In the Shadow of Kilimanjaro (1986)

R | 97 mins | Adventure, Horror | 9 May 1986

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HISTORY


       News items in the 21 Dec 1983 HR and 29 Dec 1983 DV announced that principal photography on the $8 million-film would begin 16 Jan 1984 on the Masai Amboseli Game Preserve (now known as Amboseli National Park) in Kenya, Africa.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, animal trainer Clint Rowe worked with three principal baboons for five months prior to the start of principal photography. In Kenya, filmmakers worked with Masai inhabitants to round up hundreds of other baboons by using nets, females to lure additional animals, and coaxing others with salt and food. Despite the use of electric fences, forty or fifty animals would typically steal away to their natural habitat after filming certain sequences.
       Although the story took place in a time of drought, the region had recovered sufficiently and second unit crew members went to the desert to get footage of arid land. Due to the remoteness of location shooting, there was reportedly only one telephone line available and film was sent to London, England, to be processed.
       A 18 Feb 1984 Screen International news item stated that injuries were sustained by transportation co-captain Samson Olu Landatu, second assistant director Hope Goodwin and director Raju Patel when the Range Rover in which they were traveling swerved to avoid hitting a giraffe. The vehicle “rolled over three times” near the Kenyan/Tanzanian border, close to Namanga, Kenya, and Goodwin and Patel were later transported to a hospital in Nairobi, Kenya, and discharged after three days. Landatu and Goodwin do not appear in onscreen credits.
      Opening credits state: “Based on a true story.” The ... More Less


       News items in the 21 Dec 1983 HR and 29 Dec 1983 DV announced that principal photography on the $8 million-film would begin 16 Jan 1984 on the Masai Amboseli Game Preserve (now known as Amboseli National Park) in Kenya, Africa.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, animal trainer Clint Rowe worked with three principal baboons for five months prior to the start of principal photography. In Kenya, filmmakers worked with Masai inhabitants to round up hundreds of other baboons by using nets, females to lure additional animals, and coaxing others with salt and food. Despite the use of electric fences, forty or fifty animals would typically steal away to their natural habitat after filming certain sequences.
       Although the story took place in a time of drought, the region had recovered sufficiently and second unit crew members went to the desert to get footage of arid land. Due to the remoteness of location shooting, there was reportedly only one telephone line available and film was sent to London, England, to be processed.
       A 18 Feb 1984 Screen International news item stated that injuries were sustained by transportation co-captain Samson Olu Landatu, second assistant director Hope Goodwin and director Raju Patel when the Range Rover in which they were traveling swerved to avoid hitting a giraffe. The vehicle “rolled over three times” near the Kenyan/Tanzanian border, close to Namanga, Kenya, and Goodwin and Patel were later transported to a hospital in Nairobi, Kenya, and discharged after three days. Landatu and Goodwin do not appear in onscreen credits.
      Opening credits state: “Based on a true story.” The following written epilogue appears before end credits: “The film you have just seen is a fictionalized account of a true incident which took place in Africa during the serious drought in 1984; The Producers wish to make it known that not a single animal was mistreated during the making of this motion picture; On completion of filming the Baboons were rehabilitated to their natural surroundings; The Baboons were captured under the supervision of the Kenyan Ministry of Tourism and Wildlife from the areas where they had been a nuisance to the local population.” End credits also state: “ In the Shadow of Kilimanjaro filmed entirely on location in Kenya.”

              The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “The Producers wish to thank the following for their generous co-operation, advice and support in the making of this picture: “Ministry of Wildlife & Tourism, Government of Kenya; Film Corporation of Kenya; Kenya Society of Prevention of Cruelty to Animals; and Mr. John Keen, Namanga River Lodge.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
LOCATION
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Dec 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Dec 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 May 1986
p. 18.
Los Angeles Times
9 May 1986
Section J, p. 25.
New York Times
9 May 1986
p. 5.
Screen International
18 Feb 1984.
---
Variety
7 May 1986
p. 514.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Sharad Patel presents
An Intermedia Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Dir, 2d unit Kenya
Dir, 2d unit Los Angeles
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod, 2d unit Los Angeles
Assoc prod, 2d unit Los Angeles
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Asst grip
Stills
Video unit asst
Video unit asst
Lighting gaffer
Best boy
Best boy
Key grip
1st asst cam, 2d unit Kenya
2d asst cam, 2d unit Kenya
Addl photog, 2d unit Kenya
Addl photog, 2d unit Kenya
Cam, 2d unit Los Angeles
Gaffer, 2d unit Los Angeles
1st asst cam, 2d unit Los Angeles
Steadicam op, 2d unit Los Angeles
Grip, 2d unit Los Angeles
Grip, 2d unit Los Angeles
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Supv ed
Asst ed
1st asst ed, 2d unit Los Angeles
SET DECORATORS
Const coord
Key carpenter
Prop master
Set dresser
COSTUMES
Costumer
Asst costumer
Ward, 2d unit Los Angeles
SOUND
Boom op
Dubbing ed
Asst dubbing ed
Foley artist, 2d unit Los Angeles
Dolby stereo consultant
Dubbing & re-rec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec visual eff
Spec visual eff
Spec visual eff
Spec eff cam, 2d unit Kenya
Spec mechanical eff, 2d unit Los Angeles
Spec mechanical eff, 2d unit Los Angeles
Titles and spec eff opticals by
Titles and spec eff opticals by
Titles and spec eff opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Animal training
Exec in charge of prod
Exec in charge of prod
Exec in charge of prod
Chief animal veterinarian, Dept. of Wildlife & Con
Financial controller
Prod controller
Dial coach
Unit nurse
Loc mgr
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Kenya, Animal trainer
Kenya, Animal trainer
Kenya, Animal trainer
Kenya, Animal trainer
Kenya, Animal trainer
Kenya, Animal trainer
Kenya, Animal trainer
Kenya, Animal trainer
Kenya, Animal trainer
Kenya, Animal trainer
Addl animals supplied by
Baboon voices created by
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Prod coord L. A.
Prod secy/Casting
Prod's asst
Prod's asst
Prod's asst
Prod accountant
Prod accountant
Asst to dir, 2d unit Los Angeles
Prod asst, 2d unit Los Angeles
Prod asst, 2d unit Los Angeles
Animals provided by, 2d unit Los Angeles
Mola boy, 2d unit Los Angeles
Spec thanks to, 2d unit Los Angeles
Prod services supplied by
Prod equip supplied by
International sales consultant
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
SONGS
"In The Shadow Of Kilimanjaro," by Allan Smallwood & Chieli Minuci.
DETAILS
Release Date:
9 May 1986
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 9 May 1986
Production Date:
began 16 January 1984
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Processed at Technicolor Laboratories, London, England
Duration(in mins):
97
MPAA Rating:
R
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1978, Kenyan wildlife conservation station ranger, Jack Ringtree, vaccinates a rhinoceros in the bush and finds an orphaned girl. He takes her to the teacher at a one-room schoolhouse, and explains that the girl’s mother was attacked and killed by wild animals. The teacher offers to help return the girl to her village. Workers at the Sinya Mine tell owner, Chris Tucker, that the drought is impairing their ability to meet their quotas. Tucker orders his men to start a thirty-year-old boiler. Jack Ringtree arrives, and warns Tucker that predatory animals might attack his crew. He suggests that Tucker shut down operations. Tucker retorts that he has fifty-one days left to reach his quota on his government contract. If he and his men leave they will forfeit too much money. Jack asks for some of Tucker’s water supply to keep the wild animals alive, but Tucker drilled three-hundred feet just to find water and is not about to give it away. Jack threatens to call the commissioner, but Tucker stands his ground. Soon, the boiler’s pressure skyrockets as its valves become stuck. Workers scatter as the boiler explodes. Jack’s wife, Lee Ringtree, arrives at his hotel after carrying her own luggage from the bus. Ginny Hansen, the hotel proprietor, shows her to the room, and warns of a water shortage. Later, Jack returns to his room, strips off his dusty clothing, presents his wife with a bouquet, and makes love to her. In the morning, Lee tells Jack she wants a divorce, and pleads with him to return to America. He tells her he loves her, and gives her an African-beaded necklace. He would ... +


In 1978, Kenyan wildlife conservation station ranger, Jack Ringtree, vaccinates a rhinoceros in the bush and finds an orphaned girl. He takes her to the teacher at a one-room schoolhouse, and explains that the girl’s mother was attacked and killed by wild animals. The teacher offers to help return the girl to her village. Workers at the Sinya Mine tell owner, Chris Tucker, that the drought is impairing their ability to meet their quotas. Tucker orders his men to start a thirty-year-old boiler. Jack Ringtree arrives, and warns Tucker that predatory animals might attack his crew. He suggests that Tucker shut down operations. Tucker retorts that he has fifty-one days left to reach his quota on his government contract. If he and his men leave they will forfeit too much money. Jack asks for some of Tucker’s water supply to keep the wild animals alive, but Tucker drilled three-hundred feet just to find water and is not about to give it away. Jack threatens to call the commissioner, but Tucker stands his ground. Soon, the boiler’s pressure skyrockets as its valves become stuck. Workers scatter as the boiler explodes. Jack’s wife, Lee Ringtree, arrives at his hotel after carrying her own luggage from the bus. Ginny Hansen, the hotel proprietor, shows her to the room, and warns of a water shortage. Later, Jack returns to his room, strips off his dusty clothing, presents his wife with a bouquet, and makes love to her. In the morning, Lee tells Jack she wants a divorce, and pleads with him to return to America. He tells her he loves her, and gives her an African-beaded necklace. He would like her to remain in Kenya, but she is only interested in staying together back home. In the bush, Claud Gagnon, a Sinya miner, stops to change a flat tire. He retreats to his truck as a pack of baboons attack. They break the truck windows, kill him and feed on his dead body. Jack introduces Lee to the animals he has rescued at his wildlife conservation compound. Soon, he is called away to investigate a missing child, and tells Lee not to leave the area. Tucker and his miners discover Claud’s mauled body in his truck. Jack organizes a search party to look for the missing boy, and soon, he and the villagers find a single bloodied arm. Jack tells District Officer Tshombe that baboons not lions are attacking humans. While other animals might migrate to find food, baboons remain in their territory and will eat each other if necessary. When Jack suggests that Tshombe evacuate the community, the officer refuses. Chris Tucker appears, and suggests that he and his men fight the primates. Jack reminds Tucker that there are 90,000 baboons in the wild, and it is a criminal act to kill animals living on a wildlife preserve. After Jack leaves, Tucker tells Tshombe that he lost one of his men to the baboons, and suggests that they kill some of the dominant males so that the other baboons have something to eat. He gathers a hunting party, and Jack reluctantly joins the hunt and documents the killings with his camera. To Tucker’s dismay, instead of leaving the carcasses for other baboons to feed, villagers load up the truck to take much of the meat back home. Jack goes to Nairobi to make a formal request to evacuate the community. A government official responds that baboon attacks are happening all over Kenya, and there is no place to relocate villagers. Jack shows the official his photographs to demonstrate that the animals have organized in packs to kill humans not each other, normal behavior in drought conditions. The official does not grasp the urgency of the situation, and tells Jack things will return to normal as soon as the rains come. As Tucker and his miners work to restore the boiler, miner Eugene Kurtz notices several packs of baboons in the distance. Tucker orders his men into their trucks as the baboons attack. At the wildlife station, Lee is attacked during a walk, and barely avoids being mauled when she hides in a building. Jack shoots several baboons on his timely return. The next day, Tucker and his miners reinforce the truck windows with steel wire, and drive with Jack to rescue a broken-down supply truck. A baboon hidden in a small prop plane attacks Tshombe as he transports Claud Gagnon’s widow, Lucille, to the airport. Tshombe is killed and the plane crashes into a mountain, killing Lucille. Jack sees that the baboons have taken most of the food supplies. Suddenly, baboons attack the supply truck, while Tucker and his miners watch from the safety of their vehicle. Later, Tucker returns to the hotel and tells Lee that Jack is dead. When he informs Ginny that they were not able to recover supplies, she asks about the truck’s refrigerated meat locker. Tucker and his men race back to the supply truck. Jack crawls out of the meat locker where he was hiding, opens a can of food and distributes it among the baboons. He grabs his rifle, and escapes to an abandoned bus nearby. At the schoolhouse, the teacher orders students to hide when baboons attack the building. Tucker finds Jack, who drives the bus and follows Tucker to the schoolhouse. The men evacuate the students, and bring them to the hotel. Lee is overjoyed to see Jack alive. Soon, the men are called to a baboon attack at a nearby village. They are too late to save anyone, but close off a building with baboons inside and set it on fire. That night, baboons surround the hotel, crowded with villagers, children, hotel guests, and miners. The power goes out, forcing the men to patrol with flashlights and candles. Jack and Tucker search for the teacher when she goes missing. The teacher is mauled to death and a large male baboon wounds Tucker. However, the morning brings the rain. Tucker is eager to finish his mining contract, and orders his men into the truck. Lee tells her husband she will stay in Kenya a little longer. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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