Irreconcilable Differences (1984)

PG | 113 mins | Comedy-drama | 28 September 1984

Director:

Charles Shyer

Cinematographer:

William Fraker

Editor:

John F. Burnett

Production Designer:

Ida Random

Production Company:

Lantana Films
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HISTORY

]]]]On 31 Dec 1980, Var announced that Nancy Meyers and Charles Shyer had begun writing Irreconcilable Differences for Orion Pictures. The couple, who had recently co-wrote and produced the successful Private Benjamin (1980, see entry), also planned to produce Irreconcilable Differences. However, the project remained in limbo over the next several years. According to a 27 Apr 1983 Var production chart, principal photography began on 18 Apr 1983 in Los Angeles, CA, with financing from the independent Lantana Films. An additional 27 Apr 1983 Var news item reported that Warner Bros. Pictures had acquired domestic distribution rights.
       The film marked Charles Shyer’s directorial debut.
       End credits state: “’Arm in Arm’ and ‘No Picture’ from the book ‘Arm in Arm’ by Remy Charlip, ©1969 by Remy Charlip, published by Parents’ Magazine Press.” The picture was: “Filmed on location in Los Angeles and at Laird International Studios, in association with Angeles Entertainment ... More Less

]]]]On 31 Dec 1980, Var announced that Nancy Meyers and Charles Shyer had begun writing Irreconcilable Differences for Orion Pictures. The couple, who had recently co-wrote and produced the successful Private Benjamin (1980, see entry), also planned to produce Irreconcilable Differences. However, the project remained in limbo over the next several years. According to a 27 Apr 1983 Var production chart, principal photography began on 18 Apr 1983 in Los Angeles, CA, with financing from the independent Lantana Films. An additional 27 Apr 1983 Var news item reported that Warner Bros. Pictures had acquired domestic distribution rights.
       The film marked Charles Shyer’s directorial debut.
       End credits state: “’Arm in Arm’ and ‘No Picture’ from the book ‘Arm in Arm’ by Remy Charlip, ©1969 by Remy Charlip, published by Parents’ Magazine Press.” The picture was: “Filmed on location in Los Angeles and at Laird International Studios, in association with Angeles Entertainment Group.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 May 1984
p. 2, 6.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 1984
p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
28 Sep 1984
p. 1.
New York Times
28 Sep 1984
p. 10.
Variety
31 Dec 1980.
---
Variety
27 Apr 1983.
---
Variety
16 May 1984
p. 132.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
D.G.A. trainee
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Best boy
Key grip
Dolly grip
Best boy
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Leadman
Set dresser
Drapery man
Const foreman
Labor foreman
Paint pusher
Standby painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Men's costumer
Women's costumer
Sam Wanamaker's ward by
Jewelry furnished by
"Atlanta" jackets by
MUSIC
Selected piano solos performed by
Mus supv
SOUND
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec recordist
Boom op
Cableperson
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Titles and opticals
Matte paintings
Spec eff
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Filmic consultant
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Scr supv
Asst to prods
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Prod coord
Asst to Ms. Meyers and Mr. Shyer
Asst to Ms. Meyers and Mr. Shyer
Asst to Ms. Meyers and Mr. Shyer
Asst to Ms. Meyers and Mr. Shyer
Prod accountant
Prod accountant
Tech consultant
Voice casting
Voice casting
Asst prod accountant
Craft service
STAND INS
Stunt double
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"You And Me (We Wanted It All)," by Carole Bayer Sager, Peter Allen, Unichappel Music, Inc., Begonia Melodies, Inc., Irving Music, Inc., Woolnough Music, Inc., performed by Frank Sinatra, courtesy of Reprise Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products © Warner Bros. Records, Inc.
"You've Got A Friend," by Carole King, Colgems-EMI Music, Inc., performed by James Taylor, courtesy of Warner Bros, Records, Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"I Wish You Love" ("Que Reste-T-Il De Nos Amours"), French lyric and music by Charles Trenet, English lyric by Albert A. Beach, Leeds Music Corporation (MCA), performed by Nat King Cole, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc.
+
SONGS
"You And Me (We Wanted It All)," by Carole Bayer Sager, Peter Allen, Unichappel Music, Inc., Begonia Melodies, Inc., Irving Music, Inc., Woolnough Music, Inc., performed by Frank Sinatra, courtesy of Reprise Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products © Warner Bros. Records, Inc.
"You've Got A Friend," by Carole King, Colgems-EMI Music, Inc., performed by James Taylor, courtesy of Warner Bros, Records, Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"I Wish You Love" ("Que Reste-T-Il De Nos Amours"), French lyric and music by Charles Trenet, English lyric by Albert A. Beach, Leeds Music Corporation (MCA), performed by Nat King Cole, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc.
"Waiting," (Theme from "Father Knows Best"), by Don Ferris, I. Friedman, L. Pober, Criterion Music Corporation
"The Sheik Of Araby," by Harry B. Smith, Francis Wheeler, Ted Snyder, Mills Music, Inc., Sidney R. Smith Estate, Ted Snyder Publishing Company
"Take Off," by Reggie Knighton, Reggie Knighton Music
"This Belle," by Jerry Belson, Harvey Miller.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
28 September 1984
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 28 September 1984
Copyright Claimant:
Angeles Cinema Investors
Copyright Date:
5 November 1984
Copyright Number:
PA234752
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex Camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
113
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27256
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Los Angeles, California, eight-year-old Casey Brodsky takes her divorced parents to court, suing for child emancipation so she can live with the family’s housekeeper, Maria Hernandez. During the trial, Albert Brodsky and Lucy Van Patten Brodsky take the stand to explain the tribulations of their marriage, and defend their poor parenting: The couple met one year before Casey was born, when Albert was hitchhiking cross-country to Hollywood for his new job as a film professor, and they were married after a tumultuous four-day courtship, even though Lucy was already engaged to another man. Settling into a modest home in Los Angeles, Lucy studies real estate while aspiring to be a children’s writer, and Albert’s encyclopedic knowledge of film captures the admiration of a powerful Hollywood producer named David Kessler. One night, the Brodskys are invited to private screening of David’s new movie, and he presses Albert for a critique. When Albert suggests the picture is poorly edited, David begs him to quit academia and fix the film, promising to double his salary. Lucy worries about sacrificing their modest, middle-class values for a Hollywood lifestyle of excess and infidelity, but Albert vows to prioritize their budding family and she encourages him to accept the offer. The re-cut movie is a sensation, and David tells Albert about a long-time pet project called An American Romance, which has failed to gain interest from studios. If Albert writes a suitable adaptation, he will be awarded his directorial debut. However, Albert suffers writer’s block and convinces Lucy to leave real estate school so she can collaborate on the screenplay. When ... +


In Los Angeles, California, eight-year-old Casey Brodsky takes her divorced parents to court, suing for child emancipation so she can live with the family’s housekeeper, Maria Hernandez. During the trial, Albert Brodsky and Lucy Van Patten Brodsky take the stand to explain the tribulations of their marriage, and defend their poor parenting: The couple met one year before Casey was born, when Albert was hitchhiking cross-country to Hollywood for his new job as a film professor, and they were married after a tumultuous four-day courtship, even though Lucy was already engaged to another man. Settling into a modest home in Los Angeles, Lucy studies real estate while aspiring to be a children’s writer, and Albert’s encyclopedic knowledge of film captures the admiration of a powerful Hollywood producer named David Kessler. One night, the Brodskys are invited to private screening of David’s new movie, and he presses Albert for a critique. When Albert suggests the picture is poorly edited, David begs him to quit academia and fix the film, promising to double his salary. Lucy worries about sacrificing their modest, middle-class values for a Hollywood lifestyle of excess and infidelity, but Albert vows to prioritize their budding family and she encourages him to accept the offer. The re-cut movie is a sensation, and David tells Albert about a long-time pet project called An American Romance, which has failed to gain interest from studios. If Albert writes a suitable adaptation, he will be awarded his directorial debut. However, Albert suffers writer’s block and convinces Lucy to leave real estate school so she can collaborate on the screenplay. When An American Romance is a critical and box-office success, Albert becomes an overnight celebrity and the family moves into a larger home, but Lucy resents being outshone by her husband, and young Casey is increasingly ignored by her preoccupied, egotistical parents. As Lucy and Albert argue, Casey bonds with their housekeeper, Maria Hernandez, and refuses to speak English to her parents. Despite their marital woes, the Brodskys collaborate on a new film, Gabrielle. They struggle to find an ingénue for the title role, until Albert discovers a young waitress named Blake Chandler and casts her on the spot, inviting her to move into the family home so she can learn the part more quickly. In time, Albert begins an affair with Blake and Lucy is devastated. She takes custody of Casey and moves into a small apartment, where she gains weight and struggles to become an independent writer. Meanwhile, Gabrielle is a blockbuster, and Albert buys lavish estate for himself and Blake, satisfying her every whim. When Blake insists on starring in a musical remake of Gone with the Wind, Blake dedicates himself the $22 million production despite warnings from David Kessler, who refuses to finance the production. The film fails at the box-office, leaving Albert bankrupt and abandoned by his Hollywood associates. Blake disappears with her limousine driver, and the dejected Albert takes up residence in a dingy motel. Meanwhile, Lucy writes a thinly-veiled, fictionalized account of her failed marriage called He Said It Was Going to Be Forever, and the novel becomes a bestseller, prompting her to regain her confidence and her slim figure. Moving into Albert’s mansion, Lucy becomes egomaniacal and vengeful, and Casey takes refuge with Maria yet again. One night, Albert comes to the estate uninvited and apologizes to Lucy, but she is not receptive, until they discover Casey is missing. They find her at Maria’s home after a frantic search, and realize they have lost touch with their daughter. Albert invites Lucy to a bar and they make love. The next morning, however, the couple’s brief reconciliation devolves into a violent confrontation when Albert solicits Lucy for work, asking permission to direct the film adaptation of He Said It Was Going to Be Forever. As Lucy accuses Albert of seducing her to get the job, and Albert condemns Lucy’s emotional detachment and neglectful parenting, Casey returns home with Maria. The Brodskys grab their daughter’s arms and pull her in opposite directions, threatening to take sole possession of the girl in an effort to punish each other. Back in the courtroom, Casey ends her testimony, explaining that the incident prompted her to run away and live with Maria. The girl argues that she must “divorce” her parents because they treat her like a dog rather than a human being—they pay attention to her only when it suits their busy schedules, or when they need to boost their frail egos. Lucy and Albert cry as they listen to their daughter’s plea, and the judge sides with the girl, placng her in the custody of Maria Hernandez. One day, Lucy accidentally arrives at Maria’s house on Albert’s visiting day, but he invites her to join them for lunch. Humbled by their love for Casey, the Brodskys remember the unadulterated emotions that once brought them together, and see a glimmer of hope for the family’s future. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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