Yes, Giorgio (1982)

PG | 113 mins | Romance | 1 October 1982

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HISTORY

       According to an article in the 31 Oct 1981 issue of Screen International, British producer Peter Fetterman began developing multiple features after moving from London, England, to Los Angeles, CA. His initial idea focused on Italian opera tenor Enrico Caruso, but the producer anticipated difficulties selling the project to investors. After recalling Anne Piper’s 1961 novel, Yes Giorgio, Fetterman decided to change the story to involve a “strong female role,” and received interest from opera singer Luciano Pavarotti, and his manager, Hebert H. Breslin, who is credited as an executive producer. After rejections from multiple studios, Fetterman met with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M-G-M) executive David Begelman, whose love of opera and encouragement from Pavarotti’s sudden popularity in the U.S., prompted him to approve the project. A 12 Jun 1980 DV article noted that Fetterman convinced Begelman to invest $7-8 million toward the film’s projected budget. Screen International noted that Fetterman then spent a month in Italy with Pavarotti and screenwriter Norman Steinberg during pre-production.
       On 5 Jun 1980, HR announced that Pavarotti had agreed to make his motion picture debut in the film, which would also mark M-G-M’s first new project since becoming a publicly-owned corporation. Although the studio did not expect to complete the script for another three to four months, principal photography was initially scheduled for May 1981, with a Jun 1982 release under United Artists. At this stage of preproduction, the story more closely resembled Piper’s novel: Pavarotti would portray an Italian opera professor who, while teaching a singing course in the U.S., meets an “indomitable” American woman.
       The 10 Dec 1980 HR stated that ... More Less

       According to an article in the 31 Oct 1981 issue of Screen International, British producer Peter Fetterman began developing multiple features after moving from London, England, to Los Angeles, CA. His initial idea focused on Italian opera tenor Enrico Caruso, but the producer anticipated difficulties selling the project to investors. After recalling Anne Piper’s 1961 novel, Yes Giorgio, Fetterman decided to change the story to involve a “strong female role,” and received interest from opera singer Luciano Pavarotti, and his manager, Hebert H. Breslin, who is credited as an executive producer. After rejections from multiple studios, Fetterman met with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M-G-M) executive David Begelman, whose love of opera and encouragement from Pavarotti’s sudden popularity in the U.S., prompted him to approve the project. A 12 Jun 1980 DV article noted that Fetterman convinced Begelman to invest $7-8 million toward the film’s projected budget. Screen International noted that Fetterman then spent a month in Italy with Pavarotti and screenwriter Norman Steinberg during pre-production.
       On 5 Jun 1980, HR announced that Pavarotti had agreed to make his motion picture debut in the film, which would also mark M-G-M’s first new project since becoming a publicly-owned corporation. Although the studio did not expect to complete the script for another three to four months, principal photography was initially scheduled for May 1981, with a Jun 1982 release under United Artists. At this stage of preproduction, the story more closely resembled Piper’s novel: Pavarotti would portray an Italian opera professor who, while teaching a singing course in the U.S., meets an “indomitable” American woman.
       The 10 Dec 1980 HR stated that Franklin J. Schaffner had joined the project as director. The item listed Stanley O’Toole as executive producer, while a 7 Apr 1981 Var brief also named Alain Bernheim Productions executive Faye M. Nuell in the same position, but neither are credited in the final film. As reported by the 26 Jun 1981 HR, actor Lou Cutell had been cast, but he is not listed among the onscreen credits.
       Although 28 Jan 1981 and 15 May 1981 HR briefs suggested that Lesley-Anne Down and Sigourney Weaver, respectively, were possibly considered for the role of “Pamela Taylor,” the 28 May 1981 DV confirmed the casting of Kate Jackson. A few days later, the 3 Jun 1981 DV reported that Jackson left the project after requesting script changes, with Angie Dickinson being named as her potential replacement. A 10 Jun 1981 DV news item announced that Kathryn Harrold was cast instead.
       The 24 Jun 1981 Var indicated that prior to the official start of production, Pavarotti’s 13 Jun 1981 benefit concert at the San Francisco, CA, Civic Auditorium was filmed for inclusion in the picture. An 18 Jun 1981 HR article noted that M-G-M paid $25,000 for the use of the San Francisco Opera orchestra, contributed $5,000 to the benefit, and decorated the venue. The 23 Jul 1981 DV stated that production used six cameras to film the event. According to the 17 Jun 1981 Var, Pavarotti was next scheduled to perform a free concert at Boston, MA’s Hatch Shell outdoor auditorium on 26 Jun 1981 alongside the Opera Company of Boston Orchestra and Miami Opera conductor Emerson Buckley, who first brought Pavarotti to the U.S. over ten years earlier. The show, however, was rescheduled for 27 Jun 1981, due to anticipated traffic delays caused by a Boston Red Sox baseball game taking place that same night. Prior to the performance, the Yes, Giorgio crew was expected to arrive in the city 20 Jun 1981, to film scenes at the Copley Plaza Hotel and Faneuil Hall until 1 Jul 1981. According to a 13 May 1981 LAHExam article, filmmakers hoped to complete production prior to the threatened 1 Jul 1981 Directors Guild of America (DGA) strike, since any delays could indefinitely suspend production, due to Pavarotti’s five-year concert commitment beginning in the fall of that year.
       Various contemporary sources, including 14 Aug 1981 HR production charts, confirmed that principal photography began in Boston on 22 Jun 1981. The 25 Jun 1981 HR reported that filming in the city had been extended until 7 Jul 1981. A 23 Jul 1981 DV article stated that the Metropolitan Opera in New York City approved plans for the production to film there in Aug 1981. However, the interiors for the Turandot opera performance would be shot on M-G-M’s Stage 27 in Culver City, CA, where filmmakers built a recreation of the Met stage. In addition, the crew built a kitchen set used for the food fight scene on the studio’s Stage 20.
       A 9 Sep 1981 M-G-M press release in AMPAS library files indicated that filming also took place in Napa Valley, CA, and Rome, Italy, before moving to the small village of Capodimonte, Italy, 9 Sep 1981, to complete principal photography. An earlier 26 Aug 1981 Var brief indicated that Pavarotti, Schaffner, and director of photography Fred J. Koenekamp were originally scheduled to arrive in Capodimonte on 4 Sep 1981, to begin their five-day shooting schedule on 7 Sep 1981. According to Screen International, production lasted a total of twelve weeks.
       A 12 Aug 1981 Var news item stated that Miriam Nelson choreographed a dance number for Pavarotti and Harrold, but she does not receive onscreen credit.
       The 6 Oct 1981 HR stated that the budget was estimated at $15 million, with an additional $10 million for a publicity campaign promoting a May 1982 U.S. release. The 8 Sep 1982 Var later listed the total production cost at $18 million.
       Nearly a year later, a 8 Sep 1982 Var brief announced that the world premiere AFI benefit screening was scheduled for 19 Sep 1982, at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. The 22 Sep 1982 HR noted that the New York City premiere took place that day at the Ziegfield Theatre. According to the 6 Oct 1982 Var, an additional fundraising premiere was held in Boston on 30 Sep 1982. The 3 Sep 1982 HR noted that Yes, Giorgio was expected to open 24 Sep 1982 in New York City, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., Toronto, Canada, and San Francisco, before expanding to national release 1 Oct 1982.
      Opening credits are preceded by the phrase: “This story is dedicated to lovers everywhere.” In end credits, “the Producers extend their thanks to: Massachusetts Film Commission—Mary Lou Crane; Metropolital Opera—Jane Hermann, Joe Clark; San Francisco Opera Orchestra—Kurt Adler; Alitalia Airlines; Baskin Robbins; Jewelry Supplied by Tiffany & Co.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
12 Jun 1980.
---
Daily Variety
28 May 1981.
---
Daily Variety
3 Jun 1981.
---
Daily Variety
10 Jun 1981.
---
Daily Variety
23 Jul 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jun 1980
p. 1, 21.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Dec 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jan 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 May 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jun 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jun 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jun 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Aug 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Aug 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Oct 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Sep 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Sep 1982
p. 3, 11.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Sep 1982.
---
LAHExam
13 May 1981.
---
Los Angeles Times
25 Sep 1982
p. 7.
New York Times
24 Sep 1982
p. 8.
Screen International
31 Oct 1981
p. 14.
Variety
7 Apr 1981.
---
Variety
17 Jun 1981.
---
Variety
24 Jun 1981.
---
Variety
12 Aug 1981.
---
Variety
26 Aug 1981.
---
Variety
8 Sep 1982.
---
Variety
15 Sep 1982
p. 12.
Variety
6 Oct 1982.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
From MGM/UA Entertainment Co.
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
Key 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
2d asst dir, In New York
Prod mgr, In Italy
1st asst dir, In Italy
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Asst cam
Still photog
Photog of Luciano Pavarotti by
Gaffer
Key grip
Dolly grip
Cam op, In New York
Asst cam, In New York
Gaffer, In New York
Key grip, In New York
Still photog, In New York
Cam op, In Italy
Gaffer, In Italy
ART DIRECTORS
Illustrator
Illustrator
Asst art dir, In Italy
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Outside prop master
Const coord
Const foreman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Kathryn Harrold's cost by
Key costumer
Men's costumer
Women's costumer
Women's costumer
Secy to Ms. Riggs
Cost maker
Ward supv, In Italy
MUSIC
Orig mus comp and cond by
Opera consultant
Mus coord
Cond, Opera seq and prerec
Mus consultant
SOUND
Sd rec mixer
Sd rec mixer
Sd rec mixer
Sd rec mixer
Boom man
Playback op
Concert mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Matte artist
Graphics des
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup des by
Makeup
Supv hairstylist
Hairstylist
Makeup, In New York
Hairdresser, In New York
PRODUCTION MISC
Loc consultant
Casting
Dial coach
Asst to Mr. Schaffner
Helicopter pilot
Prod auditor
Loc auditor
Loc auditor
Scr supv
Prod secy
Prod secy
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Prod coord, In New York
Loc mgr, In Italy
Casting, In Italy
STAND INS
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
COLOR PERSONNEL
[Col by]
SOURCES
LITERARY
Suggested by the novel Yes, Giorgio by Anne Piper (London, 1961).
AUTHOR
MUSIC
"Turandot," by Giacomo Puccini, by arrangement with G. Ricordi & C., S.p.a.
Operatic arias: "Una furtiva lagrima," from "L'Elisir D'Amore," Donizetti
"La donna e mobile," from "Rigoletto," Verdi
+
MUSIC
"Turandot," by Giacomo Puccini, by arrangement with G. Ricordi & C., S.p.a.
Operatic arias: "Una furtiva lagrima," from "L'Elisir D'Amore," Donizetti
"La donna e mobile," from "Rigoletto," Verdi
"Cielo e mar," from "La Gioconda," Ponchielli
"Donna non vidi mai," from "Manon Lescaut," Puccini
"Nessun dorma," from "Turandot," Puccini
Incidental music: "Ballet," from "Alda," Verdi
"Il viaggio a Reims," Rossini, "Comme Facette Mammeta," Capaldo and Gambardella.
+
SONGS
"If We Were In Love," lyrics by Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman, music by John Williams
Songs: "Ave Maria," Schubert
"O Sole Mio," Di Capua
+
SONGS
"If We Were In Love," lyrics by Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman, music by John Williams
Songs: "Ave Maria," Schubert
"O Sole Mio," Di Capua
"Santa Lucia," Traditional
"Mattinata," Leoncavallo
"I Left My Heart In San Francisco," lyrics Douglass Cross, music George Cory
"Funicull, Funicula," Denza.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 October 1982
Premiere Information:
Washington, D.C. premiere: 19 September 1982
New York premiere: 22 September 1982
Los Angeles and New York openings: 24 September 1982
Production Date:
22 June--early September 1981 in Boston, MA
San Francisco, CA
New York City
Culver City, CA
Rome, Italy
and Capodimonte, Italy
Copyright Claimant:
MGM/UA Entertainment Company
Copyright Date:
30 September 1982
Copyright Number:
PA150320
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo in Selected Theatres
Lenses
Panaflex® Camera and Lenses by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
113
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Languages:
Italian, English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

xIn the Italian countryside, world-famous opera tenor Giorgio Fini performs at his friend’s wedding ceremony. Afterward, a crowd gathers to see the singer as he drives through the village on his way to the airport. Upon arriving in the U.S. to rehearse for an upcoming concert, Giorgio receives a telephone call requesting that he sing at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City. Still traumatized by a terrible performance there seven years earlier, he vehemently refuses. When the rehearsal continues, Giorgio suddenly loses his voice. Although he declines treatment from a throat specialist named Dr. Pamela Taylor, his manager, Henry Pollack, warns him that the damage may become permanent. Upon inspection, Pamela determines that Giorgio’s dysphonia was mentally triggered by the memories of his failure at the Met. She invents a diagnosis and injects him with a placebo in order to trick him into believing he has been cured. While working at a hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, Pamela prepares a child patient for a tonsillectomy when Giorgio unexpectedly arrives to thank her for her treatment. Unable to believe that she does not enjoy opera, he invites her to his next concert and promises to sing just for her. At the performance the following day, Pamela is moved by Giorgio’s voice and joins his many fans in their enthusiastic applause. Afterward, he invites Pamela to an expensive private dinner, but she remains unimpressed by his extravagant lifestyle, and leaves midway through the meal. Before continuing his tour in San Francisco, California, Giorgio visits the hospital to treat Pamela’s tonsillectomy patients to a gigantic tub of ice cream and invite the doctor to accompany him to California. Calling him presumptuous and ... +


xIn the Italian countryside, world-famous opera tenor Giorgio Fini performs at his friend’s wedding ceremony. Afterward, a crowd gathers to see the singer as he drives through the village on his way to the airport. Upon arriving in the U.S. to rehearse for an upcoming concert, Giorgio receives a telephone call requesting that he sing at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City. Still traumatized by a terrible performance there seven years earlier, he vehemently refuses. When the rehearsal continues, Giorgio suddenly loses his voice. Although he declines treatment from a throat specialist named Dr. Pamela Taylor, his manager, Henry Pollack, warns him that the damage may become permanent. Upon inspection, Pamela determines that Giorgio’s dysphonia was mentally triggered by the memories of his failure at the Met. She invents a diagnosis and injects him with a placebo in order to trick him into believing he has been cured. While working at a hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, Pamela prepares a child patient for a tonsillectomy when Giorgio unexpectedly arrives to thank her for her treatment. Unable to believe that she does not enjoy opera, he invites her to his next concert and promises to sing just for her. At the performance the following day, Pamela is moved by Giorgio’s voice and joins his many fans in their enthusiastic applause. Afterward, he invites Pamela to an expensive private dinner, but she remains unimpressed by his extravagant lifestyle, and leaves midway through the meal. Before continuing his tour in San Francisco, California, Giorgio visits the hospital to treat Pamela’s tonsillectomy patients to a gigantic tub of ice cream and invite the doctor to accompany him to California. Calling him presumptuous and arrogant, she reminds him that he is already married and tears up the airplane ticket. A few days later, however, she sees Giorgio performing on television and realizes that she has feelings for him. In San Francisco, Giorgio loses his voice again while singing for a dinner party. Pamela appears in the crowd and leads him offstage for treatment, revealing that she took an early vacation to drive cross-country to meet him. Together they travel to a secluded, Italian-style estate belonging to his friends, Kwan and Mei Ling, who spend their days serving Giorgio’s frequent and excessive demands. Once Giorgio and Pamela make love, Giorgio forces her to promise not to fall in love with him. He then takes her and Henry on a hot air balloon ride to a small house in the wine country, owned by the Giordano family. He introduces Pamela as Henry’s niece, and they play tennis and bocce. When Giorgio loses the games, he yells at Pamela for emasculating him and insists that she be more subservient. Although this angers her, Pamela gazes affectionately at Giorgio as he sings at the Giordano’s’ party that evening. Back at the estate in San Francisco, Pamela is humiliated when she answers a telephone call from Giorgio’s wife in Italy. Later, Henry asks her to convince Giorgio to step in as a replacement tenor in the Met’s performance of Giacomo Puccini’s opera, Turandot. She initially refuses, but later suggests the idea one evening while cooking dinner. When he becomes irate, Pamela lightens the mood by initiating a playful food fight and revealing that his dysphonia was never caused by physical illness. Gathering his confidence, he finally agrees to sing at the Met, and Pamela accompanies him to rehearsal in New York City. As the performance nears, Giorgio happily telephones his wife to tell her about the news, causing Pamela to realize that she will never be more than his mistress. When she admits that she loves Giorgio, the singer becomes upset with her for breaking her promise, and she ends their affair by returning home to Boston. During dress rehearsal for Turandot, a mechanical set piece malfunctions, rousing Giorgio’s superstitious fears and prompting him to flee. He finds Pamela at the hospital and confesses his passionate love for her, but still refuses to leave his wife. She attends his opening night performance and, during the final song, blows him a kiss before walking out of the theater. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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