City Heat (1984)

PG | 97 mins | Comedy | 7 December 1984

Director:

Richard Benjamin

Producer:

Fritz Manes

Cinematographer:

Nick McLean

Production Designer:

Edward Carfagno

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures
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HISTORY

An undated cover page to City Heat’s shooting script in the AMPAS library production files used the working title, And All That Jazz. A 21 Nov 1983 HR news item referred to the film by its working title, Kansas City Jazz, and a 17 Feb 1984 DV brief announced a title change from Kansas City Blues to City Heat.
       A 21 Nov 1983 DV article reported that filmmaker Blake Edwards would begin production 20 Feb 1984. However, on 8 Feb 1984, DV reported that Edwards had left the project. Edwards was also scheduled to produce with Tony Adams, and Jonathan D. Krane as executive producer, but Fritz Manes is the sole producer credited onscreen. An 8 Feb 1984 LAT article stated that Warner Bros. cited “creative differences” for Edwards’ departure. However, a 7 May 1984 DV brief noted the director had conflicts with star Clint Eastwood. A 22 Feb 1984 LAT news item announced that Richard Benjamin would take over as director. Edwards’ only onscreen credit was for story and screenplay under the pseudonym Sam O. Brown, a reference to his earlier film, S.O.B. (1981, see entry). Joseph C. Stinson also received a screenplay credit, and a 7 May 1984 DV news item reported that he changed ninety-five percent of the dialogue.
       A 2 Apr 1984 DV brief announced actress Jane Alexander had replaced Marsha Mason in the role of “Addy,” and an 8 Jun 1984 LAHExam article stated that Madeline Kahn replaced Clio Goldsmith as “Caroline ... More Less

An undated cover page to City Heat’s shooting script in the AMPAS library production files used the working title, And All That Jazz. A 21 Nov 1983 HR news item referred to the film by its working title, Kansas City Jazz, and a 17 Feb 1984 DV brief announced a title change from Kansas City Blues to City Heat.
       A 21 Nov 1983 DV article reported that filmmaker Blake Edwards would begin production 20 Feb 1984. However, on 8 Feb 1984, DV reported that Edwards had left the project. Edwards was also scheduled to produce with Tony Adams, and Jonathan D. Krane as executive producer, but Fritz Manes is the sole producer credited onscreen. An 8 Feb 1984 LAT article stated that Warner Bros. cited “creative differences” for Edwards’ departure. However, a 7 May 1984 DV brief noted the director had conflicts with star Clint Eastwood. A 22 Feb 1984 LAT news item announced that Richard Benjamin would take over as director. Edwards’ only onscreen credit was for story and screenplay under the pseudonym Sam O. Brown, a reference to his earlier film, S.O.B. (1981, see entry). Joseph C. Stinson also received a screenplay credit, and a 7 May 1984 DV news item reported that he changed ninety-five percent of the dialogue.
       A 2 Apr 1984 DV brief announced actress Jane Alexander had replaced Marsha Mason in the role of “Addy,” and an 8 Jun 1984 LAHExam article stated that Madeline Kahn replaced Clio Goldsmith as “Caroline Howley.”
       HR production charts on 17 Apr 1984 noted that principal photography began 9 Apr 1984 in Los Angeles, CA. According to the 16 Mar 1984 DV, locations included the Variety Arts building and Main Street Gym in downtown Los Angeles, and Laird Studios in Culver City, CA. A 15 May 1984 DV news item reported actor Burt Reynolds incurred a hairline fracture of the jaw while shooting a fight scene. On 31 May 1984, DV stated Reynolds suffered dizziness from inner ear problems resulting from his injury, forcing production to shoot without the star for a week.
       The 7 Dec 1984 NYT review called the film “overdressed and overplotted,” but it benefited “greatly from the sardonic teamwork of Clint Eastwood and Burt Reynolds.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Feb 1985.
---
Daily Variety
21 Nov 1983.
---
Daily Variety
8 Feb 1984.
---
Daily Variety
17 Feb 1984.
---
Daily Variety
16 Mar 1984.
---
Daily Variety
2 Apr 1984.
---
Daily Variety
7 May 1984.
---
Daily Variety
15 May 1984.
---
Daily Variety
31 May 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Nov 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Apr 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Dec 1984
p. 3, 34.
LAHExam
8 Jun 1984.
---
LAHExam
7 Dec 1984.
---
Los Angeles Times
8 Feb 1984.
---
Los Angeles Times
22 Feb 1984.
---
Los Angeles Times
25 Nov 1984.
---
Los Angeles Times
7 Dec 1984
p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
9 Dec 1984.
---
Motion Picture Production Digest
14 Dec 1984.
---
New York Times
7 Dec 1984
p. 4.
Newsweek
10 Dec 1984.
---
Time
10 Dec 1984.
---
Variety
5 Dec 1984
p. 17.
WSJ
6 Dec 1984.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Malpaso/Deliverance production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam asst
Panaglide op
Panaglide op
Still photog
Key grip
2d grip
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Gaffer
Best boy
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Const coord
Prop master
Leadman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men`s ward
Women's ward
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus coord
SOUND
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Asst sd ed
Sd mixer
Boom man
Cable man
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles and opt
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Asst to prod
Prod secy
Auditor
Asst to Mr. Benjamin
Loc mgr
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Catering
Animal handler
Animal handler
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
[Col by]
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Montage Blues," music by Lennie Niehaus, pianists: Mike Lang, Pete Jolly, and Clint Eastwood.
SONGS
"City Heat," music and lyrics by Irene Cara and Bruce Roberts, sung by Joe Williams
"Million Dollar Baby," music and lyrics by Billy Rose, Mort Dixon, and Harry Warren, sung by Al Jarreau
"Between The Devil And The Deep Blue Sea," music and lyrics by Ted Koehler and Harold Arlen, sung by Eloise Laws
+
SONGS
"City Heat," music and lyrics by Irene Cara and Bruce Roberts, sung by Joe Williams
"Million Dollar Baby," music and lyrics by Billy Rose, Mort Dixon, and Harry Warren, sung by Al Jarreau
"Between The Devil And The Deep Blue Sea," music and lyrics by Ted Koehler and Harold Arlen, sung by Eloise Laws
"Embraceable You," music and lyrics by George and Ira Gershwin, sung by Irene Cara
"Let's Do It," music and lyrics by Cole Porter, sung by Rudy Vallee
"Get Happy," music and lyrics by Ted Koehler and Harold Arlen, sung by Irene Cara.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
And All That Jazz
Kansas City Jazz
Kansas City Blues
Release Date:
7 December 1984
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 7 December 1984
Production Date:
began 9 April 1984 in Los Angeles, CA
and Culver City, CA
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 March 1985
Copyright Number:
PA241500
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex Cameras by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
97
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27552
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1933 Kansas City, Missouri, police Lt. Speer stops at a coffee shop. There, a repossession man looks for private eye Mike Murphy, Speer’s former partner. A short time later, Murphy arrives, followed by a second repossession man, and the two henchmen attack Murphy. Speer intervenes only after someone spills his coffee. The next day, Murphy and his secretary, Addy, lament the agency’s shortage of funds, when Murphy’s partner, Dehl Swift, arrives with enough cash to pay the bills and a month’s salary owed to Addy, plus a bonus. Swift claims he won the money betting on horse races, but Murphy is dubious. When Swift leaves, Addy gives her bonus to Murphy to make his car payment, and he kisses her passionately. Later, Swift goes to Fat Freddie’s nightclub where his girl friend, Ginny Lee, sings. Collecting a briefcase containing accounting ledgers from Aram Strossell, the bookkeeper of gangster Leon Coll, Swift plans to sell the information to Coll’s rival, Primo Pitt. Meanwhile, Murphy receives a telephone call from socialite Caroline Howley, inviting him to an upcoming party. Lt. Spear takes Addy on a date to a boxing match, which Swift, Coll, and Pitt, also attend. After the fight, Leon Coll and his henchmen accost Swift, who offers to return the briefcase for $50,000. Speer and Addy secretly follow Swift home. There, Swift encounters Pitt and two of his men, who demand the briefcase. Swift is shot, and when Pitt finds the briefcase empty, he throws Swift’s body out the window. Speer engages in a shootout with Pitt’s men, killing one of them. At the coroner’s office, Speer explains Swift’s death to Murphy. Later, Coll interrogates Murphy to see ... +


In 1933 Kansas City, Missouri, police Lt. Speer stops at a coffee shop. There, a repossession man looks for private eye Mike Murphy, Speer’s former partner. A short time later, Murphy arrives, followed by a second repossession man, and the two henchmen attack Murphy. Speer intervenes only after someone spills his coffee. The next day, Murphy and his secretary, Addy, lament the agency’s shortage of funds, when Murphy’s partner, Dehl Swift, arrives with enough cash to pay the bills and a month’s salary owed to Addy, plus a bonus. Swift claims he won the money betting on horse races, but Murphy is dubious. When Swift leaves, Addy gives her bonus to Murphy to make his car payment, and he kisses her passionately. Later, Swift goes to Fat Freddie’s nightclub where his girl friend, Ginny Lee, sings. Collecting a briefcase containing accounting ledgers from Aram Strossell, the bookkeeper of gangster Leon Coll, Swift plans to sell the information to Coll’s rival, Primo Pitt. Meanwhile, Murphy receives a telephone call from socialite Caroline Howley, inviting him to an upcoming party. Lt. Spear takes Addy on a date to a boxing match, which Swift, Coll, and Pitt, also attend. After the fight, Leon Coll and his henchmen accost Swift, who offers to return the briefcase for $50,000. Speer and Addy secretly follow Swift home. There, Swift encounters Pitt and two of his men, who demand the briefcase. Swift is shot, and when Pitt finds the briefcase empty, he throws Swift’s body out the window. Speer engages in a shootout with Pitt’s men, killing one of them. At the coroner’s office, Speer explains Swift’s death to Murphy. Later, Coll interrogates Murphy to see if he is in on the deal with Pitt. Following Swift’s funeral, Murphy returns to his apartment to find it ransacked, and Speer waiting for him. Speer reports that Coll’s bookkeeper, Aram Strossell, was found dead in the river, and suspects a connection to Swift’s death. Speer scares off a couple of Pitt’s men, who were tailing Murphy, while Murphy goes to Caroline’s party and they make love. Speer visits Pitt and procures a bullet from the gangster’s nine-millimeter handgun, hoping to match it to the one that killed Swift. The following day, a letter that Swift addressed to himself arrives at Murphy’s detective agency office containing a pawnshop claim check. Pitt and his henchman arrive and the gangster informs Murphy that Swift double-crossed him and he wants the contents of the briefcase in exchange for Caroline, whom he has kidnapped. Later, Addy collects a box from the pawnshop, and it contains a Croix de Guerre French military decoration and another key. Speer reports that the bullet from Pitt’s gun matches the one that killed Swift, but he needs an eyewitness, Ginny Lee, to make an arrest. Ginny Lee calls Murphy and asks him to meet her in a park. Speer apologizes to Addy that their date ended badly, and she questions whether he is romantically interested in her. Ginny Lee fails to meet Murphy at the park, but he finds a ticket to the Roxy Theatre on his windshield. Speer and Pitt’s men follow Murphy to the theatre, where he finds Ginny Lee. She says she is scared of Pitt, and Murphy urges her to call Speer. Murphy asks if Swift talked about changes in his routine and Ginny Lee mentions that he had been playing a lot of handball near his home. Outside, Murphy learns of a gymnasium in Swift’s neighborhood from a fledgling police officer. Speer follows Murphy, as Ginny Lee is pursued by Pitt’s men and struck by a car. At the gymnasium, Murphy uses the key from the pawnshop to open Swift’s locker and finds a package. He returns home, shows Addy the accounting books, and she informs him that Ginny Lee is in the hospital. Pitt telephones Murphy at his office, and the detective assures him that he has Coll’s records. Outside, Murphy is caught in a shootout between Pitt’s men and Coll’s men, but Speer arrives and intervenes. Speer chastises his former partner for not alerting him when he found Ginny Lee, and follows Murphy to Pitt’s headquarters. Murphy wires the briefcase holding Coll’s ledgers with explosives, but before an exchange can be made, a gun battle breaks out. Speer shoots Pitt, and he and Murphy learn that Caroline is being held at a brothel. Meanwhile, Coll’s men kidnap Addy. Speer and Murphy infiltrate the brothel to rescue Caroline. Outside, Coll demands the briefcase with his accounting records in exchange for Addy. Speer reluctantly agrees, but as Coll drives away with the briefcase, his car explodes. Later, Murphy and Caroline, and Speer and Addy, go to Fat Freddie’s nightclub to see Ginny Lee perform. Murphy suggests that he and Speer make a good team, but his former partner insults him, and the two men step outside to fight. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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