Streets of Fire (1984)

PG | 105 mins | Drama, Romance | 1 June 1984

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HISTORY

Opening credits include title cards that read: "A rock & roll fable," and, "Another time, another place..."
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, the recording group, The Blasters, made their theatrical feature film debut as “Torchie’s” entertainers.
       A 20 Feb 1984 People news item reported that Holly Sherwood and Laurie Sargent were voice doubles for actress Diane Lane’s singing voice.
       A 5 Apr 1983 HR production chart stated that principal photography began 4 Apr 1983. Filming began in Chicago, IL, then moved Los Angeles, CA, according to production notes. Additional filming included two weeks at a soap factory in Wilmington, CA, and Universal City Studios provided facilities for half of the filming. The production proposed to save between $250,000 and $500,000 in overtime costs by constructing a huge tent on a few sets of Universal’s back lot to shoot night scenes during the day, according to a 30 Mar 1983 LAT article. A 1 Jun 1983 LAT article stated that the $1.2 million tarp was composed of 126,000 square yards of fabric. Production notes stated that the areas that were tarped were a New York City street set and the Brownstone as well as the “Richmond District,” the hometown of “Tom Cody” and “Ellen Aim,” as well as “the Battery” and “the Strip”, other settings in the film. Interior shooting for Torchie’s was filmed on Universal’s Stage 22. The exterior of the Richmond Theatre, where Ellen was kidnapped, was also filmed on the Universal backlot, while the orchestra section of the Wiltern Theatre, located in Los Angeles, was used to film the theater’s interior for concert sequences. ... More Less

Opening credits include title cards that read: "A rock & roll fable," and, "Another time, another place..."
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, the recording group, The Blasters, made their theatrical feature film debut as “Torchie’s” entertainers.
       A 20 Feb 1984 People news item reported that Holly Sherwood and Laurie Sargent were voice doubles for actress Diane Lane’s singing voice.
       A 5 Apr 1983 HR production chart stated that principal photography began 4 Apr 1983. Filming began in Chicago, IL, then moved Los Angeles, CA, according to production notes. Additional filming included two weeks at a soap factory in Wilmington, CA, and Universal City Studios provided facilities for half of the filming. The production proposed to save between $250,000 and $500,000 in overtime costs by constructing a huge tent on a few sets of Universal’s back lot to shoot night scenes during the day, according to a 30 Mar 1983 LAT article. A 1 Jun 1983 LAT article stated that the $1.2 million tarp was composed of 126,000 square yards of fabric. Production notes stated that the areas that were tarped were a New York City street set and the Brownstone as well as the “Richmond District,” the hometown of “Tom Cody” and “Ellen Aim,” as well as “the Battery” and “the Strip”, other settings in the film. Interior shooting for Torchie’s was filmed on Universal’s Stage 22. The exterior of the Richmond Theatre, where Ellen was kidnapped, was also filmed on the Universal backlot, while the orchestra section of the Wiltern Theatre, located in Los Angeles, was used to film the theater’s interior for concert sequences.
       “Tom Cody’s” stolen convertible was a customized 1951 Mercury. In addition, Los Angeles-based biker clubs provided motorcycles for the Bombers, while close to fifty club members worked as extras. Another 500 extras were employed for sequences involving the Richmond District. The 1 Jun 1983 LAT article reported that some of the stunt work involved motorcyclists racing around streets surrounding the soap factory while two gas tanks exploded.
       Lead costumes were a collaboration between fashion designer Giorgio Armani and costume designer Marilyn Vance. Approximately 200 garments were sewn in duplicate and triplicate at Armani’s factory in Milan, Italy. Armani also contributed pieces to dress extras.
       Production notes stated that principal photography was completed 18 Aug 1983.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
5 Apr 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
31 May 1984
p. 4, 12.
Los Angeles Times
30 Mar 1983
Section VI, pp. 1-2.
Los Angeles Times
1 Jun 1983
p.1,5.
Los Angeles Times
31 May 1984
p. 1.
New York Times
1 Jun 1984
p. 8.
People
20 Feb 1984.
---
Variety
30 May 1984
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Universal Pictures And RKO Pictures Present
A Hill Gordon Silver Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Addl asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
1st cam asst
1st cam asst
1st cam asst
Spec video material supv
Spec concert lighting des
Stills photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Prop master
Const coord
Prod painter
Leadman
Leadman
Set des
Set des
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward provided by
Cost supv
Cost supv
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus score
Spec mus material supv
Scoring band
Scoring band
Scoring band
Scoring band
Scoring band
Scoring band
Scoring band
Scoring band
Scoring band
Scoring band
Asst mus ed
Asst mus ed
SOUND
Prod sd
Playback rec
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
ADR rec
Foley by
Foley by
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec
Re-rec
Spec mus sd consultant
Dolby Stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles and transitional eff des and prod by
Spec eff
Opticals by
DANCE
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod assoc
Casting
Casting
Extra casting
Extra casting
Extra casting
Vocal eff adv
Pub coord
Scr supv
Prod coord
Cost estimator
Asst to Walter Hill
Asst to Larry Gordon
Asst to Larry Gordon
Asst to Gene Levy
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Supv col consultant
Col consultant
Col consultant
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Nowhere Fast,” performed by Fire Inc., vocals: Laurie Sargent, Rory Dodd, Holly Sherwood, Eric Troyer, written and produced by Jim Steinman
“Get Out Of Denver,” performed by The Ry Cooder Band, written by Bob Seeger, produced by Ry Cooder
“Hold That Snake,” performed by The Ry Cooder Band, written by Ry Cooder and Jim Dickinson, produced by Ry Cooder
+
SONGS
“Nowhere Fast,” performed by Fire Inc., vocals: Laurie Sargent, Rory Dodd, Holly Sherwood, Eric Troyer, written and produced by Jim Steinman
“Get Out Of Denver,” performed by The Ry Cooder Band, written by Bob Seeger, produced by Ry Cooder
“Hold That Snake,” performed by The Ry Cooder Band, written by Ry Cooder and Jim Dickinson, produced by Ry Cooder
“Never Be You,” performed by Laurie Sargent, written by Tom Petty and Benmont Tench, produced by Jimmy Iovine
“One Bad Stud,” performed by The Blasters, written by [Jerry] Leiber & [Mike] Stoller, produced by Phil Alvin and Pat Burnette
“Blue Shadows,” performed by The Blasters, written by Dave Alvin, produced by Phil Alvin and Pat Burnette
“Sorcerer,” performed by Laurie Sargent, written by Stevie Nicks, produced by Jimmy Iovine
“Countdown To Love,” performed by Winston Ford, written by Kenny Vance and Marty Kupersmith, produced by Kenny Vance
“You Got What You Wanted,” performed by The Ry Cooder Band, written by Ry Cooder and Jim Dickinson, produced by Ry Cooder
“First Love First Tears,” performed by The Ry Cooder Band, written by Duane Eddy/ Lee Hazlewood, produced by Ry Cooder
“Rumble,” performed by The Ry Cooder Band, written by Link Wray/ Milt Grant, produced by Ry Cooder
“I Can Dream About You,” performed by Winston Ford, written by Dan Hartman, produced by Jimmy Iovine and Dan Hartman
“Tonight Is What It Means To Be Young,” performed by Fire Inc., vocals: Holly Sherwood, Rory Dodd, Eric Troyer, written and produced by Jim Steinman
“Deeper And Deeper,” performed by The Fixx, written by Cy Curnin, Jamie West-Oran, Adam Woods, Rupert Greenall and Dan K. Brown, produced by Robert Hine for Gestalt.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 June 1984
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 1 June 1984
Production Date:
4 April--18 August 1983 in Chicago, IL, and Los Angeles, CA
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios, Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 July 1984
Copyright Number:
PA232416
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Lenses/Prints
Panaflex® Camera and Lenses by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
105
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27368
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

A sellout crowd attends a benefit concert in the Richmond district performed by rock singer Ellen Aim and the Attackers. Suddenly, a motorcycle gang called the Bombers rushes the stage and Raven, the leader, abducts Ellen on his motorcycle. At a nearby city diner, the Road Masters gang threatens Reva Cody, a waitress, who attended the benefit concert, and the gang leader challenges Tom Cody, Reva’s younger brother, to a knife fight, and Tom hurls the gang members out the diner window. After the fight, Tom takes Reva for a ride in his gleaming, new stolen convertible. She suggests that Tom rescue his old girl friend Ellen, but Tom thinks it is a job for Ellen’s current boyfriend, Billy Fish, who is also her manager. At the Blackhawk bar, McCoy, a female patron, demands another drink, while Tom talks to his friend Clyde, the bartender. When Clyde asks McCoy to leave, she punches the bartender in the face, steals a bottle of Tequila and invites Tom to join her. Tom and McCoy find they have a lot in common. She is a retired military mechanic and worked in the motor pool, and he is a retired soldier. Later, McCoy spends the night on Reva’s couch, where she hides her gun in the upholstery. Before Tom retires, he gazes at a worn photograph of Ellen that he keeps in his wallet, and informs his sister that if he and Billy can strike a deal, he will rescue Ellen. Tom buys stolen, custom weapons, and Billy agrees to pay Tom $10,000 and offers to accompany Tom around The Battery, a tough part of town where Ellen is being ... +


A sellout crowd attends a benefit concert in the Richmond district performed by rock singer Ellen Aim and the Attackers. Suddenly, a motorcycle gang called the Bombers rushes the stage and Raven, the leader, abducts Ellen on his motorcycle. At a nearby city diner, the Road Masters gang threatens Reva Cody, a waitress, who attended the benefit concert, and the gang leader challenges Tom Cody, Reva’s younger brother, to a knife fight, and Tom hurls the gang members out the diner window. After the fight, Tom takes Reva for a ride in his gleaming, new stolen convertible. She suggests that Tom rescue his old girl friend Ellen, but Tom thinks it is a job for Ellen’s current boyfriend, Billy Fish, who is also her manager. At the Blackhawk bar, McCoy, a female patron, demands another drink, while Tom talks to his friend Clyde, the bartender. When Clyde asks McCoy to leave, she punches the bartender in the face, steals a bottle of Tequila and invites Tom to join her. Tom and McCoy find they have a lot in common. She is a retired military mechanic and worked in the motor pool, and he is a retired soldier. Later, McCoy spends the night on Reva’s couch, where she hides her gun in the upholstery. Before Tom retires, he gazes at a worn photograph of Ellen that he keeps in his wallet, and informs his sister that if he and Billy can strike a deal, he will rescue Ellen. Tom buys stolen, custom weapons, and Billy agrees to pay Tom $10,000 and offers to accompany Tom around The Battery, a tough part of town where Ellen is being held hostage. When McCoy wants to join the rescue team, Tom agrees to pay her a cut of his fee. As they drive to The Battery, an area Billy knows well, Billy thinks that the Bombers are holding Ellen at a club called Torchie’s. There, Raven has bound and gagged Ellen to a bed in the back of the club, and informs her that if she agrees to a quick affair, he will release her in two weeks, but she refuses. A homeless man tells Tom, Billy and McCoy that Ellen is being held prisoner on the second floor of Torchie’s. Tom instructs Billy to drive the car to the club’s front entrance in fifteen minutes, then orders McCoy to check out the club while he looks for Ellen. A Bomber gang member invites McCoy upstairs to party, but when he takes her to an empty room, she knocks him unconscious with her gun. Then, McCoy breaks up Raven’s card game. Meanwhile, a shot from Tom’s rifle on the roof encases one motorcycle rider in flames. After Tom sets several other explosions that empty the club, Tom frees Ellen but instructs McCoy, Ellen and Billy to meet him at Grand Street while he stays behind to create more diversions. Afterward, Tom steals a motorcycle as Raven vows his revenge. Billy wants to leave The Battery; however, Ellen will not go until Tom is safe. McCoy tells Billy that Tom and Ellen used to be lovers, while Billy reveals to Ellen that Tom is a mercenary, who was paid good money to find her. Tom reunites with his friends, and announces he has to get rid of his car. He accuses Ellen of having put her career before their relationship, but she blames Tom of running away, joining the military, and disappearing for two years. The rescue gang hijacks a tour bus from an African-American boy band called the Sorels. When the band recognizes Ellen, they ask if they can be her opening act. Billy warns Tom that Ellen is no longer interested in him. The Sorels entertain Ellen and Billy with their doo-wop singing until they are stopped at a police checkpoint. Tom firebombs the patrol cars, and McCoy confiscates the officers’ weapons. Tom and the others leave the bus to catch a train. Later, Raven asks for a meeting with the Richmond police, and vows that the gang fighting will stop if the force surrenders Tom. Later, a police officer orders Tom to leave town before trouble starts again, so he visits Billy and Ellen to collect his money. After Billy hands Tom the $10,000, Tom informs Ellen that he is no longer in love with her. Tom takes $1,000 to pay McCoy and returns the rest of the money. Ellen cries that she had no choice but to get on with her life when Tom disappeared and he kisses her, provoking Ellen’s decision to leave town with Tom. Meanwhile, Tom asks McCoy for her help on another job. He knocks Ellen unconscious with a punch and tells McCoy to hide her. He announces his plans to go back to the Bombers to take care of unfinished business. Instead, the Richmond police set up a meeting between Tom, Raven, and the Bombers under the elevated train tracks. Raven arrives with a small army of motorcycle gang members, while Tom surfaces with an armed gang of his own neighborhood thugs. Tom and Raven are given identical rock hammers but the warfare turns into a fistfight after Raven drops his hammer. Tom overpowers Raven and he collapses. The police arrest Raven and life returns to normal as the Sorels open for Ellen’s next concert. As Tom and Billy watch the show from the wings, Billy announces he is prepared to step aside if Tom and Ellen reunite, but Tom responds that Ellen needs Billy, who is more reliable. In the wings, Tom reminds Ellen that he is not the kind of guy who will carry her guitars around, but he will always be there for her and kisses her goodbye. Tom leaves the theater as McCoy pulls up in Tom’s convertible. She offers him a ride, but when he hints that they might have a future together, McCoy reminds him that he is not her type. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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