Full page view
HISTORY

       A 7 Mar 1984 Var brief announced a title change from Breakdance to Break Dancin.’ DV production charts on 23 Mar 1984 listed the film under the title Breakin.’
       A 3 Jan 1984 DV news brief announced David Wheeler as director. However, the 9 May 1984 Var review noted that Joel Silberg had replaced Wheeler.
       A 13 Jun 1984 Var article reported the film had a $2 million budget and 10 Feb 1984 DV production charts stated principal photography began 6 Feb 1984 in Phoenix, AZ. Other locations, in Los Angeles, CA, included Venice Beach, the Shrine Auditorium, and the Palace in Hollywood. Jean-Claude Van Damme appears as a background actor in a scene at Venice Beach.
       A 10 Dec 1985 DV news article reported that producers David Zito and Allen DeBevoise sued Cannon Films, Inc., claiming they did not receive the 5% of net profits to which they were entitled, and alleging Cannon “improperly tried to revise their contract’s definition and net profits.”
       The film was followed by a sequel, Breakin’ 2 Electric Boogaloo (1984, see entry), released nine months later.
      The film concludes with the voiceover statement: “This story’s through, but wait for part two.” End credits include the following statements: “And Coming soon! Electric Boogaloo, the dance sensation of tomorrow!” and, “Special thanks to: Nike, Inc., Carushka Bodywear, Norm Marshall & Associates, AFP, Alta Marea, E.A.F.A. ‘80, Los Angeles Ballet Center, Debbie Reynolds’ Dance Studio.” ... More Less

       A 7 Mar 1984 Var brief announced a title change from Breakdance to Break Dancin.’ DV production charts on 23 Mar 1984 listed the film under the title Breakin.’
       A 3 Jan 1984 DV news brief announced David Wheeler as director. However, the 9 May 1984 Var review noted that Joel Silberg had replaced Wheeler.
       A 13 Jun 1984 Var article reported the film had a $2 million budget and 10 Feb 1984 DV production charts stated principal photography began 6 Feb 1984 in Phoenix, AZ. Other locations, in Los Angeles, CA, included Venice Beach, the Shrine Auditorium, and the Palace in Hollywood. Jean-Claude Van Damme appears as a background actor in a scene at Venice Beach.
       A 10 Dec 1985 DV news article reported that producers David Zito and Allen DeBevoise sued Cannon Films, Inc., claiming they did not receive the 5% of net profits to which they were entitled, and alleging Cannon “improperly tried to revise their contract’s definition and net profits.”
       The film was followed by a sequel, Breakin’ 2 Electric Boogaloo (1984, see entry), released nine months later.
      The film concludes with the voiceover statement: “This story’s through, but wait for part two.” End credits include the following statements: “And Coming soon! Electric Boogaloo, the dance sensation of tomorrow!” and, “Special thanks to: Nike, Inc., Carushka Bodywear, Norm Marshall & Associates, AFP, Alta Marea, E.A.F.A. ‘80, Los Angeles Ballet Center, Debbie Reynolds’ Dance Studio.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
3 Jan 1984.
---
Daily Variety
23 Mar 1984.
---
Daily Variety
10 Dec 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 May 1984
p. 4.
LAHExam
5 May 1984.
---
Los Angeles Times
7 May 1984
p. 6.
Motion Picture Production Digestion Picture Production Digestt
23 May 1984.
---
New York Times
5 May 1984
p. 17.
Variety
7 Mar 1984.
---
Variety
9 May 1984
p. 526.
Variety
13 Jun 1984.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Featured street dancers:
Additional street dancers, The "Dominoes"
Additional street dancers, The "Little Dominoes"
Additional street dancers, The "Breakazoids"
[and]
Graffiti artists:
Featured jazz dancers:
Additional jazz dancers:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
The Cannon Group Inc presents
A Golan-Globus production
A Cannon Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Addl cam op
Addl cam op
Addl cam op
Gaffer
Rigging gaffer
Best boy
Key grip
Best boy
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Still photog
Lightflex System by
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Supv ed
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst props
Leadman
Const supv
Carpenter
Carpenter
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus score
Mus supv
Supv mus ed
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Asst mus ed
Mus coord
Mus liaison
Score eng
Russian Hill Recording
Score synthesis
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Supv sd ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
ADR ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Main titles by
Artist
DANCE
Mus numbers staged and choreog
Asst to the choreog
Asst to the choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup supv/Hair stylist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Prod coord
Loc mgr
Voice casting
Asst to Russ Regan
Asst to the dir
Teacher/Child labor representative
Pub coord
National pub reprentative
Prod accountant
Extra casting
Craft service
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Prod equip and facilities supplied bu
Promotional products by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Jazz Class," written by Gary Remal and Michael Boyd
"Franco's Tango," written by Gary Remal and Michael Boyd
"Garage Dance," written by Gary Remal and Michael Boyd
+
MUSIC
"Jazz Class," written by Gary Remal and Michael Boyd
"Franco's Tango," written by Gary Remal and Michael Boyd
"Garage Dance," written by Gary Remal and Michael Boyd
"Kelly's Song" (Love theme from Breakin'), written by Gary Remal and Michael Boyd
"Baroque In Blue," from Claude Bolling's Suite for Flute and Jazz Piano.
+
SONGS
"Tibetan Jam," written by Chris "The Glove" Taylor, rap by Ice T, produced by Chris "The Glove" Taylor
"Lil' Lockers," written and performed by Matthew Ender, Steven Elowe, and Doug Lunn, produced by Matthew Ender, recorded at Pacifica Studios
"Tour De France," performed by Kraftwerk
+
SONGS
"Tibetan Jam," written by Chris "The Glove" Taylor, rap by Ice T, produced by Chris "The Glove" Taylor
"Lil' Lockers," written and performed by Matthew Ender, Steven Elowe, and Doug Lunn, produced by Matthew Ender, recorded at Pacifica Studios
"Tour De France," performed by Kraftwerk
courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc. and EMI by arrangement with Warner Special Products and EMI
"Boogie Down," performed by Al Jarreau, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc. and WEA International Inc. by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Beat Box," performed by Art of Noise, courtesy of Z.T.T. and Island Records
"Breakin' … There's No Stoppin' Us," written by Ollie E. Brown and Jerry Knight, performed by Ollie & Jerry, produced by Ollie E. Brown for Brown Sugar Prod.
"Freakshow On The Dance Floor," written by the Bar-Kays and Allen A. Jones, performed by the Bar-Kays, produced by Allen A. Jones, courtesy of Mercury/PolyGram Records
"Showdown," written by Ollie E. Brown and Joe Curiale, performed by Ollie & Jerry
produced by Ollie E. Brown for Brown Sugar Prod.
"Body Work," written by Curtis Hudson, performed by Hot Streak, produced by Curtis Hudson and Lisa Stevens, co-produced by John "Jellybean" Benitez, courtesy of Easy Street Records
"99 1/2," written by John Footman and Maxi Anderson, performed by Carol Lynn Townes, produced and mixed by Rod Hui for Rodway Productions
"Street People," written by Ollie E. Brown and Jerry Knight, performed by Fire Fox, produced by Ollie E. Brown for Brown Sugar Prod.
"Heart Of The Beat," written by Dan Hartman and Charlie Midnight, performed by 3V, produced by Dan Hartman, remix by John "Jellybean" Benitez
"Cut It," written by Paul Fishman, performed by Re-Flex, produced by Re-Flex, courtesy of Capitol/EMI Records
"Ain't Nobody," written by Hawk Worlinski, performed by Rufus with Chaka Khan, produced by Russ Titleman, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc. by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Reckless," written by Chris "The Glove" Taylor, rap by Ice T, produced by Chris "The Glove" Taylor.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Breakdance
Break Dancin'
Release Date:
4 May 1984
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 4 May 1984
Production Date:
began 6 February 1984 in Phoenix, AZ, and Los Angeles, CA
Copyright Claimant:
Cannon Productions, N. V.
Copyright Date:
28 June 1984
Copyright Number:
PA221559
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo in selected theatres
Color
Lenses
Arriflex cameras supplied by Cine Video, Hollywood, California
Duration(in mins):
83
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Los Angeles, California, jazz dancer Kelly works as a waitress while taking classes with a demanding teacher, Franco. Her friend, Vicky, fears Kelly is stuck in her career and gives her the business card of a talent agent named James. After class, Franco offers Kelly extra help, but she is suspicious of his intentions and declines. Kelly instead gives her friend Adam a ride to Venice Beach, where they join a crowd watching Adam’s friends, “Ozone” and “Turbo,” break dancing. Ozone teaches Kelly dance moves and gives her a street name, “Special K.” The crowd breaks up when a rival dance group, Electro Rock, arrives. Later, Ozone and Turbo visit Kelly at Franco’s Dance Academy. They demonstrate their street moves to the class, but Franco is unimpressed and asks them to leave. Kelly apologizes to Franco and he warns her to stay away from the breakdancers. While introducing Kelly to the music for an upcoming show he is choreographing, Franco kisses her passionately, but she objects and flees the studio. That night, the Electro Rock dancers challenge Ozone and Turbo to a dance-off. Ozone does not think Electro Rock is a worthy opponent, but Turbo convinces him that they have been disrespected and must assert their superior skills. A few days later, Adam asks Kelly why she has not been attending Franco’s class and she replies that she is busy working double-shifts at the restaurant. She meets with the agent, James, who promises to send her on auditions. However, the auditions do not go well and Kelly grows discouraged, believing she needs a change. Adam invites her to a club called Radiotron where they watch Ozone and Turbo out-dance ... +


Los Angeles, California, jazz dancer Kelly works as a waitress while taking classes with a demanding teacher, Franco. Her friend, Vicky, fears Kelly is stuck in her career and gives her the business card of a talent agent named James. After class, Franco offers Kelly extra help, but she is suspicious of his intentions and declines. Kelly instead gives her friend Adam a ride to Venice Beach, where they join a crowd watching Adam’s friends, “Ozone” and “Turbo,” break dancing. Ozone teaches Kelly dance moves and gives her a street name, “Special K.” The crowd breaks up when a rival dance group, Electro Rock, arrives. Later, Ozone and Turbo visit Kelly at Franco’s Dance Academy. They demonstrate their street moves to the class, but Franco is unimpressed and asks them to leave. Kelly apologizes to Franco and he warns her to stay away from the breakdancers. While introducing Kelly to the music for an upcoming show he is choreographing, Franco kisses her passionately, but she objects and flees the studio. That night, the Electro Rock dancers challenge Ozone and Turbo to a dance-off. Ozone does not think Electro Rock is a worthy opponent, but Turbo convinces him that they have been disrespected and must assert their superior skills. A few days later, Adam asks Kelly why she has not been attending Franco’s class and she replies that she is busy working double-shifts at the restaurant. She meets with the agent, James, who promises to send her on auditions. However, the auditions do not go well and Kelly grows discouraged, believing she needs a change. Adam invites her to a club called Radiotron where they watch Ozone and Turbo out-dance Electro Rock, until the group unleashes their secret weapon, a female dancer. The crowd’s favor shifts to Electro Rock and Ozone and Turbo leave the club, defeated. The next day, Adam and Kelly visit Ozone and Turbo at the garage, where they live and work on their dance moves. Kelly compliments them on their performance, dismissing the female dancer as a gimmick. Ozone insists that the girl was good, but Kelly declares that she is better. Adam suggests that Ozone and Turbo incorporate Kelly into their act, and offers to act as their manager. Turbo is reluctant, but Ozone begins teaching Kelly to break dance. Kelly learns quickly, wins over Turbo, and the foursome celebrate at lunch. At the restaurant, a group of country music fans mock them and Turbo maneuvers them into a fight. Later, Ozone hopes for a romance with Kelly, but she keeps the relationship professional. The following day, James dismisses Kelly’s street dancing, but she convinces him watch her dance with Ozone and Turbo at Radiotron in a rematch with Electro Rock. At the club, Kelly, Ozone, and Turbo win the dance-off, and James is impressed. However, Ozone’s feelings are hurt when Kelly chooses to leave with James rather than stay and celebrate. The next day, Kelly tells Ozone about a major production for which James wants the group to audition, but Ozone rejects help from the agent. Later, James throws a lavish party to introduce the trio to important people in the dance community. Franco insults Ozone, who in turn attacks him, then leaves the party with Turbo. Kelly confronts Franco, and James asks him to leave as well. A few days later, Kelly finds Ozone sulking at the beach and they argue because he does not want to participate in the audition. To make his point, Ozone shows her some street dancers who perform without ambition or pretension. Meanwhile, James books the trio rehearsal time in a dance studio, works to get them the audition, and gives them jackets emblazoned with “T.K.O. Crew.” When he meets resistance from the dance establishment, James dresses Kelly, Ozone, and Turbo in top hats and tails, and introduces them at the audition as the “Allegro Vivachi Dance Trio.” Franco spots them and alerts the judges, who forbid them from dancing because they are only looking for jazz dancers. Defying the head judge, Ozone tears the sleeves off his jacket and shirt and begins to dance. Kelly and Turbo join him and the judges give them a standing ovation. Franco withdraws his group from the competition and storms away. Sometime later, the production opens and the marquee reads “Turbo, Special K, Ozone in Street Jazz. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.