Club Paradise (1986)

PG-13 | 95 mins | Comedy | 11 July 1986

Directors:

Harold Ramis, Carl Barth

Producer:

Michael Shamberg

Cinematographer:

Peter Hannan

Editor:

Marion Rothman

Production Designer:

John Graysmark

Production Company:

Warner Bros., Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

       A Jul 1986 Playboy article written by David Standish, who received a story credit on the movie, described how a miserable Club Med vacation with friend, Chris Miller, in 1979 became the genesis for their screenplay titled, Club Sandwich. Miller previously worked with writer Douglas Kenney and actor-screenwriter-director Harold Ramis on National Lampoon’s Animal House (1978, see entry). Although, Miller’s Dartmouth College student life provided inspiration for the picture, it was Ramis who organized Miller’s experiences into a cohesive framework. As Standish and Miller moved forward with their idea, they knew that the production company comprised of producer Michael Shamberg, executive producer Alan Greisman, and Kenney, were interested in finding properties to sell to Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
       However, the writers discovered it was difficult to focus their creativity. After a year of rewrites, studio executives were underwhelmed with their screenplay filled with eclectic characters including a gold-chain wearing “Sol the Shark,” based on the actual animal from Jaws (1975, see entry), a samurai warrior caught in a time warp and transported to contemporary life, sixties-era dope dealers, and an alien from outer space. Kenny suggested the team drop the alien from the story, then in Aug 1980, Kenney died unexpectedly in an accidental fall in Kauai, HI. According to Standish, Miller deeply felt Kenney’s loss. The writers soldiered on until fall 1980, submitting a second draft. Studio executives decided the script lacked the necessary realism, and hired a new team of writers to work on two additional drafts.
       Later, the number expanded to six writers, producing six drafts in six years. Production notes in AMPAS library files ... More Less

       A Jul 1986 Playboy article written by David Standish, who received a story credit on the movie, described how a miserable Club Med vacation with friend, Chris Miller, in 1979 became the genesis for their screenplay titled, Club Sandwich. Miller previously worked with writer Douglas Kenney and actor-screenwriter-director Harold Ramis on National Lampoon’s Animal House (1978, see entry). Although, Miller’s Dartmouth College student life provided inspiration for the picture, it was Ramis who organized Miller’s experiences into a cohesive framework. As Standish and Miller moved forward with their idea, they knew that the production company comprised of producer Michael Shamberg, executive producer Alan Greisman, and Kenney, were interested in finding properties to sell to Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
       However, the writers discovered it was difficult to focus their creativity. After a year of rewrites, studio executives were underwhelmed with their screenplay filled with eclectic characters including a gold-chain wearing “Sol the Shark,” based on the actual animal from Jaws (1975, see entry), a samurai warrior caught in a time warp and transported to contemporary life, sixties-era dope dealers, and an alien from outer space. Kenny suggested the team drop the alien from the story, then in Aug 1980, Kenney died unexpectedly in an accidental fall in Kauai, HI. According to Standish, Miller deeply felt Kenney’s loss. The writers soldiered on until fall 1980, submitting a second draft. Studio executives decided the script lacked the necessary realism, and hired a new team of writers to work on two additional drafts.
       Later, the number expanded to six writers, producing six drafts in six years. Production notes in AMPAS library files stated that Ramis was responsible for the addition of actor Peter O’Toole’s character, “Governor Anthony Croyden Hayes,” a combination of British colonialism mixed with American tourism. The Playboy article stated that in Mar 1985, Ramis sent Standish and Miller copies of the final screenplay. An enclosed note invited Standish to visit the set on location in Jamaica. Standish claimed the invitation was, in part, based on his association with Ramis. They shared an office when they were both “Party Jokes” editors on staff at Playboy magazine.
       A 31 Aug 1983 Var news item announced that actors, Bill Murray and John Cleese, would star in a Caribbean-based comedy formerly known as Club Sandwich. According to a 19 Dec 1984 LAT brief, Murray decided to take a six-month hiatus from film after his work in Ghostbusters (1984, see entry) and Razor’s Edge (1984, see entry), and dropped out of the project. Actors Robin Williams and Peter O’Toole were hired to replace Murray, and the picture was retitled, Island Jack.
       A 23 Apr 1985 HR production chart announced that principal photography began in Jamaica on 22 Apr 1985. The Playboy article reported that the film’s budget was $19 million. According to a 24 Jul 1985 Var brief, the production spent ten weeks on location in Jamaica before completing principal photography at The Burbank Studios in Los Angeles. Production notes stated Ramis shot the picture’s opening title sequence over four days at the studio.
       According to the Playboy article, an ample warehouse in Port Antonio, Jamaica, was converted into “a carpentry shop” that was used to build the beach resort seen in the film. A British crew was hired because it was more cost effective than hiring an American crew.        Stunt man Bill Morrisey wore a dark wig to stand-in for actress Andrea Martin during a sequence in which she gets tangled in broken rope while parasailing.
       Actor Adolph Caesar died 6 Mar 1986 of a heart attack while working on Tough Guys (1986, see entry) before the release of Club Paradise on 11 Jul 1968.

      End credits state: “Filmed on location in Jamaica, Chicago and Los Angeles.” The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “With special thanks to: The Jamaican Government, The People of Jamaica and The Town of Port Antonio, The Film Office of the J. N. I. P., and Sally Porteous.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
23 Apr 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jul 1986
p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
19 Dec 1984.
---
Los Angeles Times
11 Jul 1986
p. 1, 14.
New York Times
11 Jul 1986
p. 8.
Playboy
Jul 1986
p. 104, 126, 152-4, 157.
Variety
31 Aug 1983.
---
Variety
24 Jul 1985.
---
Variety
9 Jul 1986
p. 18.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
co-starring:
[and]
Friends & rebels:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Warner Bros. presents
a Michael Shamberg production
a Harold Ramis film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir, Jamaican crew
Unit prod mgr, U. S. crew
1st asst dir, U. S. crew
2d asst dir, U. S. crew
Dir, Chicago 2d unit
1st asst dir, Chicago 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Cam op
Clapper loader
2d unit cam op
2d unit focus
2d unit grip
2d unit clapper loader
Gaffer
Best boy
Still photog
Cameras by
Cam op, U. S. crew
Dir of photog, Chicago 2d unit
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Art dir, U. S. crew
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
Ed asst, Jamaican crew
Asst ed, U. S. crew
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Const mgr
Prop master
Prop buyer
Standby prop
Standby prop
Const buyer
H. O. D. carpenter
H. O. D. plasterer
H. O. D. painter
H. O. D. rigger
Set dec, U. S. crew
Prop master, U. S. crew
Const coord, U. S. crew
COSTUMES
Ward supv
Ward asst
Ward asst
Fashion consultant
Ward asst, Jamaican crew
Ward asst, Jamaican crew
Men's costumer, U. S. crew
Women's costumer, U. S. crew
MUSIC
Mus comp
Mus comp
SOUND
Boom op
Sd tech
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
ADR ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd asst, Jamaican crew
Sd mixer, U. S. crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Spec eff asst
Title des
Spec eff coord, U. S. crew
Spec eff foreman, U. S. crew
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Makeup artist, U. S. crew
Hairstylist, U. S. crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Asst to Mr. Ramis and Mr. Shamberg
Pub
Prod coord
Loc mgr
Transport mgr
Prod accountant
Loc accountant
Asst accountant
Post prod asst
Loc secy
Secy to the prod
London contact
Military adv
U. S. Army
Catering by
Asst loc mgr, Jamaican crew
Asst loc mgr, Jamaican crew
Prod asst, Jamaican crew
Boat master, Jamaican crew
Casting asst, Jamaican crew
Accounts asst, Jamaican crew
Accounts asst, Jamaican crew
Scr supv, U. S. crew
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Club Paradise,” written and performed by Jimmy Cliff, courtesy of Columbia Records
“American Plan,” written and performed by Jimmy Cliff, courtesy of Columbia Records
“Brightest Star,” written and performed by Jimmy Cliff, courtesy of Columbia Records
+
SONGS
“Club Paradise,” written and performed by Jimmy Cliff, courtesy of Columbia Records
“American Plan,” written and performed by Jimmy Cliff, courtesy of Columbia Records
“Brightest Star,” written and performed by Jimmy Cliff, courtesy of Columbia Records
“The Lion Awakes,” written and performed by Jimmy Cliff, courtesy of Columbia Records
“Third World People,” written and performed by Jimmy Cliff, courtesy of Columbia Records
“You Can’t Keep A Good Man Down,” written and performed by Jimmy Cliff, courtesy of Columbia Records
“Seven-Day Weekend,” performed by Jimmy Cliff & Elvis Costello and The Attractions, produced by Nick Lowe and Colin Fairley, written by Elvis Costello and Jimmy Cliff, courtesy of Columbia Records and Riviera Global Record Productions Ltd.
“Ape Man,” performed by The Kinks, written by Ray Davies, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc., “Grenada,” performed by Mighty Sparrow, written by Francisco Slinger, courtesy of B’s Records
“Guava Jelly,” performed by Owen Grey, written by Bob Marley, courtesy of Island Records
“Three Little Birds,” written by Bob Marley
“Margarita,” performed by Mighty Sparrow, written by Francisco Slinger, courtesy of Charlies Records
“Phillip, My Dear,” performed by Mighty Sparrow, written by Francisco Slinger, courtesy of Charlies Records
“Love People,” performed by Blue Riddim Band, written by A. J. Brown and Michael Cooper, courtesy of CBS Records
“Island In The Sun,” performed by Jimmy Cliff, written by Lord Burgess and Harry Belafonte
“Sweetie Come From America,” written and performed by Well Pleased And Satisfied, courtesy of Disc Pressers Ltd.
“Pipeline,” performed by The Chantays, written by Bob Spickard and Brian Carman, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
“Soldier Take Over,” performed by Yellowman, written by Winston Foster, courtesy of Island Records
“Love Is A Many Splendored Thing,” written by Paul Francis Webber and Sammy Fain
“Gong Rock,” written and performed by Stewart Copeland, courtesy of A & M Records.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Island Jack
Club Sandwich
Release Date:
11 July 1986
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 11 July 1986
Production Date:
22 April--July 1985 in Jamaica and Los Angeles
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros., Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 October 1986
Copyright Number:
PA307731
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo® in selected theaters
Color
Duration(in mins):
95
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28135
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

As a Chicago apartment building burns on a cold winter night, fireman Jack Moniker tells Dave, another fireman, that he is quitting the department. Dave has heard it all before, and does not believe Jack. This time, Jack produces a newspaper advertisement about life on St. Nicholas, a Caribbean island. Jack goes back into the burning building, and encounters a frightened dog. He throws a stick out the window, and the dog is caught below in a net by other firefighters. Jack then stands on the windowsill about to jump when an explosion throws him to the pavement. Fellow firefighters dig him out from under a pile of bricks. Soon, Jack follows his muse and relocates to St. Nicholas, Jamaica. At the bar in the Palms resort, the bartender introduces him to travellers, Capt. Toby Prooth and Phillipa Lloyd, just arrived by sloop from Antigua. Jack also greets former Governor Anthony Croyden Hayes, who does not think much of Americans that become ex-patriots. Jack invites Toby and Phillipa to sample the music at Club Paradise. At the club, Jack flirts with Phillipa, and explains he lives off of insurance money from an on-the-job injury as a fireman. As they talk, Toby is bored, and wants to leave. However, Phillipa chooses to stay, and talk with Jack. They sit at a table with club owner, Ernest Reed, and a few of his friends. Suddenly, Prime Minister Solomon Gundy appears, and alerts Ernest that he has a delinquent tax bill of $6,000, is behind with his food and beverage taxes, has racked up tourist code violations, and allowed the use of marijuana in his club. ... +


As a Chicago apartment building burns on a cold winter night, fireman Jack Moniker tells Dave, another fireman, that he is quitting the department. Dave has heard it all before, and does not believe Jack. This time, Jack produces a newspaper advertisement about life on St. Nicholas, a Caribbean island. Jack goes back into the burning building, and encounters a frightened dog. He throws a stick out the window, and the dog is caught below in a net by other firefighters. Jack then stands on the windowsill about to jump when an explosion throws him to the pavement. Fellow firefighters dig him out from under a pile of bricks. Soon, Jack follows his muse and relocates to St. Nicholas, Jamaica. At the bar in the Palms resort, the bartender introduces him to travellers, Capt. Toby Prooth and Phillipa Lloyd, just arrived by sloop from Antigua. Jack also greets former Governor Anthony Croyden Hayes, who does not think much of Americans that become ex-patriots. Jack invites Toby and Phillipa to sample the music at Club Paradise. At the club, Jack flirts with Phillipa, and explains he lives off of insurance money from an on-the-job injury as a fireman. As they talk, Toby is bored, and wants to leave. However, Phillipa chooses to stay, and talk with Jack. They sit at a table with club owner, Ernest Reed, and a few of his friends. Suddenly, Prime Minister Solomon Gundy appears, and alerts Ernest that he has a delinquent tax bill of $6,000, is behind with his food and beverage taxes, has racked up tourist code violations, and allowed the use of marijuana in his club. Ernest suggests that Gundy’s big business ties want to force him out of business, and he kicks Gundy and his two henchmen off the premises. Gundy warns Ernest that he has two weeks to straighten out his financial affairs. Later, Ernest auditions for Royal St. Nicholas hotel owner, Voit Zerbe, but does not get the job. Zerbe offers to buy Ernest’s property, and relieve his tax problems, but Ernest refuses his proposal. Jack takes Phillipa to visit his tropical cabin, and reveals his plan to become business partners with Ernest. If she stays in Jamaica, Jack would hire her. Phillipa plans to sail with Toby for Martinique, but when Jack offers a job with great perks and benefits, she agrees to stay. Jack creates a seductive advertising campaign with the help of friends. Ernest and Jack wait at a primitive airfield, while an airplane carrying the first group of guests makes a dubious landing. Musicians playing steel drums welcome guests. Meanwhile, Gundy alerts Zerbe that Jack paid Ernest’s tax bill. Zerbe is not overly concerned. He says the chances are great that Jack and Ernest will not be able to keep their business running. Soon, Jack discovers that one guest, Terry Hamlin, is a travel writer for the New York Times. On the beach, friends Barry Nye and Barry Steinberg eye potential girl friends while guest Linda White discovers her cabin has no running water, is stocked with towels stolen from other hotels, and has no air conditioning or complimentary toiletries. Her husband, Randy, realizes the brochure photograph of their room was doctored to look bigger. When Linda and Randy complain they must share a bathroom with the guest next door, Jack promises to fix the problem. Linda turns her attention to parasailing, and asks staff members to give her a lesson. Later, Jack spends his time smoothing over problems. Ernest must be persuaded to perform in a glitzy costume, the cook is appalled that a kitchen helper has dreadlocks down to his backside, and Jack finds a chef’s hat that will keep the hair away from food. Soon, Gundy says that all his legal efforts to sabotage Club Paradise have failed. Zerbe suggests Gundy should use whatever means necessary. Linda takes a shower after her exhilarating lesson, and the water now flows like a monsoon. At night, Governor Hayes stops by to assess Jack’s “nipple ranch.” Jack offers double drinks on the house if the governor will charm Terry and give her travel article a positive spin. As the two Barrys mingle with some women, one asks if the men have anything to smoke. The men arrange for a taxicab driver to take them to an unknown location to buy some farm-fresh marijuana. They are only able to score one marijuana cigarette, which several guests smoke until it is gone before the Barrys have a chance to partake. Meanwhile, the governor informs Jack that Gundy and Zerbe have bribed him to convince Jack and Ernest to sell their ownership. It seems that an anonymous developer is prepared to buy the entire island, only Jack and Ernest stand in the way of the deal. Governor Hayes hints that a certain yacht in the harbor might hold clues, and if Jack were to gather intelligence it would be appreciated. Later, Jack and Ernest sneak aboard the vessel and discover a 3D architectural model, showing redevelopment plans for St. Nicholas, including high rise hotels and upscale condominiums. However, Jack and Ernest are caught trespassing, and thrown in jail. The next day, Gundy releases the partners, but gives them until the evening to sell the club and resort. When too many guests decide to go topless on the beach, Jack arranges a spontaneous excursion to a beach called “Devil’s Hole,” where nude sunbathing is allowed. Local youths decide to have some fun, and hide the guests’ clothing. The group assembles palm frond outfits so they can hike their way back to the hotel. Along the way, Linda is almost choked and eaten by a large snake, but escapes. Jack cannot seem to find anyone, and the bartender alerts him that Barry has gone missing on a parasail. With so many things going wrong, Jack starts to think he should sell and cut his losses, but Phillipa convinces him not to give up hope. Soon, Jack’s nude sunbathers find their way to the St. Nicholas resort hotel. Linda discovers the casino, and will not leave until her husband drags her away. Back at Club Paradise, Barry finds a huge bag of marijuana in his room, and panics in fear he will be arrested before he can smoke it all. Jack tries stalling Gundy once more, but Gundy runs out of patience. The police chase after Jack and Ernest. Barry thinks the police are after him, and runs into the forest to hide a portion of his marijuana. Without capturing Jack and Ernest to force their hand, Gundy and Zerbe assure their client that a deal is close at hand. Meanwhile, Gundy summons the militia to capture Ernest, who organizes a group of rebels to fight Gundy and his interests. Jack keeps a fireman’s hose around, and sprays the militiamen. The conflict moves to the beach, and the governor arrives with his own ragtag force, comprised of local residents. When the governor says he intends to shoot Gundy, Jack points out that the yacht has left the harbor and Gundy’s deal is now cold. Jack and Ernest congratulate the governor for restoring order.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.