Meatballs Part II (1984)

PG | 87 mins | Comedy | 27 July 1984

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HISTORY

Meatballs Part II was the second film in the Meatballs franchise, although the story and characters had no connection to the original film. Ivan Reitman, director of the first Meatballs (1979), stated in the 26 May 1984 LAHExam that he and comedian Bill Murray were not associated with the 1984 production, and expressed disappointment that fans of the original might be “lured” to the sequel based on the title.
       Principal photography began on 13 Dec 1983 under the working title, Summertime, according to a 1983 HR production chart. Production notes in AMPAS library files indicate that filming took place over seven weeks at a camp north of Santa Barbara, CA. To give the appearance of summer during Dec, the filmmakers transported green foliage to the location.
       A 13 Jul 1984 HR brief announced that the picture would open on 27 Jul 1984 on 1,200 screens.
       Actor Hamilton Camp’s character is spelled “Hershey” in onscreen credits, while in the film, the name reads “Hershy” on his office door and uniform.
       End credits state: “Special thanks to Elayne Boosler”; “Camp Patton sequence filmed at Veluzat Movie Ranch, Saugus, Ca.”; and, “The Producers Wish to Thank: Chrysler Motors; Jack Daniels Distillery; Olympia Beer; The Commercial Group; Alta Marea Productions, Inc.; Roger La Combe’s Karate Studio; Tuf-Wear; Associated Film Promotions; Unique Products Placement; Nike; Lacoste; Bell ... More Less

Meatballs Part II was the second film in the Meatballs franchise, although the story and characters had no connection to the original film. Ivan Reitman, director of the first Meatballs (1979), stated in the 26 May 1984 LAHExam that he and comedian Bill Murray were not associated with the 1984 production, and expressed disappointment that fans of the original might be “lured” to the sequel based on the title.
       Principal photography began on 13 Dec 1983 under the working title, Summertime, according to a 1983 HR production chart. Production notes in AMPAS library files indicate that filming took place over seven weeks at a camp north of Santa Barbara, CA. To give the appearance of summer during Dec, the filmmakers transported green foliage to the location.
       A 13 Jul 1984 HR brief announced that the picture would open on 27 Jul 1984 on 1,200 screens.
       Actor Hamilton Camp’s character is spelled “Hershey” in onscreen credits, while in the film, the name reads “Hershy” on his office door and uniform.
       End credits state: “Special thanks to Elayne Boosler”; “Camp Patton sequence filmed at Veluzat Movie Ranch, Saugus, Ca.”; and, “The Producers Wish to Thank: Chrysler Motors; Jack Daniels Distillery; Olympia Beer; The Commercial Group; Alta Marea Productions, Inc.; Roger La Combe’s Karate Studio; Tuf-Wear; Associated Film Promotions; Unique Products Placement; Nike; Lacoste; Bell Helmets.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jul 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 1984
p. 4, 13.
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
26 May 1984
Section A, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
31 Jul 1984
Section F, p. 3.
New York Times
18 Aug 1984
p. 13.
Variety
1 Aug 1984
p. 13.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Space Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr/1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
2d unit dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Key gaffer
Key grip
Still photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Elec best boy
Lamp op
Grip best boy
Dolly grip
2d unit dir of photog
Cam op, 2d unit
Cam asst, 2d unit
ART DIRECTORS
Story artist
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Set des
Asst prop master
Const coord
Supv greensman
Greensman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Ward asst
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus rec eng
Synthesizer mus & eff comp & performed by
SOUND
Prod mixer
Supv sd ed
Boom op
Cable
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff coord
Spec eff unit
Spec eff unit
Spec eff unit
Spec eff unit
Spec eff unit
Spec eff unit
Spec eff unit
Spec eff unit
Meathead des by
Main titles by
Spec visual eff by
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Scr supv
Prod/Post prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst to Mr. Poe
Post prod asst
Teacher/Welfare worker
First aid
Craft service
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Scr supv, 2d unit
Prod payroll, services, & facilities provided by
Prod insurance provided by
Consultant, Albert G. Ruben Company
Caterer, Tony's Food Service
Caterer, Tony's Food Service
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts performed by
Stunts performed by
Stunts performed by
Stunts performed by
Stunts performed by
Stunts performed by
Stunts performed by
Stunts performed by
Stunts performed by
Stunts performed by
Stand-in
Stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col prints by
Timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"We've Been Waiting For The Summer," music by Ken Harrison, lyrics by Hermine Hilton.
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Title:
Summertime
Release Date:
27 July 1984
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 27 July 1984
New York opening: week of 18 August 1984
Production Date:
13 December 1983--early winter 1984
Copyright Claimant:
Space Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
10 August 1984
Copyright Number:
PA223155
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
87
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27130
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At co-ed Camp Sasquatch, director Giddy welcomes new arrivals to the summer session. To satisfy his community service, juvenile delinquent, Armand “Flash” Carducci, is assigned to the camp as a counselor in training (CIT). He grumbles about the place, until he catches the eye of a beautiful female camper named Cheryl. Having grown up in a sheltered environment, Cheryl is anxious about interacting with boys, but immediately makes friends with streetwise Nancy who lends her a stylish outfit. Another camper, Tommy McVee, is handicapped and arrives in a high-speed wheelchair. Among the adults in charge, counselor Jamie looks forward to a romantic rendezvous with buxom colleague Fanny, who oversees the girls’ cabin. Across the lake at Camp Patton, director Colonel “Batjack” Hershey and his closeted-homosexual assistant, Felix Foxglove, have modeled their rustic retreat after a military base with a welcoming sign reading: “where outdoor living molds killers.” Every summer, the two rival camps compete in a boxing match known as “Champ of the Lake.” Aware that Flash has been in a few fights, Giddy asks the young man if he will be a sparring partner for their star boxer, “Boomer,” but Flash is not a team player, and refuses. Flash is assigned to Cabin Six and tells the boys to obey one rule, leave him alone. On the first night, an unidentified flying object (UFO) arrives at Camp Sasquatch and drops off a young extraterrestrial, hoping to earn an “Earth Merit Badge.” In the morning, the Cabin Six boys find the alien, dressed wearing a yellow rain hat and hiding in an outdoor toilet. The boys ask its ... +


At co-ed Camp Sasquatch, director Giddy welcomes new arrivals to the summer session. To satisfy his community service, juvenile delinquent, Armand “Flash” Carducci, is assigned to the camp as a counselor in training (CIT). He grumbles about the place, until he catches the eye of a beautiful female camper named Cheryl. Having grown up in a sheltered environment, Cheryl is anxious about interacting with boys, but immediately makes friends with streetwise Nancy who lends her a stylish outfit. Another camper, Tommy McVee, is handicapped and arrives in a high-speed wheelchair. Among the adults in charge, counselor Jamie looks forward to a romantic rendezvous with buxom colleague Fanny, who oversees the girls’ cabin. Across the lake at Camp Patton, director Colonel “Batjack” Hershey and his closeted-homosexual assistant, Felix Foxglove, have modeled their rustic retreat after a military base with a welcoming sign reading: “where outdoor living molds killers.” Every summer, the two rival camps compete in a boxing match known as “Champ of the Lake.” Aware that Flash has been in a few fights, Giddy asks the young man if he will be a sparring partner for their star boxer, “Boomer,” but Flash is not a team player, and refuses. Flash is assigned to Cabin Six and tells the boys to obey one rule, leave him alone. On the first night, an unidentified flying object (UFO) arrives at Camp Sasquatch and drops off a young extraterrestrial, hoping to earn an “Earth Merit Badge.” In the morning, the Cabin Six boys find the alien, dressed wearing a yellow rain hat and hiding in an outdoor toilet. The boys ask its name, but misunderstand and believe the alien says, “Meathead.” At first, they conceal the extraterrestrial in an abandoned outhouse, but during a thunderstorm Meathead takes refuge with the boys inside the cabin. At the recreation center, Flash sees Cheryl working out with the aerobics class and spars with the dull-witted Boomer to impress her. However, Giddy is more impressed as Flash knocks Boomer to the ground. When Nancy realizes that Cheryl has no knowledge of sex or the male anatomy, she and her cabin mates are determined to show Cheryl a penis by the end of the summer. Meanwhile, Colonel Hershey acquires rights to the lake from Native American Chief Rawhide, and plans to force Camp Sasquatch out of business. The Colonel refuses to negotiate when Giddy says he cannot run the camp without access to the lake. In retaliation, Giddy concocts his own scheme and tells the intolerant Colonel that he intends to sell Camp Sasquatch to a sect of Hare Krishnas. Giddy offers to cancel the deal if the Colonel awards water rights to the winner of this year’s Champ of the Lake. However, if Giddy loses, he must relinquish Camp Sasquatch. The Colonel agrees, but as soon as he is back at his headquarters, he assigns one of his henchmen, Sergeant Paladin, to incapacitate Boomer, while the rest of Sasquatch is occupied at a dance. During the event at the recreation center, Cheryl and Flash have their first conversation while slow dancing. Flash claims he is a nice altar boy when Cheryl asks about his mean reputation. Meanwhile, counselors Jamie and Fanny find a secluded place to have sex, but someone barges in, as usual. In her mission to educate Cheryl, Nancy cajoles Eddie, a counselor in training, to run naked by Cheryl’s bunk in Cabin Ten later that night. However, a mischievous boy overhears the conversation and switches the sign on Cabin Ten and the one on Cabin Nine, which is counselor Fanny’s cabin. As a result, Jamie arrives in Cabin Ten expecting a romantic rendezvous, while Eddie slips into Fanny’s cabin and removes his clothes. Both intruders are immediately ousted. The next morning, Flash finally discovers Meathead’s existence, but the boys in the cabin assure him the kind creature is no trouble. At the recreation room, Flash arrives to find Boomer with a broken arm, and Giddy training to box. Flash convinces Giddy that he will fight in Champ of the Lake. Meanwhile, at Camp Patton, the Colonel keeps his boxer, “Mad Dog,” in a cage and feeds him raw steak. Nancy arranges a romantic tryst between Cheryl and Flash by the lake, but tells Cheryl the meeting will involve looking at the stars, while Flash believes they are going skinny-dipping. Nancy and her friends position themselves in a tree to spy on the couple. However, chaos ensues when Cheryl comes face to face with a bear, Flash is kidnapped in the nude by a “counterinsurgency” squad from Camp Patton, and Jamie and Fanny are again interrupted while fooling around nearby. On Champ of the Lake day, Flash wakes up at Camp Patton dressed in a towel and stumbles into Felix Foxglove’s room, where he finds a closet full of women’s clothing. Meanwhile, a sold-out crowd is gathered at Sasquatch recreation center for the boxing match, as the Colonel introduces “Mad Dog,” and Giddy anxiously waits for Flash to arrive. When the young man enters wearing a dress, the crowd is dumbfounded, but the campers of Sasquatch cheer loudly as Flash asks for boxing gloves. During the first round, Flash struggles against the bigger opponent and is continually thrown out the ring. In the next round, Flash appears defeated, and does not get up off the mat. Sitting in the crowd, Meathead transmits a special energy to the young man, allowing him to rise, fight, and fly above his opponent. The Colonel attempts to eliminate the alien with a grenade, but the handicapped Tommy McVee intervenes, knocking the explosive from the Colonel’s hand. Meathead takes control of the weapon, sending it to chase the Colonel out of the recreation center. Although the alien is distracted from relaying superpowers to the ring, Flash still manages to defeat his exhausted opponent. As Flash raises his arms in victory, Mad Dog pulls down his dress, allowing Cheryl to finally get a glimpse of the male anatomy. Having survived the grenade attack, the wounded Colonel begs Giddy to reconsider their deal, but Giddy only offers his rival a self-improvement workshop. On the last day, Meathead says goodbye to his cabin mates as his parents pick him up in their UFO. Before boarding the bus, Cheryl gives Flash a passionate kiss and invites him to visit her.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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