The Hotel New Hampshire (1984)

R | 108 mins | Comedy-drama | 9 March 1984

Director:

Tony Richardson

Writer:

Tony Richardson

Producer:

Neil Hartley

Cinematographer:

David Watkin

Production Designer:

Jocelyn Herbert

Production Company:

Woodfall, Ltd.
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HISTORY

The film opens and ends with voice-over narration by Rob Lowe, as his character “John.” The last line, “There’s only one thing you can do: keep passing the open windows,” refers to a parable in the film about perseverance.
       End credits include the following statements: “Filmed in the province of Québec, Canada and at the Hotel Tadoussac in association with Filmline Productions, producers Pieter Kroonenburg & David Patterson and the Producers’ Circle,” and, “ Still photographs from the motion pictures This Gun for Hire (Paramount, 1942) and The Great Gatsby (Paramount, 1949), courtesy of Universal Pictures.”
       An 11 Mar 1982 HR news brief announced that filmmaker Tony Richardson planned to produce two films simultaneously from John Irving’s novel The Hotel New Hampshire, with the intention of casting actor Timothy Hutton as “John” in both pictures. A 6 May 1982 HR news item reported Richardson’s decision to make just one film from the novel. According to a 29 Jul 1982 HR brief, the film’s financiers, “the Pizza Hut people,” had withdrawn from the project. A 27 Oct 1982 Var article announced that Richardson had found new financing through “a combination of foreign sales advances from J & M Film Sales, Ltd., private British investors, and a deal underway with Orion Pictures for domestic distribution.” A 4 Mar 1984 LAT article reported that financing fell through three times in the two weeks prior to filming. A team of lawyers from Australia, London, England, New York City, and Los Angeles, CA, finally worked out the details. A 22 Jan 1983 Screen International ... More Less

The film opens and ends with voice-over narration by Rob Lowe, as his character “John.” The last line, “There’s only one thing you can do: keep passing the open windows,” refers to a parable in the film about perseverance.
       End credits include the following statements: “Filmed in the province of Québec, Canada and at the Hotel Tadoussac in association with Filmline Productions, producers Pieter Kroonenburg & David Patterson and the Producers’ Circle,” and, “ Still photographs from the motion pictures This Gun for Hire (Paramount, 1942) and The Great Gatsby (Paramount, 1949), courtesy of Universal Pictures.”
       An 11 Mar 1982 HR news brief announced that filmmaker Tony Richardson planned to produce two films simultaneously from John Irving’s novel The Hotel New Hampshire, with the intention of casting actor Timothy Hutton as “John” in both pictures. A 6 May 1982 HR news item reported Richardson’s decision to make just one film from the novel. According to a 29 Jul 1982 HR brief, the film’s financiers, “the Pizza Hut people,” had withdrawn from the project. A 27 Oct 1982 Var article announced that Richardson had found new financing through “a combination of foreign sales advances from J & M Film Sales, Ltd., private British investors, and a deal underway with Orion Pictures for domestic distribution.” A 4 Mar 1984 LAT article reported that financing fell through three times in the two weeks prior to filming. A team of lawyers from Australia, London, England, New York City, and Los Angeles, CA, finally worked out the details. A 22 Jan 1983 Screen International article stated that Marty Feldman had been cast, but the actor died in Dec 1982, prior to the start of filming.
       A 13 May 1983 HR article reported that principal photography began 2 May 1983, and was scheduled to continue for eight weeks in Montréal, and Tadoussac, a resort on the St. Lawrence River, Canada. A 4 May 1983 Var article cited a $5.5 million budget. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
11 Mar 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Apr 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 May 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 May 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jul 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Mar 1984
p. 4, 45.
Los Angeles Times
4 Mar 1984.
---
Los Angeles Times
9 Mar 1984
p. 1.
New York Times
9 Mar 1984
p. 8.
Screen International
22 Jan 1983.
---
Variety
27 Oct 1982.
---
Variety
4 May 1983.
---
Variety
14 Mar 1984
p. 20, 22.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Featuring:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
An Orion Pictures release
A Woodfall film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Unit mgr
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam
2d asst cam
2d cam op
Asst 2d cam
Asst 2d cam
Asst 2d cam
Asst 2d cam
Best boy
Key grip
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept asst
Art dept asst
Art dept asst
Art dept asst
Art dept asst
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Const coord
Const supv
Prop master
Prop buyer
Prop buyer
Chief carpenter
Carpenter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Cost coord
Ward master
Ward mistress
Ms. Kinski's bear cost
MUSIC
Arr and cond
Mus ed
Rec at
Wembley, London
Rec eng
SOUND
Boom woman
Cablewoman
Sd re-rec
Sd re-rec
Sd re-rec
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
ADR supv
ADR supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
Opticals
L.A.
MAKEUP
Makeup
Makeup asst
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Addl hairdresser
Addl hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod coord
Casting
Casting
Asst to prod
Asst to Ms. Herbert
Dial consultant
Loc casting
Extras casting
Extras casting
Unit pub
Prod secy
Loc accounting staff
Loc accounting staff
Loc accounting staff
Loc accounting staff
Bear trainer
Honeywagon driver
Generator op
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Hotel New Hampshire by John Irving (New York, 1981).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Good Golly Miss Molly," by Robert "Bumps" Blackwell and John Marascalco
"Tears On My Pillow," by S. Bradford and A. Lewis
"Bad Boy Blues," by Pierre P. Belmar
DETAILS
Release Date:
9 March 1984
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 9 March 1984
Production Date:
2 May--early July 1983 in Montreal and Tadoussac, Canada
Copyright Claimant:
Orion Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
14 May 1984
Copyright Number:
PA212964
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo® in selected theaters
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Arriflex®
Prints
Prints by De Luxe®
Duration(in mins):
108
MPAA Rating:
R
Countries:
Canada, United Kingdom, Austria, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27215
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In late 1950s Dairy, New Hampshire, the Berry children gather at bedtime to hear the story of how their parents, Win and Mary, met. While working summer jobs at the Hotel New Hampshire just prior to World War II, Win and Mary encountered an eccentric European named Freud, who travelled with a performing bear, “State O’ Maine.” Before returning to Europe, Freud urged Win and Mary to wed as soon as possible, and sold them State O’ Maine. They married and Win went off to war. When he returned, much had changed and the hotel closed. State O’ Maine, who Win had become very attached to, was shot by a boy in the woods. In the present, Win teaches at a second-rate preparatory school attended by his three oldest children, Frank, Franny, and John. Frank is aloof and studies taxidermy. Franny has a crush on a football player, Chip Dove, who bullies John. John and Franny are close, and John is sexually attracted to his sister. The Berrys have two younger children, Lilly, a dwarf, and a son named Egg. Win tells his father, Iowa Bob, the school’s football coach, that he finds his job unsatisfying. Frank taunts Franny and John about their relationship, and Frank and Franny brawl. Later, Chip Dove and a group of football players attack Frank. Franny and John rescue him, and Frank confesses he is gay. Meanwhile, Win tells Mary his plan to buy a closed girls’ school and turn it into a new Hotel New Hampshire. The family moves in and renovates the building. During the hotel’s grand opening, Iowa Bob is intoxicated and mocks his son’s ambitions. The following day, the hotel’s ... +


In late 1950s Dairy, New Hampshire, the Berry children gather at bedtime to hear the story of how their parents, Win and Mary, met. While working summer jobs at the Hotel New Hampshire just prior to World War II, Win and Mary encountered an eccentric European named Freud, who travelled with a performing bear, “State O’ Maine.” Before returning to Europe, Freud urged Win and Mary to wed as soon as possible, and sold them State O’ Maine. They married and Win went off to war. When he returned, much had changed and the hotel closed. State O’ Maine, who Win had become very attached to, was shot by a boy in the woods. In the present, Win teaches at a second-rate preparatory school attended by his three oldest children, Frank, Franny, and John. Frank is aloof and studies taxidermy. Franny has a crush on a football player, Chip Dove, who bullies John. John and Franny are close, and John is sexually attracted to his sister. The Berrys have two younger children, Lilly, a dwarf, and a son named Egg. Win tells his father, Iowa Bob, the school’s football coach, that he finds his job unsatisfying. Frank taunts Franny and John about their relationship, and Frank and Franny brawl. Later, Chip Dove and a group of football players attack Frank. Franny and John rescue him, and Frank confesses he is gay. Meanwhile, Win tells Mary his plan to buy a closed girls’ school and turn it into a new Hotel New Hampshire. The family moves in and renovates the building. During the hotel’s grand opening, Iowa Bob is intoxicated and mocks his son’s ambitions. The following day, the hotel’s new waitress, Ronda Ray, invites John to visit her quarters. Franny and Frank encourage their brother to lose his virginity and listen on the intercom as he and Ronda Ray make love. On Halloween, Win and Mary take the Berry’s elderly, flatulent dog, “Sorrow,” to be put to sleep. That night, Chip and some fellow football players capture Franny and John. Chip promises to release John if Franny leaves with him and his friends. An African American player, Junior Jones, offers to help John save Franny with his fraternity brothers. The men arrive as Chip rapes Franny, but they chase him and the other players away. After the assault, Franny seeks her deceased dog, Sorrow. The following day, Iowa Bob is outraged when the school trustees delay Chip and the other players’ expulsion until after a big football game. John begins weight-training under his grandfather’s tutelage in order to protect Franny in the future. Meanwhile, Frank steals Sorrow’s body, intending to stuff it as a Christmas present for Franny. On Christmas Day, however, the stuffed animal falls out of a closet in the weight room, causing Iowa Bob to have a fatal heart attack. On New Year’s Eve, the Berrys throw a party, and Junior’s older sister, Dark Inge, teaches John how to properly kiss a woman. Later, John seduces Franny’s school rival, Bitty Tuck. However, Bitty faints when she sees Sorrow’s body stored in a bathtub. At the end of the evening, Junior makes love to Ronda Ray, and John rejects the advances of a singer, Doris Wales. Win receives a letter from Freud inviting him and the family to Vienna, Austria, to run his hotel. Win sells the Hotel New Hampshire, and tells his family a parable of perseverance, about a street performer named King of Mice. Mary and Egg remain behind to close the hotel as the rest of the family arrives in Vienna at the Freud Gasthaus. Win and his children are greeted by the elderly and blind Freud, and a lesbian named Susie, who believes she is ugly and wears a bear costume. The Austrian hotel is occupied by prostitutes and radicals, including a pornographer named Ernst, who looks like Chip Dove. Meanwhile, the airplane carrying Mary and Egg explodes, killing them. As the rest of the family mourns, Franny claims she will take on the role of mother. The children beg Win to return to the U.S., but he has already invested their money in Freud’s hotel. Lilly worries that her father will always be chasing a dream that eludes him, and Win refurbishes the Gasthaus and renames it the Hotel New Hampshire. Meanwhile, Ernst espouses his sexual philosophies to Franny, and John asks Susie to protect his sister. Susie does so by seducing Franny, but Franny soon breaks off the relationship. John questions whether he and Franny will be lovers, but she warns him they can only be brother and sister. Later, Win admits to John that he has failed his family, and they must soon return to the U.S. One of the hotel radicals, Miss Miscarriage, invites John to her room and warns him that he and his family must leave Vienna because the rebels are planning to blow up the Vienna Opera and take the Berrys hostage. John pleads with Miscarriage to leave with them, but she feels she must fulfill her suicide mission. A virgin, Miscarriage asks John to make love to her before she dies. Schwanger, another radical, overhears them and shoots Miscarriage. The radicals enact their terrorist plot and round up the Berrys and Freud. When Win learns that Ernst made love to Franny, he crushes the radical’s skull with a baseball bat. Ernst and Schwanger take Freud outside, and the Berrys overwhelm the remaining radicals. Freud slams the baseball bat into the hood of the car to be used in the Opera House bombing, triggering the explosives. Win is blinded in the blast, but the Austrian government honors the Berrys for foiling the terrorist attack. The family and Susie return to the U.S., and a publisher purchases Lilly’s book, Trying to Grow, for a large sum. Later, Frank negotiates a three-book deal for Lilly, and a starring role for Franny in the movie version of Trying to Grow. Meanwhile, the Berrys reunite with Junior Jones, whose football career is ended by injuries. John continues to pine for Franny. One day in New York City, John and Susie bump into Chip Dove, Franny’s rapist. Chip says he wants to see Franny to apologize, and Susie informs him that she is at the Ritz-Carlton hotel. When Chip visits, the family takes its revenge, ending with Susie, dressed as the bear, sexually assaulting him. Franny sees enough, and calls them off, leaving Chip humiliated. Later, Franny gives in to John’s lust, and they consummate their incestuous relationship, hoping it will cure him. Trying to Grow is a hit as a film, and makes Franny a movie star, but Lily’s second book is a commercial and critical failure. Lilly is crushed and commits suicide by jumping out of a window. Later, the family reacquires the American Hotel New Hampshire, but does not open it to guests. Junior Jones and Franny marry, and after the wedding, Susie laments that she is too ugly to find happiness. That night, she sheds her bear costume and makes love with John. In the morning, John informs Win that Susie will be staying with them. Franny joins her brother and father at the lakefront, and John suggests that Lilly would have said, “Life is a fairy tale.” John imagines a world where they are reunited with the family and friends they have lost: their grandfather, Iowa Bob, their mother, Mary, young Egg, the bear, State O’Main, Sorrow the dog, and Freud. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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