Little Shop of Horrors (1986)

PG-13 | 94 mins | Musical comedy, Horror | 19 December 1986

Director:

Frank Oz

Writer:

Howard Ashman

Producer:

David Geffen

Cinematographer:

Robert Paynter

Editor:

John Jympson

Production Designer:

Roy Walker

Production Company:

Geffen Film Company
Full page view
HISTORY

       According to news items in the 29 Apr 1983 DV and 10 Aug 1983 Var, producer David Geffen, Steven Spielberg, and director Martin Scorsese planned to team up for a $3 million 3-D “filmusical” through Warner Bros. Pictures, which purchased the film rights for $500,000.
       A 16 Oct 1985 Var brief announced that principal photography would begin 21 Oct 1985 in London, England. A 14 Mar 1986 HR article stated that the film’s budget was $18 million. A 28 Jun 1986 Screen International news item reported that principal photography was completed 23 Jun 1986, after a three-month delay and fifty percent budget overrun. Due to the delays, the 2 Jul 1986 release was moved back to Christmas of that year. Articles in the 22 Sep 1986 New York and 5 Oct 1986 LAT revealed two reasons why director Frank Oz returned to London in the fall of 1986 to re-shoot a new ending for the film. In the first version, audiences at test screenings were opposed to a downbeat conclusion in which the plant devoured the cast. In the second version, David Geffen claimed there was talk about doing a sequel, which would not be possible if the hero was killed.
       As reported in a 5 Jan 1987 LAT article and production notes in AMPAS library files, “Audrey II” designer Lyle Conway said his inspiration for the puppet plant was based on various cacti seen in botanical gardens such as London’s Kew Gardens and flower shops that could be described as both “delicate and exotic.” He wanted his design ... More Less

       According to news items in the 29 Apr 1983 DV and 10 Aug 1983 Var, producer David Geffen, Steven Spielberg, and director Martin Scorsese planned to team up for a $3 million 3-D “filmusical” through Warner Bros. Pictures, which purchased the film rights for $500,000.
       A 16 Oct 1985 Var brief announced that principal photography would begin 21 Oct 1985 in London, England. A 14 Mar 1986 HR article stated that the film’s budget was $18 million. A 28 Jun 1986 Screen International news item reported that principal photography was completed 23 Jun 1986, after a three-month delay and fifty percent budget overrun. Due to the delays, the 2 Jul 1986 release was moved back to Christmas of that year. Articles in the 22 Sep 1986 New York and 5 Oct 1986 LAT revealed two reasons why director Frank Oz returned to London in the fall of 1986 to re-shoot a new ending for the film. In the first version, audiences at test screenings were opposed to a downbeat conclusion in which the plant devoured the cast. In the second version, David Geffen claimed there was talk about doing a sequel, which would not be possible if the hero was killed.
       As reported in a 5 Jan 1987 LAT article and production notes in AMPAS library files, “Audrey II” designer Lyle Conway said his inspiration for the puppet plant was based on various cacti seen in botanical gardens such as London’s Kew Gardens and flower shops that could be described as both “delicate and exotic.” He wanted his design to be a cross between Ukrainian Easter eggs and the cacti. Conway also consulted with scientists at the Atomic Energy Authority in Harwell, England, on how to build the armatures that would support an animatronic model weighing more than a ton and stand at a height of twelve-and-a-half feet.
       In all, Conway created seven animatronic stages to show the growth of the plant from a small bud to a six-foot wide, seven-foot deep, man-eating plant. The initial effects involved four technicians with radio controls and simple cables. As Audrey II grew, up to fifty technicians were needed to synchronize the plant’s movement to recorded music. The plant swayed through a combination of cables and hydraulic pumps and levers. Four puppeteers, each in charge of eight cables, rehearsed for three months to master the lip synching necessary to coordinate the plant’s lip movements with the pre-recorded songs by Leon Stubbs. Audrey II’s finale, the “Mean Green Mother From Outer Space” number, appeared as a four-minute sequence in the film but took five weeks to film. Materials used for the plant’s exterior included latex, plastic and silk. In the largest model, a new formula for “wrinkle-free foam rubber” was used. Also, the vines that spear walls and dial a payphone were almost eight-feet long and an inch and a half at their widest. Puppeteers comfortably maneuvered them with cables. Production notes state that Conway employed several hundred gallons of KY Jelly, 15,000 handmade leaves, 2,000 feet of vine, and eleven-and-a-half miles of cable to bring Audrey II to life.
       A 10 Apr 1987 Back Stage article stated that Peter Wallach, in charge of special visual effects, graphics and animation for Associates & Ferren, led a team of eight to create the electricity that traveled through the plant when Seymour fought it with an exposed live wire. Final coloring and effects were completed at Optical Houseouse, which is not credited onscreen. Production notes state that the production designer used every inch of the “007 Stage” at Pinewood Studios to create a “fantasy Skid Row.” Set decorator Tessa Davies collected 1960s-era street signs, gas meters, doorknobs, soapboxes, authentic trashcans, and hundreds of additional props to fill the set.
       The film received two Academy Award nominations: Original Song (“Mean Green Mother From Outer Space”) and Visual Effects (Lyle Conway, Bran Ferren, and Martin Gutteridge). The picture also received two Golden Globe nominations for Best Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical and Best Original Score – Motion Picture.
       Despite largely positive reception and the story's altered ending, Warner Bros. did not follow through with a sequel. On 3 May 2012, HR announced that Joseph Gordon-Levitt planned to develop and star in a remake of the film musical for Warner Bros., with producer Marc Platt and Broadway playwright Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa. Production has not begun as of the writing of this Note.
      End credits state: “Levi Stubbs’ appearance courtesy of Motown Records”; "I Love Lucy courtesy of CBS Inc., and Viacom Enterprises”; “ Howdy Doody ©1986 courtesy of National Broadcasting Company, Inc."; "Life title and format used with permission of Time Incorporated”; and, “Filmed entirely at Pinewood Studios Ltd., Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire, England.” The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “Special Thanks to Horticulture magazine, Better Homes And Gardens, TV Guide magazine, Paul Dooley and Robin Oz.” Acknowledgments state: "Based on the musical play Little Shop of Horrors, which was based on the film by Roger Corman - screenplay by Charles Griffith. Originally produced Off-Off Broadway by the WPA Theatre. Produced as an Off Broadway production by The WPA Theatre, David Geffen, Cameron Mackintosh and The Shubert Organization. Puppets for the play designed by Martin P. Robinson." Onscreen copyright information reads: "© 1986 Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp., Safespace Music, Menken Music, Trunksong Music Ltd., WB Music Corp., Geffen Music and Shoptalk Ltd. All songs from the play, "Little Shop of Horrors" ©1982, 1986 WB Music Corp., Geffen Music, Trunksong Music Ltd."
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Back Stage
10 Apr 1987.
---
Daily Variety
29 Apr 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Mar 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Dec 1986
p. 3, 22.
Hollywood Reporter
3 May 2012.
---
Los Angeles Times
5 Oct 1986.
---
Los Angeles Times
19 Dec 1986
p. 1, 16.
Los Angeles Times
5 Jan 1987
p. 1, 7.
New York
22 Sep 1986.
---
New York Times
19 Dec 1986
p. 5.
Screen International
28 Jun 1986.
---
Variety
10 Aug 1983.
---
Variety
16 Oct 1985.
---
Variety
10 Dec 1986
p. 14.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
With a Special Appearance by
as
Introducing:
as Crystal
as Chiffon
[and]
as Ronette
"Voice of Audrey II" performed by
of The Four Tops
Special Guest Stars:
as
+

NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
With a Special Appearance by
as
Introducing:
as Crystal
as Chiffon
[and]
as Ronette
"Voice of Audrey II" performed by
of The Four Tops
Special Guest Stars:
as
Additional players:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Geffen Company Release
The Geffen Company Presents
A Frank Oz Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
3d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Line prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Focus puller
Clapper loader
Addl grip
2d unit cam
2d unit cam
2d unit cam op
Cam trainee
Video supv
Video asst
Intercom tech/Video op
Still photog
Supv elec
Best boy
Gaffer (2d unit)
Cam op
Focus puller
Clapper loader
Addl lighting equip
Grip package
Camera by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dir (Models)
Asst art dir
Prod illustrator
Art dept trainee
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
1st asst ed
2d asst film ed
Ed trainee
Asst ed (L.A)
Asst ed (L.A)
Asst ed (L.A)
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Const coord
Prod buyer (U.K.)
Prod buyer (U.S.)
Draughtsperson
Draughtsperson
Draughtsperson
Sculptor/Modeller
Model maker
Supv propman
Chargehand props
Prop storeman
Propman
Propman
Carpenter
Painter
Plasterer
Plasterer's laborer
Stagehand
Rigger
Carpenter (Animatronics)
Stagehand (Animatronics)
Rigger (Animatronics)
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Asst cost des
Ward asst
Ward asst
Ward asst
Seamstress
MUSIC
Orig motion picture score by
Mus prod by
Lyrics by
Mus by
Mus supv
Mus coord
Orch and mus arrangements by
Orch and mus arrangements by
Vocal arranger
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Mus pre-rec (London)
Asst eng
Mus asst
Mus asst
Mus asst
Mus pre-rec (Los Angeles)
Asst eng
Asst eng
Addl overdubs
Mus asst
Mus asst
Orig score rec
Eng
Orch contractor
Mus copying
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Playback op
Sd maintenance
Sd ed
ADR ed
Asst sd ed
Asst ADR ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Dolby consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
"Audrey II" des and created by
Spec visual eff by
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Principal plant performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Addl performer
Coord, Animatronics staff
Chief mechanical des, Animatronics staff
Chief mechanical des, Animatronics staff
Head of fabrication, Animatronics staff
Sr modeller, Animatronics staff
Sr painter, Animatronics staff
Sr painter, Animatronics staff
Head of foam lab, Animatronics staff
Sr mechanical des, Animatronics staff
Sr mechanical des, Animatronics staff
Sr mechanical des, Animatronics staff
Sr mechanical des, Animatronics staff
Sr mechanical des, Animatronics staff
Sr mechanical des, Animatronics staff
Fabrication, Animatronics staff
Fabrication, Animatronics staff
Fabrication, Animatronics staff
Fabrication, Animatronics staff
Fabrication, Animatronics staff
Fabrication, Animatronics staff
Fabrication, Animatronics staff
Fabrication, Animatronics staff
Modeller, Animatronics staff
Modeller, Animatronics staff
Modeller, Animatronics staff
Modeller, Animatronics staff
Modeller, Animatronics staff
Modeller, Animatronics staff
Animatronics tech, Animatronics staff
Animatronics tech, Animatronics staff
Animatronics tech, Animatronics staff
Animatronics tech, Animatronics staff
Animatronics tech, Animatronics staff
Animatronics tech, Animatronics staff
Animatronics tech, Animatronics staff
Animatronics asst, Animatronics staff
Animatronics asst, Animatronics staff
Animatronics plasterer, Animatronics staff
Animatronics plasterer, Animatronics staff
Trainee, Animatronics staff
Trainee, Animatronics staff
Visual eff ed
Visual eff ed
Spec physical eff
Spec physical eff
Spec physical eff
Model unit supv
Asst dir
Scr supv
Cam op
Focus puller
Clapper loader
Model tech
Model tech
Model tech
Model tech
Model maker
Model maker
Sculptor
Sr eff tech
Spec eff asst
Gen asst
Runner
Video op
Spec visual eff
New York
Project coord, Spec visual eff, Associates & Ferre
Project coord, Spec visual eff, Associates & Ferre
Project coord, Spec visual eff, Associates & Ferre
Project coord, Spec visual eff, Associates & Ferre
Motion control, Spec visual eff, Associates & Ferr
Motion control, Spec visual eff, Associates & Ferr
Motion control, Spec visual eff, Associates & Ferr
Motion control, Spec visual eff, Associates & Ferr
Motion control, Spec visual eff, Associates & Ferr
Electronics, Spec visual eff, Associates & Ferren
Electronics, Spec visual eff, Associates & Ferren
Electronics, Spec visual eff, Associates & Ferren
Graphics & anim, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Graphics & anim, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Graphics & anim, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Graphics & anim, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Graphics & anim, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Graphics & anim, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Graphics & anim, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Graphics & anim, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Graphics & anim, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Graphics & anim, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Graphics & anim, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Graphics & anim, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Graphics & anim, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Graphics & anim, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Graphics & anim, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Graphics & anim, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Opt eff, Spec visual eff, Associates & Ferren
Opt eff, Spec visual eff, Associates & Ferren
Opt eff, Spec visual eff, Associates & Ferren
Opt eff, Spec visual eff, Associates & Ferren
Opt eff, Spec visual eff, Associates & Ferren
Systems support, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Systems support, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Systems support, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Systems support, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Systems support, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Systems support, Spec visual eff, Associates & Fer
Title des by
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Chief makeup artist
Makeup artist
Chief hairdresser
Hairdresser
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod supv for The Geffen Company
Mus casting by
Prod coord
Asst to Mr. Oz
Casting dir (U.K.)
Physical therapist
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Computer op
Cashier
Prod office asst
Prod's secy
Pre-prod secy (N.Y.)
Prod runner
Prod runner
Prod runner
Prod runner
Prod runner
Unit pub
Asst pub
Post prod coord (L.A.)
ANIMATION
Robin anim
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the musical Little Shop of Horrors, book and lyrics by Howard Ashman, music by Alan Menken, lyrics by Howard Ashman (New York, 2 Oct 2003) and the film of the same name written by Charles B. Griffith (Santa Clara Productions, Inc., 1960).
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 December 1986
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 19 December 1986
Production Date:
21 October 1985--late June 1986
re-shoots fall 1986
Copyright Claimant:
The Geffen Film Company
Copyright Date:
28 July 1987
Copyright Number:
PA353065
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® Camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
94
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28048
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At Mushnik’s Floral Shop on Skid Row, owner Mr. Mushnik, complains that Audrey, an employee, is late, but notices her black eye. Another employee, Seymour Krelborn, trips as he carries a box of ceramic pots into the shop, and they all break. Mushnik complains about misfit employees and business being slow, while Audrey helps Seymour clean up the mess. At closing, Mushnik is upset that there have been no customers all day, and threatens to permanently close the shop. Seymour has an idea and fetches a peculiar plant that he has been caring for in the basement. He calls the plant “Audrey II” and places it in the store window, but Mushnik is unconvinced it is the answer to their financial problems. However, a stranger immediately walks into the shop and makes inquiries. Seymour explains that he bought it from a Chinese man at the wholesale flower market following a total eclipse of the sun. The man likes Seymour’s story, and buys $100 worth of roses. Soon, customers flock to the shop to ask about the strange little plant in the window. They buy so many fresh flowers that Mushnik invites Seymour and Audrey to dinner to celebrate. Audrey declines because she has a date. When Mushnik calls her boyfriend a “no-goodnik,” Audrey says he is the only prospect she has. Meanwhile, Audrey II begins to wilt. Instead of going to dinner, Mushnik orders Seymour to nurse his strange little plant back to life. As Seymour mulls over the best way to save the plant, he pricks his finger on a rose thorn and draws blood. He notices that the lips of Audrey II’s large bud press together ... +


At Mushnik’s Floral Shop on Skid Row, owner Mr. Mushnik, complains that Audrey, an employee, is late, but notices her black eye. Another employee, Seymour Krelborn, trips as he carries a box of ceramic pots into the shop, and they all break. Mushnik complains about misfit employees and business being slow, while Audrey helps Seymour clean up the mess. At closing, Mushnik is upset that there have been no customers all day, and threatens to permanently close the shop. Seymour has an idea and fetches a peculiar plant that he has been caring for in the basement. He calls the plant “Audrey II” and places it in the store window, but Mushnik is unconvinced it is the answer to their financial problems. However, a stranger immediately walks into the shop and makes inquiries. Seymour explains that he bought it from a Chinese man at the wholesale flower market following a total eclipse of the sun. The man likes Seymour’s story, and buys $100 worth of roses. Soon, customers flock to the shop to ask about the strange little plant in the window. They buy so many fresh flowers that Mushnik invites Seymour and Audrey to dinner to celebrate. Audrey declines because she has a date. When Mushnik calls her boyfriend a “no-goodnik,” Audrey says he is the only prospect she has. Meanwhile, Audrey II begins to wilt. Instead of going to dinner, Mushnik orders Seymour to nurse his strange little plant back to life. As Seymour mulls over the best way to save the plant, he pricks his finger on a rose thorn and draws blood. He notices that the lips of Audrey II’s large bud press together to make smacking noises. When Seymour approaches the plant with his bloody finger, it appears very interested. It opens like a Venus flytrap eager to suck his blood. When Seymour offers the plant a few drops of his blood, it makes a miraculous recovery. Later, as Seymour is interviewed on radio station SKID, he announces to listeners that Audrey II is exclusively on display at Mushnik’s Floral Shop. Back at the shop, Seymour continues to feed the voracious Audrey II. Customers crowd the store, and Audrey comments that Seymour has not celebrated his success, and should buy some new clothes. When Seymour admits that he is a bad shopper, Audrey says she would be happy to help him shop, but she has a date. Mushnik reminds Audrey that her boyfriend is a lowlife. As it turns out, Audrey’s boyfriend, Orin Scrivello, is a sadistic dentist who delights in inflicting pain on his patients. When Scrivello arrives for their date, he recognizes Seymour as “the plant guy” from television. Seymour notices how Scrivello intimidates Audrey. Later, although Seymour has no more blood to give, Audrey II demands, in a deep male voice, that it needs human blood to thrive. Although Seymour has great misgivings, he has no choice but to commit murder in order to keep Audrey II happy. From afar, Seymour observes Orin Scrivello abusing Audrey, and decides the dentist will be his first victim to satisfy his strange plant’s voracious appetite. Later, as Scrivello examines a new patient, masochist Arthur Denton, Seymour sits in the waiting room with a gun hidden in his pants pocket. When Arthur enjoys the pain too much, Scrivello kicks him out of the office and drags Seymour into his examining room. There, he produces a rusty, antique instrument to drill Seymour’s teeth. Before he begins, Scrivello heightens the experience by inhaling nitrous oxide after strapping cannisters to his back. Seymour jumps out of the chair and points his gun at the dentist. Scrivello sees the gun and laughs, but breaks the knob of the nitrous oxide canister when shutting it off. Seymour watches in horror as Scrivello dies in front of his eyes from a gas overdose. Late at night, Seymour sneaks a body bag containing Scrivello to his basement apartment below the floral shop. Audrey II demands to be fed and orders Seymour to chop the body into pieces. Mr. Mushnik stops by the store and sees Seymour in the alley, carving up Scrivello’s body with an axe and runs away. In the morning, police question Audrey. When Seymour insists on knowing what they wanted, Audrey responds that Scrivello has disappeared and may have met with “foul play.” She admits that she wished for his death many times, but now she feels guilty. Seymour insists that she should forget about Scrivello, and that any nice guy would be happy to date her. However, she claims that due to her sordid past, she does not deserve a nice boyfriend. Seymour assures her that she deserves the best and they kiss. After walking Audrey to her apartment, Seymour returns home, where Mushnik confronts him about disposing of Scrivello so that he could become Audrey’s boyfriend. When Seymour confesses he chopped up Scrivello but did not kill him, Mushnik produces a gun and demands Seymour tell his story to the police. Upstairs, Mushnik has a sudden change of heart and offers Seymour a deal. He will say nothing to the police if Seymour leaves town for a long time and shows him how to take care of Audrey II. As Seymour reels off plant tips, Mushnik backs toward the plant. Suddenly, he spins around and Audrey II spreads open its Venus flytrap-like mouth. As Mushnik peers in for a closer look, the plant swallows him whole, and Seymour cowers by the door. Later, Seymour is featured on the covers of Life and Horticulture magazine, and is set to host a television gardening show. However, when television reporters attempt to interview him at the florist shop, Audrey II faints from hunger. A reporter offers to feed the plant, but Seymour refuses his help and runs out of the shop. Audrey finds him in the alley, and tells him the reporters will return the following day with a big check. Seymour brightens at the thought of the money, and asks Audrey to marry him. When she says yes, he decides they will go to City Hall to wed, take the money, leave town and start a new life. Later, as Seymour leaves the shop with packed suitcases, Audrey II demands to be fed. Seymour refuses to give the plant any more human body parts. It makes him feel guilty, but he offers to bring back ground beef instead. Soon, Audrey II steals change from the cash register and uses the payphone to call Audrey. From her apartment across the street, Audrey realizes she is speaking to Audrey II. Audrey runs to the shop, where Audrey II wraps her in its vines. Seymour arrives in time to rescue Audrey. He carries her to the alley and apologizes for allowing things to get out of hand so that he could become famous, and Audrey would want to be with him. However, Audrey confesses she wanted to be with Seymour from the first time that she met him. Seymour tells Audrey he will destroy the plant before it commits any more murder. Inside the shop, Seymour accuses Audrey II of plotting world domination. Audrey II bursts free from its ceramic container, sprouting smaller pods, and confesses to being a nasty plant from outer space. Audrey II steals Seymour’s gun before he can shoot, and Seymour has no better luck with an axe. Next, Audrey II destroys the floral shop. Suddenly, Seymour’s arm appears out of the rubble with a handful of exposed electrical wire. He electrocutes the plant along with its baby pods until it disintegrates into thin air. Seymour survives the ordeal, and Audrey is overjoyed. She and Seymour marry and live happily in an idyllic house in the suburbs. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.