Black Moon Rising (1986)

R | 100 mins | Drama | 10 January 1986

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HISTORY

The following message appears on title cards in opening credits: “To: Lt. R. Johnson, Los Angeles Division. From: FBI, Washington. Re: File #01196067. Grand Jury investigation of Lucky Dollar Corporation, Las Vegas. Message follows: Attorney General requires all financial records and statements for last tax year. Sources indicate pertinent information on data tape #T57-65. Legal procedures exhausted. Use free-lance operative. Time Factor: Critical. Message ends.”
       The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “ Special thanks to Jeff Schechtman,” and “The Producers would also like to thank the following for their cooperation: Apollo Computer Inc.--Michael Sciulli, Philip Neale, Steve Reber; Arco Center; Coldwell Banker; Norland Properties; Digital Equipment Corporation; Levocolor-Lorentzen, Inc.; Laser effects by Laser Sound; Technical security advice by Instructional Technology Service; Time Systems, Inc.; Cardkey Systems, Inc.; Carpet by Masland Carpets and Allied Chemical Corporation; Lindsey & Hall, Inc.; National Performance Centers, Inc.; Bayless Stationers, Inglewood, California; National Motorsports; English Leather; Calendar Girls Pageant; Kristina Garan; Heidi Gardner; Lisa Stofflet; George Houraney; Larry Joseph; Jack Scanlon.” End credits also state: “Sculptures and prints in Ryland’s office after the work of Eduardo Paolozzi by kind permission of the artist,” and “Filmed on location in Hollywood.”
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, director Harley Cokliss’ interest in the project dated back to 1983 when he was first offered the script. At the time, his full schedule dictated that he pass on making the film. Later, Cokliss got a second chance when he met producers Douglas Curtis and Joel B. Michaels while working on another New World Pictures film titled The Philadelphia Experiment (1984, see entry), and the men became interested in working together.
       During ... More Less

The following message appears on title cards in opening credits: “To: Lt. R. Johnson, Los Angeles Division. From: FBI, Washington. Re: File #01196067. Grand Jury investigation of Lucky Dollar Corporation, Las Vegas. Message follows: Attorney General requires all financial records and statements for last tax year. Sources indicate pertinent information on data tape #T57-65. Legal procedures exhausted. Use free-lance operative. Time Factor: Critical. Message ends.”
       The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “ Special thanks to Jeff Schechtman,” and “The Producers would also like to thank the following for their cooperation: Apollo Computer Inc.--Michael Sciulli, Philip Neale, Steve Reber; Arco Center; Coldwell Banker; Norland Properties; Digital Equipment Corporation; Levocolor-Lorentzen, Inc.; Laser effects by Laser Sound; Technical security advice by Instructional Technology Service; Time Systems, Inc.; Cardkey Systems, Inc.; Carpet by Masland Carpets and Allied Chemical Corporation; Lindsey & Hall, Inc.; National Performance Centers, Inc.; Bayless Stationers, Inglewood, California; National Motorsports; English Leather; Calendar Girls Pageant; Kristina Garan; Heidi Gardner; Lisa Stofflet; George Houraney; Larry Joseph; Jack Scanlon.” End credits also state: “Sculptures and prints in Ryland’s office after the work of Eduardo Paolozzi by kind permission of the artist,” and “Filmed on location in Hollywood.”
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, director Harley Cokliss’ interest in the project dated back to 1983 when he was first offered the script. At the time, his full schedule dictated that he pass on making the film. Later, Cokliss got a second chance when he met producers Douglas Curtis and Joel B. Michaels while working on another New World Pictures film titled The Philadelphia Experiment (1984, see entry), and the men became interested in working together.
       During pre-production, Curtis and Michaels conducted a search lasting several months to find an automobile with the right speed, and sleek, futuristic styling that could be used for filming. At one point, the men were introduced to Norm Marshall, a product placement consultant and car racing-aficionado. When Marshall showed them images of the Concordia II, a concept car built and designed by Montreal, Canada-based Bernard Beaujardin and the students from a mechanical engineering class at Montreal’s Concordia University, which had been on exhibit at the 1982 Montreal Car Expo, they knew they had found the right vehicle. The producers bought Beaujardin’s car, and also had him create a “stunt double” of the car for use during filming.
       Some of the automobile’s unique features included door entry through an electrically-operated sliding roof, stirrups located on each side of the vehicle designed for the same purpose as mounting a horse, pneumatically operated headlight covers, and side steps that facilitated entry. Additionally, the racecar was built without windshield wipers because the glass’s nearly horizontal position allowed rainwater to disperse once it was in motion.
       A 21 Feb 1985 HR brief announced that principal photography began that day and entire picture would be filmed at Lion’s Gate Studios in Southern CA.
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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
21 Feb 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jan 1986
p. 3, 40.
Los Angeles Times
10 Jan 1986
p. 14.
New York Times
10 Jan 1986
p. 8.
Variety
15 Jan 1986
p. 23.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
New World Pictures Presents
A Douglas Curtis and Joel B. Michaels Production
A Harley Cokliss Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
3d asst dir
PRODUCERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
Gaffer
Key grip
Key grip
Still photog
Best boy elec
Best boy elec
Elec
Best boy grip
2d asst cam
Rigging gaffer
Cam loader
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Spec prop des/Prop master
Asst prop master
Prop asst
Set dec
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Leadman
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Set const
Const coord
Const asst
Const asst
Const asst
COSTUMES
Cost des
Key costumer
Ward asst
MUSIC
Add arr performed by
Add arr performed by
Asst mus ed
Mus supv
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd mixer
Boom op
Sd eff ed
Dial ed
Foley ed
Sd eng
Foley artist
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec visual eff
Spec eff coord
Spec eff coord
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff props/Electronics
Visual eff cam
Visual eff 2d cam
Opt supv
Printer op
Printer op
Spec rigging
Spec rigging
Miniatures by
Title & opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup & hair des
Asst makeup & hair
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod coord
Prod accountant
Loc mgr
Scr supv
Prod secy
Assoc casting dir
Asst auditor
Asst loc mgr
Consultant
Transportation consultant
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Prod van driver
Honeywagon driver
Black moon mechanic
Black moon mechanic
Asst to Tommy Lee Jones
Asst to Harley Cokliss
Craft service
Catering
Catering, Cinema Catering
Catering, Cinema Catering
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Unit pub
Voice casting
Insurance
Insurance
Completion guarantor
Completion guarantor, The Completion Bond Company
Video playback
Cam systems by
Motorhomes by
Motorhomes by, Florian Enterprises
Motorhomes by, Florian Enterprises
Black Moon des and built by
in association with the University of Concordia, Montreal, Canada
STAND INS
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt coord & Black Moon driver
ANIMATION
Anim cam
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
Eastman col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Sleeping With The Enemy," written by Chari Brandon and Jack Littlejohn, performed by Chari Brandon.
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 January 1986
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 10 January 1986
Production Date:
began 21 February 1985 in So. California
Copyright Claimant:
Balcor Film Investors
Copyright Date:
5 February 1986
Copyright Number:
PA279137
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
100
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

A thief named Quint barely escapes after being hired to steal computerized documents containing tax records from the Lucky Dollar Corporation, a Las Vegas, Nevada, accounting firm under investigation by a Grand Jury. At a gas station in the desert, Quint admires a futuristic "Black Moon" sports car being towed on a flat bed trailer by owner, Earl Windom, and his associates, Billy Lyons and Tyke Thayden. He hides the stolen computer cassette in a rear compartment of the vehicle. After the travelers leave, the accounting firm’s security team arrives, and leader, Marvin Ringer, demands Quint return the tax records. However, Quint evades the men, and later meets an agent from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), who also demands the cassette. Instead, Quint wants double his original asking price and a passport out of the country, and assures the agent that he will have the information before the next court hearing. He arranges for the handoff to take place at the Betsy Club in Hollywood, California, the Black Moon’s destination. In the Betsy’s parking garage, Earl Windom, the car's designer, explains the sports car’s finer points to a prospective auto manufacturer, and they continue the meeting inside the club. Soon, Quint arrives and is unable to open the car’s rear compartment. Meanwhile, an attractive club patron named Nina arranges for several high-end automobiles, including the Black Moon, to be stolen from the garage. Quint chases Nina as she drives the Black Moon. When she loads the sports car onto a transport truck, he follows her to the Ryland Towers parking garage in downtown Los Angeles. However, the truck disappears behind a false concrete wall, while Mr. Ryland ... +


A thief named Quint barely escapes after being hired to steal computerized documents containing tax records from the Lucky Dollar Corporation, a Las Vegas, Nevada, accounting firm under investigation by a Grand Jury. At a gas station in the desert, Quint admires a futuristic "Black Moon" sports car being towed on a flat bed trailer by owner, Earl Windom, and his associates, Billy Lyons and Tyke Thayden. He hides the stolen computer cassette in a rear compartment of the vehicle. After the travelers leave, the accounting firm’s security team arrives, and leader, Marvin Ringer, demands Quint return the tax records. However, Quint evades the men, and later meets an agent from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), who also demands the cassette. Instead, Quint wants double his original asking price and a passport out of the country, and assures the agent that he will have the information before the next court hearing. He arranges for the handoff to take place at the Betsy Club in Hollywood, California, the Black Moon’s destination. In the Betsy’s parking garage, Earl Windom, the car's designer, explains the sports car’s finer points to a prospective auto manufacturer, and they continue the meeting inside the club. Soon, Quint arrives and is unable to open the car’s rear compartment. Meanwhile, an attractive club patron named Nina arranges for several high-end automobiles, including the Black Moon, to be stolen from the garage. Quint chases Nina as she drives the Black Moon. When she loads the sports car onto a transport truck, he follows her to the Ryland Towers parking garage in downtown Los Angeles. However, the truck disappears behind a false concrete wall, while Mr. Ryland watches on a closed circuit monitor as Quint inspects a small trail of oil on the ground near the wall. Quint returns to the Betsy, meets the FBI agent, and explains the cassette has been stolen. The agent gives him three days to find it. Quint approaches Earl Windom to cut a deal for the return of the Black Moon, but Earl rejects his offer. Meanwhile, Quint meets with “Iron John,” a contractor friend, to uncover Ryland Towers’ blueprints. Back at the Towers, Nina informs Ryland that she plans to keep the Black Moon for her own use. Although she believes that she evaded Quint, Ryland tells her that she was followed. When Ryland complains that Black Moon is too conspicuous, Nina relinquishes control of the car. Across the street, Quint begins surveillance, and follows Nina to an industrial warehouse. There, she switches cars, and he follows her to a nightclub. When she leaves, he hitches a ride with her. They chat about cars, and Quint explains that a special car belonging to some friends was stolen, and they want it returned. He asks Nina if she has any ideas how to make it happen. They spend the night at Nina’s apartment and make love. Later, Quint tells Nina that they have a lot in common because they are both thieves. When Nina asks why she should help him, Quint kisses her. Back at the Towers, Earl, Billy and Tyke sneak in to reclaim the Black Moon. However, Tyke is run over by a Ryland lackey. After the murder, Earl seeks out Quint, and together they visit Emile French, a security systems specialist and consultant for the alarm systems at the Towers. Emile tells them that Ryland Towers is a fortress. Later, Quint finds Iron John dead, then Marvin Ringer and two cohorts ambush and severely beat him. He reaches underneath his rental car and retrieves two guns, and seemingly kills Marvin and his associates. Quint is so injured, however, that he zigzags across the road as he drives back to town. He returns to Nina’s apartment, and she cleans his wounds. At Emile’s office, Earl learns how to disable the Towers’ alarm system. Quint arrives with true Tower blueprints, and explains a plan to use an adjacent, unfinished, and largely security-free Tower as his way to gain access to the roof of Ryland Tower. Then, he can give Earl and Billy access to the Tower building. Nina meets Ryland, and he shows her a surveillance video of Quint in the Tower garage on the night that he followed her. When Nina denies knowing Quint, Ryland shows her another video of her and Quint making love. Feeling betrayed, Ryland instructs an associate to beat her. Quint, Earl and Billy load their equipment and begin their break in. Quint knocks a guard unconscious, while Earl and Billy cut wires in alarm boxes. Quint traverses to the Tower roof after launching a cable from the adjacent building. Although weak from his injuries, Quint enters the Tower building, and climbs through air ducts. Billy introduces a decoy tape of the parking garage into the closed circuit television monitor, and they continue their mission. Quint rescues Nina, then knocks out some guards, and changes into one of their security uniforms. Nina leads him to the cage where the Black Moon is kept, but a heavy chain and lock must be picked before they have access to the vehicle. As Linda and Quint drive the Black Moon, they evade security guards and race toward the fake wall. As Earl detonates the false concrete wall in the Tower garage, jail bars descend to block escape. Quint steps on the vehicle’s brakes and avoids a crash. He turns the car around looking for another way out. Quint, Nina, and the car become trapped in a freight elevator controlled by Ryland. As they drive onto an automotive showroom floor with other cars, Ryland compliments their efforts, but says it is time to surrender. Instead, Nina pops up through the roof and shoots members of Ryland’s security team. Back inside the car, Quint runs over Ryland and accelerates. The Black Moon crashes through both Tower windows and the windows of the adjacent building and lands safely. Once Quint retrieves his cassette, he must fend off Marvin and his henchmen. FBI agents appear, rescue Nina, and watch as Quint and Marvin engage in hand-to-hand combat. Quint beats Marvin, grabs the cassette and tosses it to FBI agents. In turn, Quint receives his payment, and they return to Nina’s apartment. There, he and Nina make love, but his injuries hamper his ability to complete the act. Nina laughs and advises him to rest.

+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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