The Mosquito Coast (1986)

PG | 117 mins | Drama, Adventure | 26 November 1986

Director:

Peter Weir

Writer:

Paul Schrader

Producer:

Jerome Hellman

Cinematographer:

John Seale

Editor:

Thom Noble

Production Designer:

John Stoddart

Production Company:

Saul Zaentz Company
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HISTORY

A 12 Dec 1986 DV article reported producer Jerome Hellman asked director Peter Weir during a telephone conversation if he would read Paul Schrader’s script The Mosquito Coast. Weir was familiar with the Paul Theroux novel as actress Sigourney Weaver had given him a copy when he was in post-production on The Year Of Living Dangerously. (1982).
       According to 7 Feb 1986 and 25 Apr 1986 NYT articles, part of the difficulty Hellman experienced securing financing was tied to the reluctance of film executives to embrace the complex subject matter of a lead character going insane. Production notes in AMPAS library files add that Hellman and Weir encountered two tough years of film studio management changes. No sooner would the men receive approvals for production than the executive involved would leave, resign or be fired, and they would have to start the process all over again.
       A Dec 1986 Moviegoer article stated that Hellman originally wanted actor Jack Nicholson for the lead role with a deal set up at Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp.
       A 27 Jan 1986 HR news item announced that principal photography would get underway on 3 Feb 1986 in Belize. The 25 Apr 1985 NYT and a brief in the 14 Jan 1986 LADN stated that the $16 million-film had a ten-week shooting schedule. A 19 Jun 1986 HR news item announced that principal photography was completed in Georgia.
       Production notes state that Hellman and Weir traveled to Jamaica, and investigated Hawaii, Costa Rica, and Guatemala, Mexico, before deciding that Belize, located on the ... More Less

A 12 Dec 1986 DV article reported producer Jerome Hellman asked director Peter Weir during a telephone conversation if he would read Paul Schrader’s script The Mosquito Coast. Weir was familiar with the Paul Theroux novel as actress Sigourney Weaver had given him a copy when he was in post-production on The Year Of Living Dangerously. (1982).
       According to 7 Feb 1986 and 25 Apr 1986 NYT articles, part of the difficulty Hellman experienced securing financing was tied to the reluctance of film executives to embrace the complex subject matter of a lead character going insane. Production notes in AMPAS library files add that Hellman and Weir encountered two tough years of film studio management changes. No sooner would the men receive approvals for production than the executive involved would leave, resign or be fired, and they would have to start the process all over again.
       A Dec 1986 Moviegoer article stated that Hellman originally wanted actor Jack Nicholson for the lead role with a deal set up at Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp.
       A 27 Jan 1986 HR news item announced that principal photography would get underway on 3 Feb 1986 in Belize. The 25 Apr 1985 NYT and a brief in the 14 Jan 1986 LADN stated that the $16 million-film had a ten-week shooting schedule. A 19 Jun 1986 HR news item announced that principal photography was completed in Georgia.
       Production notes state that Hellman and Weir traveled to Jamaica, and investigated Hawaii, Costa Rica, and Guatemala, Mexico, before deciding that Belize, located on the Central American coast south of the Yucatan Peninsula, was the perfect location.
       A Feb 1987 AmCin article reported that director of photography John Searle shot the picture in largely documentary style. While filming in the jungle, Searle maintained a feeling of intimacy by using close-ups of faces or partial faces, feet and hands.
       According to a Feb 1987 Theatre Crafts article, supervising sound editor Alan Splet used a recording of “pulsing cicadas” in a scene in which the Harrison Ford’s character contemplates the move to Belize to foreshadow later events.
       Production notes state that Weir wanted the “construction of Jeronimo, an abandoned town” on the island to “be filmed in continuity.” To achieve the sense of progression, three Jeronimo sets were built, representing different stages of the town’s development.
       According to production notes, the film marked the theatrical film debuts of twin sisters and child models, Hilary and Rebecca Gordon.
       End credits state: ‘Lines from ‘Fragment of an Agon’ by T. S. Eliot courtesy of Mrs. Valerie Eliot and Faber and Faber Ltd., London”; “All film editing, sound editing and Dolby Stereo® mix completed at the SZC Film Center, Berkeley, California”; and “Filmed entirely on location in Belize, Central America; Rome, Georgia, and Baltimore, Maryland.”
       The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “Special Thanks to: The people and government of Belize; the British Forces Belize; Great Belize Productions; Georgia Film Commission; Governor Joe Frank Harris and Secretary of State Max Cleland, Georgia; Maryland Commission and Mayor’s Office, Baltimore, Maryland.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Feb 1987
p. 60-65
Daily Variety
12 Dec 1986
p.30, 36
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jan 1986
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jun 1986
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Nov 1986
p. 3, 12.
Los Angeles Daily News
14 Jan 1985
---
Los Angeles Times
26 Nov 1986
p. 1, 12.
Moviegoer
Dec 1986
p. 6-7
New York Times
7 Feb 1986
---
New York Times
25 Apr 1985
---
New York Times
26 Nov 1986
p. 14.
Theatre Crafts
Feb 1987
p. 71-72
Variety
19 Nov 1986
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
The Saul Zaentz Company Presents
A Jerome Hellman Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
3rd asst dir
4th asst dir
Asst dir trainee
Prod mgr
Prod mgr, USA unit
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Transport mgr, Belizean crew
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Unit still photog
Spec photog
Cam op, 1st cam crew
Focus puller, 1st cam crew
Clapper/Loader, 1st cam crew
Cam, 2d unit photog
Focus puller, 2d unit photog
Clapper/Loader, 2d unit photog
Cam op, Addl cam crew
Cam op, Addl cam crew
Cam asst, Addl cam crew
Gaffer, Elec
Best boy/Elec
Elec, Elec
Elec, Elec
Elec, Elec
Elec, Elec
Elec, Elec
Key grip, Elec
Dolly grip, Elec
Asst grip, Elec
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
2d asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed, USA post prod crew
Apprentice ed, USA post prod crew
Apprentice ed, USA post prod crew
Ed, Australian post prod crew
Asst ed, Australian post prod crew
Asst ed, Australian post prod crew
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst prop master
Standby props
Asst props
Set dec
Leadman
Leadman
Const coord
Const foreman 1
Const foreman 2
Metalwork foreman
Painter foreman
Rigger
Greensman
Const foreman, Belizean crew
Asst set dec, USA unit
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Ward mistress
Ward consultant
Ward asst
Asst cost des
Ward asst, Belizean crew
MUSIC
Electronic ensemble under the supv of Maurice Jarr
Electronic ensemble under the supv of Maurice Jarr
Electronic ensemble under the supv of Maurice Jarr
Electronic ensemble under the supv of Maurice Jarr
Electronic ensemble under the supv of Maurice Jarr
Electronic ensemble under the supv of Maurice Jarr
Mus rec by, For Record Plant Scoring Inc.
Mus ed
Supv mus ed
SOUND
Prod sd rec, Sd crew
Boom op, Sd crew
Sd maintenance, Sd crew
Supv sd ed, USA post prod crew
Supv re-rec mixer, USA post prod crew
Supv dial ed, USA post prod crew
Dial ed, USA post prod crew
Dial ed, USA post prod crew
ADR ed, USA post prod crew
ADR ed, USA post prod crew
Sd eff rec, USA post prod crew
Sd eff ed, USA post prod crew
Sd eff ed, USA post prod crew
Sd eff ed, USA post prod crew
Sd eff ed, USA post prod crew
Asst sd ed, USA post prod crew
Foley ed, USA post prod crew
Foley ed, USA post prod crew
Foley ed, USA post prod crew
Foley artist, USA post prod crew
Foley eng, USA post prod crew
Foley eng, USA post prod crew
Dial asst, USA post prod crew
Dial asst, USA post prod crew
Dial asst, USA post prod crew
Dial asst, USA post prod crew
Dial asst, USA post prod crew
Sd eff asst, USA post prod crew
Sd eff asst, USA post prod crew
Sd eff asst, USA post prod crew
Sd eff asst, USA post prod crew
Sd eff asst, USA post prod crew
Foley asst, USA post prod crew
Foley asst, USA post prod crew
Re-rec mixer, USA post prod crew
Re-rec mixer, USA post prod crew
Dubbing ed, Australian post prod crew
Asst dubbing ed, Australian post prod crew
Dial mixer, Australian post prod crew
Eff mixer, Australian post prod crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Eff coord, Spec Effects Unlimited Inc.
Eff supv, Spec Effects Unlimited Inc.
Eff crew, Special Effects Unlimited Inc.
Eff crew, Special Effects Unlimited Inc.
Eff crew, Special Effects Unlimited Inc.
Eff crew, Special Effects Unlimited Inc.
Eff crew, Special Effects Unlimited Inc.
Eff crew, Special Effects Unlimited Inc.
Eff crew, Special Effects Unlimited Inc.
Consultant, Special Effects Unlimited Inc.
Spec eff foreman, Belizean crew
Opticals by
Title des by
MAKEUP
Chief makeup/Hair
Natives teeth
PRODUCTION MISC
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Cont & asst to Mr. Weir
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst to the prod
Financial controller
Prod accountant
Asst financial controller
Casting asst, NYC
Casting apprentice, LA
Casting-Central America
Casting-Mexico
Pub relations
Unit pub
Prod asst
Prod asst
Courier
Courier
Teacher
Prod office secy, Belizean crew
Prod's secy, Belizean crew
Accounting asst, Belizean crew
Nurse, Belizean crew
Transport mgr, Belizean crew
Security chief, Belizean crew
Animal consultant, Belizean crew
Animals courtesy of, Belizean crew
Prod coord, USA unit
Asst to prod, USA unit
Post prod coord, USA post prod crew
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Saul Zaentz Film Center staff
Post prod coord, Australian post prod crew
Post prod accountancy, Australian post prod crew
Post prod accountancy, Moneypenny Services Ltd., A
Post prod facilities, Australian post prod crew
International air transportation provided by
Travel services provided by
Prod boats provided by
STAND INS
Stunt double
Harrison Ford stand-in
Helen Mirren stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Mosquito Coast by Paul Theroux (London, 1981).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Clap Your Hands," words and music by Gary Johnson, published by Lillenas Publishing Company (SESAC), performed by The Grace Chapel Primary School Choir
"Sing Alleluia," words and music by Gary Johnson, published by Lillenas Publishing Company (SESAC), performed by The Grace Chapel Primary School Choir
"Gimme Soca," by Anthony Carter, published by Grant Music, Ltd., used by permission of Chappell Music, Ltd., performed by Byron Lee and the Dragonaires, permission of Dynamic Sounds Recording Co., Ltd.
+
SONGS
"Clap Your Hands," words and music by Gary Johnson, published by Lillenas Publishing Company (SESAC), performed by The Grace Chapel Primary School Choir
"Sing Alleluia," words and music by Gary Johnson, published by Lillenas Publishing Company (SESAC), performed by The Grace Chapel Primary School Choir
"Gimme Soca," by Anthony Carter, published by Grant Music, Ltd., used by permission of Chappell Music, Ltd., performed by Byron Lee and the Dragonaires, permission of Dynamic Sounds Recording Co., Ltd.
"Chuluya Mama," performed by the Larunihati Group
"Mali Mali," performed by the Isabel Flores Group
"Savior, Like A Shepherd Lend Us," performed by the Ron Hicklin Singers, conducted by O. D. Hall.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 November 1986
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 26 November 1986
Production Date:
3 February--19 June 1986
Copyright Claimant:
The Saul Zaentz Company
Copyright Date:
13 March 1987
Copyright Number:
PA318225
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo® in selected theaters
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex Camera by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
117
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28390
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

An inventor named Allie Fox drives with his son, Charlie, through a billboard-laden strip of town, complaining that Americans are bombarded with advertising, and the country has become “a toilet.” They stop at a hardware store for supplies, but Allie rejects the product he requested because it was manufactured in Japan. Instead, he and Charlie find the same item at the dump. In the days ahead, Allie become restless and believes the United States will soon be at war. Their farmer landlord, Mr. Polski, is angry when Allie arrives late with an invention called “Fat Boy.” Allie demonstrates how the machine is able to turn a glass of water to ice. Although Allie claims he can build a larger model that will keep the farmer’s asparagus crop from spoiling, Mr. Polski is unimpressed. After the rejection, Allie becomes obsessive about relocating to the jungle. Allie has Charlie deliver a letter to Polski, announcing his desire to leave the country and go to the Mosquito Coast. Polski tells Charlie that his father is a dangerous man who is going to get his family killed. Allie is joined by his sons Charlie and Jerry, twin daughters, April and Clover, and wife, Mother, for the long trip. During the journey, Allie expresses his disdain for religion to Reverend Spellgood and his wife. Emily Spellgood, the minister’s daughter, strikes up a conversation with Charlie as he surveys the ocean with his binoculars. She asks about his father’s profession, and does not know whether to believe Charlie’s claim that his father is a “genius.” However she offers to become his girl friend. At night, Mother Fox watches the twins at a local hotel, ... +


An inventor named Allie Fox drives with his son, Charlie, through a billboard-laden strip of town, complaining that Americans are bombarded with advertising, and the country has become “a toilet.” They stop at a hardware store for supplies, but Allie rejects the product he requested because it was manufactured in Japan. Instead, he and Charlie find the same item at the dump. In the days ahead, Allie become restless and believes the United States will soon be at war. Their farmer landlord, Mr. Polski, is angry when Allie arrives late with an invention called “Fat Boy.” Allie demonstrates how the machine is able to turn a glass of water to ice. Although Allie claims he can build a larger model that will keep the farmer’s asparagus crop from spoiling, Mr. Polski is unimpressed. After the rejection, Allie becomes obsessive about relocating to the jungle. Allie has Charlie deliver a letter to Polski, announcing his desire to leave the country and go to the Mosquito Coast. Polski tells Charlie that his father is a dangerous man who is going to get his family killed. Allie is joined by his sons Charlie and Jerry, twin daughters, April and Clover, and wife, Mother, for the long trip. During the journey, Allie expresses his disdain for religion to Reverend Spellgood and his wife. Emily Spellgood, the minister’s daughter, strikes up a conversation with Charlie as he surveys the ocean with his binoculars. She asks about his father’s profession, and does not know whether to believe Charlie’s claim that his father is a “genius.” However she offers to become his girl friend. At night, Mother Fox watches the twins at a local hotel, while in a bar, Allie strikes a deal with a local real estate agent. When Allie returns, he announces to his wife that he has purchased a town called “Jeronimo.” The next day, boat captain Mr. Haddy transports the Fox family to an isolated tropical jungle island. When the boat docks, Allie runs ahead and discovers the town to be barely habitable. He announces to his family that they will build a spacious compound. April and Clover miss their home, but Allie explains that they left because he did not want the family to witness the decline of the United States. The next day, Allie assembles local residents to plant crops, build shelters, and start a fish farm. Meanwhile, Allie builds contraptions to catch rainwater and wash laundry. Mr. Haddy brings bolts of cloth from which Mother makes shirts, rompers and shorts. Allie is convinced that his children are learning important survival skills. Word spreads of Allie’s accomplishments, and Rev. Spellgood visits to see for himself. Allie does not like the idea of the clergyman proselytizing on his estate, and suggests that workers who want to attend church services go back to the mainland. When the compound is finally built, the Fox family celebrates with the workers. Later, Allie builds a larger version of Fat Boy, which will provide air conditioning for the compound. The invention also produces blocks of ice that Allie provides to the natives for free. He soon grows restless and wants to share his ice with a nearby indigenous tribe that is isolated from civilization. When Allie reaches the tribe, he unwraps the gift to find that the ice has melted away. One English-speaking native tells Allie and his group to go away. While Allie confers with a fellow white man, Charlie explains to the tribe why they brought the ice and what makes it special. When Allie and his group leave, he explains that the tribe is holding three white men prisoner. They have a plan to escape, and Allie offers them refuge in Jeronimo. The next day, worker Francis Lungley is picking tomatoes in the hot house, and comes upon three strangers with rifles. He alerts Allie, who soon discovers that the three prisoners are actually mercenaries. Allie offers them a boat and a chance to leave. However, they like the paradise Allie has created. He tells them that the compound is undergoing an ant invasion, but they insist on staying. The mercenaries make themselves comfortable in a section of the house until Allie dismantles it with a chainsaw, claiming it is the only way to get rid of the ants. However, the mercenaries are undeterred, and Allie gives them lodging in the bunkhouse. Late at night, per his father’s instructions, Charlie climbs to the top of the giant Fat Boy and bolts the mercenaries in their quarters, inside the icemaker. As Allie starts the machine, the men attempt to shoot their way out, causing an explosion that spreads fire throughout the compound. In the morning, Allie stares numbly at the destruction, although he tells Mother the fire has freed him. The family wants to return to America but Allie insists there is nothing left for them back home. America has been destroyed by nuclear war. Allie builds a houseboat by the ocean, a latrine and a vegetable garden. One day, Mr. Haddy brings turtle meat and other food, and warns that the rainy season is coming. If Allie does not move his camp, it will wash into the sea. Sometime later, Mr. Haddy gives Charlie parts of an outboard motor to hide. He says the family will need it to escape when the rains come. Allie awakens and discovers a pounding storm outside. The family gathers in the houseboat as it is swept out to sea. As Charlie hands his father the motor parts, Allie insists on traveling upstream rather than toward Mr. Haddy’s town. By morning, the storm passes, and the family floats on the river. After the motor quits, Allie announces the rudder is missing. He ties a rope to his ankle and dives overboard. After an uncomfortable length of time, Mother pulls the rope aboard but Allie is gone. Mother becomes hysterical, and her sons suggest they find Mr. Haddy. Suddenly, Allie climbs aboard with the missing part, and calls them traitors. As punishment, Allie tows his sons in a skiff behind the boat. Mother wants her sons back on board, but Allie refuses. Soon, the family hears a church choir, and Rev. Spellgood’s booming voice at his compound. Abruptly, Allie docks his craft and goes to the church to confront the minister. Instead, he finds parishioners listening to the sermon on a widescreen television, and the Fox family returns to their boat. That night, Charlie and Jerry return to the preacher’s house, and Emily Spellgood gives them keys to a jeep. Charlie and Jerry want their mother and sisters to join them, but Mother refuses to leave her husband behind. Suddenly, they see the church bell tower on fire. Mother orders Charlie to round up the twins. When Mother and the boys inform Allie they are leaving, he calls out to them, but the Rev. Spellgood shoots Allie in the chest. The family carries him to the boat. As Charlie and Jerry paddle, Allie wants to know if they are traveling up river, then dies. The Fox family returns to their life in America. Allie runs ahead and sees the town is dilapidated and barely habitable. He announces to his family that they will build a spacious compound from scratch. When April and Clover miss their home, Allie explains that they left because he did not want the family to stay and watch the decline of America. The next day, Allie assembles locals to plant crops. For several weeks, every waking hour is spent building shelter. Allie assigns one worker to start a fish farm. Meanwhile, Allie builds contraptions to catch rainwater, and wash laundry. Mr. Haddy brings bolts of cloth that Mother sews into shirts, rompers and shorts. Allie is convinced that his children are learning important survival skills. Soon, word spreads of Allie’s accomplishments, and the Rev. Spellgood visits to see for himself. Allie does not like the idea of the clergyman proselytizing on his land, and suggests that workers who want to attend church services go back to the mainland. After Rev. Spellgood quotes from Exodus 5, Allie demands that he leave. When the compound is finally built, the Fox family celebrates with the workers. Later, Allie builds a bigger version of Fat Boy. When it is finished, he demonstrates how the machine manufactures snow, and can provide air conditioning for the compound. The invention also produces blocks of ice that Allie provides to the locals for free. However, he grows restless and wants to share his ice with a nearby indigenous tribe isolated from civilization. Along the journey, Jerry Fox complains that there is nowhere to sleep. Hi father demands he stop whining. In the morning, Allie meets up with the tribe, but when he unwraps the gift, the ice has melted away. One native speaks in English and tells Allie and his group to go away. In the distance, Allie sees a white man, and speaks with him as Charlie explains to the tribe why they brought the ice and what makes it special. When Allie and his group leave, he explains that the tribe is holding three white men prisoner. He offered to help them escape, but they claim to have a plan, and he suggested they follow his trail to Jeronimo. The next day, worker Francis Lungley, is picking tomatoes in the hot house, and comes upon three strangers with rifles. He alerts Allie, who soon discovers that the three prisoners he invited to Jeronimo are actually mercenaries. Allie offers them a boat and a chance to leave. However, they like the paradise Allie has created, and are not eager to go. Allie tells them that the compound is undergoing an ant invasion, but they decide to stick around anyway. The mercenaries make themselves comfortable in a section of the house until Allie takes it apart with a chainsaw claiming it is the only way to get rid of the ants. However, the mercenaries are undeterred, and Allie puts them up in the bunkhouse. Late at night, per his father’s instructions, Charlie climbs to the top of the giant Fat Boy and bolts the mercenaries in their quarters, inside the icemaker. As Allie starts the machine, the men try shooting their way out. It sets off a giant explosion that destroys the machine, and spreads fire throughout the compound. In the morning, Allie stares numbly at the destruction, although he tells Mother the fire has freed him. The family wants to return to America but Allie insists there is nothing left for them back home. America has been destroyed by nuclear war. Allie gets to work and builds a houseboat by the ocean, a latrine and a vegetable garden. One day, Mr. Haddy brings turtle meat and other food, and warns that the rainy season is coming. If Allie does not move camp, it will wash into the sea. Sometime later, Mr. Haddy gives Charlie parts of an outboard motor to hide. He says the family will need it to escape when the rains come. Allie awakens and discovers a pounding storm outside. The family gathers in the houseboat as it is swept out to sea. As Charlie hands his father the motor parts, Allie insists on traveling upstream instead of toward Mr. Haddy’s town. By morning, the storm passes, and the family floats on the river. Soon, the motor quits. Allie announces the rudder is missing. He ties a rope to his ankle and dives overboard. After an uncomfortable length of time, Mother pulls the rope aboard but Allie is gone. Mother becomes hysterical, and her sons suggest they find Mr. Haddy. Suddenly, Allie climbs aboard with the missing part, and calls them traitors. As punishment, Allie tows his sons in a skiff behind the boat. Mother wants her sons back on board, but Allie refuses. Soon, the family hears a church choir, and Rev. Spellgood’s booming voice at his compound. Abruptly, Allie docks his craft and makes his way to the church to confront the minister. Instead, he finds parishioners listening to the sermon on a widescreen television, and the Fox family returns to their boat. At night, Charlie and Jerry return to the preacher’s house, and persuade Emily Spellgood to help them. She gives them keys to a Jeep. Charlie and Jerry want their mother and sisters to join them, but Mother refuses to leave her husband behind. Suddenly, they see the church bell tower on fire. Mother orders Charlie to round up the twins. When Mother and the boys inform Allie they are leaving, he calls out to them, but the Rev. Spellgood shoots Allie in the chest. The family carries him to the boat. As Charlie and Jerry paddle, Allie is paralyzed but wants to know if they are traveling up river, then dies. The Fox family returns to their life in America. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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