Pinewood Studios, Iver, Bucks, England, and on location in Paris the South of France and Cortina, Italy.” The statement, “Coming Soon Curse of the Pink Panther, advertises the next Pink Panther film, which was shot concurrently and released 12 Aug 1983.

              The film concludes with the animated "Pink Panther" character appearing onscreen and opening its trench coat to reveal outtake footage from the previous Pink Panther films, which play alongside the end credits. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Chicago Tribune
25 May 1985.
---
Daily Variety
10 Feb 1982.
---
Daily Variety
11 Feb 1982.
---
Daily Variety
7 Apr 1982.
---
Daily Variety
10 Aug 1983.
---
Daily Variety
27 Feb 1985.
---
Daily Variety
11 Jun 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Mar 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Apr 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 May 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jun 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Sep 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Dec 1982
p. 8, 18.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Dec 1982.
---
Los Angeles Times
25 Apr 1982
p. 24.
Los Angeles Times
20 Dec 1982
p. 2.
New York Times
17 Dec 1982
p. 16.
Screen International
20 Feb 1982.
---
Variety
14 Apr 1982.
---
Variety
14 Jul 1982.
---
Variety
28 Jul 1982.
---
Variety
29 Jul 1982.
---
Variety
15 Dec 1982
p. 17.
Variety
17 Dec 1986.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Presented by Blake Edwards Entertainment
A Titan Productions Feature
from MGM/UA Entertainment Co.
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
Dir, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
Prod mgr, 2d unit
Prod mgr, French unit
1st asst dir, French unit
3d asst dir
Dir asst, USA
Paris prod mgr
Spain prod mgr
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Focus puller
Clapper/Loader
Cam grip
Stills photog
Elec supv
Cam, 2d unit
Cam op, 2d unit
Focus puller, 2d unit
Clapper/Loader, 2d unit
Cam grip, 2d unit
Stills photog, 2d unit
Elec supv, 2d unit
Video asst
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Supv art dir
Art dir
Art dir
Art dept, French unit
Sketch artist
Art dept runner
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Const mgr
Const mgr
Prod buyer
Prop master
Standby props
Chargehand propman, 2d unit
Propman, 2d unit
Draughtsman
Draughtsman
Junior draughtsman
Asst const mgr
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Chargehand dressing propman
Dressing propman
Dressing propman
Standby propman
Standby propman
Storeman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Ward mistress
Ward master, 2d unit
Ward master
Ward asst
MUSIC
Mus ed
Lyricist
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Sd eng
Sd eff des by
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Chief dubbing mixer
Dubbing mixer
Dubbing mixer
Sd mixer, 2d unit
VISUAL EFFECTS
Title anim based on the anim characters [by]
Title anim based on the anim characters [by]
Title anim wrt and dir by
Spec eff supv
Spec eff supv, 2d unit
Spec eff supv
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff runner
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
MAKEUP
Hair des consultant
of Michaeljohn
Chief hairdresser
Chief hairdresser
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairdresser, 2d unit
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Asst casting dir
Prod supv
Dir of pub
Prod accountant
Cont asst
Prod asst
Asst to Mr. Edwards
Asst to Mr. Adams
Prods' asst
Loc mgr, 2d unit
Continuity, 2d unit
Casting dir, French unit
Asst accountant
Accounts asst
Prod runner
Driver to Mr. Edwards
Unit driver
Unit driver
Unit driver
Unit driver
Nice prod asst
Paris prod asst
Spain prod asst
Spain interpreter
Cashier
Parascender
Parascender
STAND INS
Stunt arranger
Stuntman
Stuntman
COLOR PERSONNEL
Processed by
Prints in
SOURCES
SONGS
"I'll Never Smile Again," by Ruth Lowe
"I'm Gonna Wash That Man Right Out Of My Hair," lyric by Oscar Hammerstein II, music by Richard Rodgers
"Singing In The Rain," lyric by Arthur Freed, music by Nacio Herb Brown
+
SONGS
"I'll Never Smile Again," by Ruth Lowe
"I'm Gonna Wash That Man Right Out Of My Hair," lyric by Oscar Hammerstein II, music by Richard Rodgers
"Singing In The Rain," lyric by Arthur Freed, music by Nacio Herb Brown
"You Go To My Head," lyric by Haven Gillespie, music by J. Fred Coots.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 December 1982
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 17 December 1982
Production Date:
15 February--mid June 1982
Copyright Claimant:
United Artists Corporation
Copyright Date:
18 February 1983
Copyright Number:
PA170084
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
97
MPAA Rating:
PG
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26805
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Unaware that he is being watched by members of the Mafia, French Sûreté Chief Inspector Jacques Clouseau enters a wig and makeup shop, where he is fitted for a prosthetic nose, wig, and false teeth by owner Professor Auguste Balls. Meanwhile, a television news anchor reports on the third theft of the Pink Panther, the world’s largest cut diamond owned by the Middle Eastern nation of Lugash. Chief Inspector Dreyfus meets with Commissioner Lasorde, who informs the detective that the Lugashian President Haleesh personally requested that Clouseau investigate the case. While smoking his pipe in his office, Clouseau sets his newspaper on fire and destroys the room struggling to extinguish the flames. Dreyfus attends a therapy session with a psychiatrist to discuss his renewed obsessive desire to kill Clouseau and end their long-standing rivalry. That night, Clouseau’s pursuer watches his apartment building as the bumbling inspector spills his groceries across the lobby floor. At the police station, Dreyfus’ assistant, Sergeant Francois Duval, informs his superior that Clouseau intends to travel to London, England, in search of Sir Charles Litton, also known as the “Phantom,” whom he once suspected of a previous Pink Panther theft. Although Clouseau seems unaware that Litton has moved to the South of France, the two officers decide not to inform him. On his way to the airport, Clouseau detonates his car engine while attempting to fix the dashboard cigarette lighter. Wrapped under bandages and a splinted leg, he notifies London’s New Scotland Yard that he will be arriving in England in “disguise,” and boards the airplane. While airborne, Clouseau struggles to use the lavatory and becomes trapped in an inverted position for much of the ... +


Unaware that he is being watched by members of the Mafia, French Sûreté Chief Inspector Jacques Clouseau enters a wig and makeup shop, where he is fitted for a prosthetic nose, wig, and false teeth by owner Professor Auguste Balls. Meanwhile, a television news anchor reports on the third theft of the Pink Panther, the world’s largest cut diamond owned by the Middle Eastern nation of Lugash. Chief Inspector Dreyfus meets with Commissioner Lasorde, who informs the detective that the Lugashian President Haleesh personally requested that Clouseau investigate the case. While smoking his pipe in his office, Clouseau sets his newspaper on fire and destroys the room struggling to extinguish the flames. Dreyfus attends a therapy session with a psychiatrist to discuss his renewed obsessive desire to kill Clouseau and end their long-standing rivalry. That night, Clouseau’s pursuer watches his apartment building as the bumbling inspector spills his groceries across the lobby floor. At the police station, Dreyfus’ assistant, Sergeant Francois Duval, informs his superior that Clouseau intends to travel to London, England, in search of Sir Charles Litton, also known as the “Phantom,” whom he once suspected of a previous Pink Panther theft. Although Clouseau seems unaware that Litton has moved to the South of France, the two officers decide not to inform him. On his way to the airport, Clouseau detonates his car engine while attempting to fix the dashboard cigarette lighter. Wrapped under bandages and a splinted leg, he notifies London’s New Scotland Yard that he will be arriving in England in “disguise,” and boards the airplane. While airborne, Clouseau struggles to use the lavatory and becomes trapped in an inverted position for much of the flight. Once the plane lands, Scotland Yard detectives Alec Drummond and Hugh McLaren struggle to identify Clouseau, but recognize the inspector when he tumbles down the jetway stairs. Meanwhile, Dreyfus dreams of living a life without Clouseau and swimming in a pool full of gelatin. Awakened by a telephone call from Drummond, he learns about a possible Libyan assassination attempt on Clouseau’s life, which the target has refused to take seriously, and Drummond urges him to send Clouseau back to Paris. While attempting to answer a telephone call in his hotel room, Clouseau is repeatedly knocked out the window by the bustling charwoman, and pulls the telephone wire out of the walls. Finally, Clouseau receives instructions from Dreyfus to go to Lugash, despite Drummond’s warning. Meanwhile, Lugashian Colonel Bufoni informs President Haleesh that various insurance companies have already paid the government $12 million for the Pink Panther’s theft, and resolves to protect the president’s reputation by stopping Clouseau’s arrival. During another therapy session, Dreyfus learns that Clouseau’s airplane has gone missing over the ocean. Later, while being interviewed by investigative television reporter Marie Jouvet, he struggles to mask his scathing dislike of Clouseau and glee over his presumed death. Marie also interviews Clouseau’s Chinese housekeeper, Cato, who helped train the detective for unexpected criminal attacks. She then finds Clouseau’s former assistant, Hercule Lajoy, aboard a river barge, and learns about the inspector’s unorthodox crime-solving methods. Lajoy encourages her to interview the criminals that Clouseau pursued and incarcerated. After watching Marie’s first television report about Clouseau’s disappearance, a Mafia boss named Bruno Langois meets with other organized crime leaders and decides to track Marie’s whereabouts to ensure that Clouseau is never found. Sir Charles Litton, and his wife, Lady Litton, previous owner of the Pink Panther, tell Marie about meeting Clouseau twenty years earlier while skiing in Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy: Clouseau and Lady Litton were married and later divorced before she remarried Charles and the inspector falsely accused him of stealing the jewel. Describing how the Pink Panther was actually taken by a man in a gorilla suit at a costume party, they reveal that Clouseau himself was mistaken for the criminal and subsequently arrested. Despite the detective’s mysterious disappearance, the Littons insist that he is still alive. After the meeting, Marie’s taxi driver is threatened into driving her to a secluded villa to meet Bruno, where she refuses the Mafia leader’s request to stop her investigations. Later, Dreyfus declines Marie’s demands to incriminate Bruno for her kidnapping, prompting her to accuse the police of sustaining corrupt ties to the Mafia. As a result, she begins developing a television exposé on the subject and breaks into Clouseau’s apartment while she believes Cato to be away on vacation. Cato springs from a secret hiding place to attack, but realizes who she is and tells her about Clouseau’s upbringing on a French vineyard. Marie then speaks with Clouseau’s ill and forgetful father, who now lives with his son’s former nurse and her energetic dog. Clouseau Senior recalls how his son became a policeman: After the love of his life married another man, Clouseau botched his own suicide and later joined the army in World War II, where his incompetence caused him to fumble the assassination of various important German officials. In Marie’s final report on the subject, she refuses to believe that Clouseau has died and suggests that he has gone into hiding. While swooping over a rocky beach somewhere in Europe, a seagull deposits droppings on the inspector’s familiar trench coat as he curses, “swine seagull!” +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.