The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986)

95 mins | Horror, Comedy | 22 August 1986

Director:

Tobe Hooper

Cinematographer:

Richard Kooris

Production Designer:

Cary White

Production Company:

Cannon Group
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HISTORY

The film is a sequel to The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974, see entry) and a written prologue recaps that film and summarizes subsequent fictitious events, including a police manhunt that yielded no proof of the Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and continuing tales of chainsaw mass murders.
       End credits include the following statement: “Special thanks to: The Texas Film Commission, Joel Smith and Liz Kline; The Texas State Department of Highways and Public Transportation; The Texas Department of Public Safety; The City of Austin, Texas; The City of Bastrop, Texas; The County of Belton, Texas; Watson-Casey Companies; Artesia Waters, Inc.; B.H. & Associates, Inc.; Big Red, Inc.; Shiner Beer.”
       According to articles in the 8 Jun 1986 LAT and the 20 Aug 1986 HR, the sequel came together quickly. When director Tobe Hooper approached screenwriter L. M. Kit Carson to write the sequel, Carson’s first concern was finding appropriate “victims” for the film. While in Dallas, TX, Carson noticed that the shopping malls were “completely overrun by these strange people… called yuppies,” and he conceived the story of the murderous family pursuing yuppies. Hooper and Carson took their concept to Cannon Films and according to Carson, producer Menaham Golan agreed to the story “after about five lines,” and wanted the film ready for release on 22 Aug 1986. Carson began writing the screenplay in Jan 1986, and a production brief in the 13 May 1986 HR stated principal photography began 5 May 1986 in Austin, TX. The 23 Mar 1986 LAT noted the film was budgeted at $2.5 million. However, the 8 Jun ... More Less

The film is a sequel to The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974, see entry) and a written prologue recaps that film and summarizes subsequent fictitious events, including a police manhunt that yielded no proof of the Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and continuing tales of chainsaw mass murders.
       End credits include the following statement: “Special thanks to: The Texas Film Commission, Joel Smith and Liz Kline; The Texas State Department of Highways and Public Transportation; The Texas Department of Public Safety; The City of Austin, Texas; The City of Bastrop, Texas; The County of Belton, Texas; Watson-Casey Companies; Artesia Waters, Inc.; B.H. & Associates, Inc.; Big Red, Inc.; Shiner Beer.”
       According to articles in the 8 Jun 1986 LAT and the 20 Aug 1986 HR, the sequel came together quickly. When director Tobe Hooper approached screenwriter L. M. Kit Carson to write the sequel, Carson’s first concern was finding appropriate “victims” for the film. While in Dallas, TX, Carson noticed that the shopping malls were “completely overrun by these strange people… called yuppies,” and he conceived the story of the murderous family pursuing yuppies. Hooper and Carson took their concept to Cannon Films and according to Carson, producer Menaham Golan agreed to the story “after about five lines,” and wanted the film ready for release on 22 Aug 1986. Carson began writing the screenplay in Jan 1986, and a production brief in the 13 May 1986 HR stated principal photography began 5 May 1986 in Austin, TX. The 23 Mar 1986 LAT noted the film was budgeted at $2.5 million. However, the 8 Jun 1986 LAT reported a budget of $4.5 million.
       According to the 25 Jul 1986 DV, the 20 Aug 1986 HR and the Nov 1986 Box review, the film was released unrated. The film screened twice in Jul 1986 for the Motion Picture Association of America’s (MPAA) Classification and Rating Administration, and failed to obtain the desired R-rating. The filmmakers maintained that further cuts would disappoint fans expecting the “intensity” of the original film. The film would “undoubtedly” have received an X-rating for its violence and cannibalism, and the X-rating would have created advertising and booking issues. Cannon was a nonsignatory to the MPAA and could release the film unrated, although Cannon issued the film with a warning that no one under seventeen would be admitted. An item in the 3 Sep 1986 Var reported that Jack Valenti, president of MPAA, issued a statement on 28 Aug 1986 declaring the film was unrated. The MPAA learned that some theaters showing the film were indicating it was R-rated, and Valenti asserted the film “is not rated and must not be identified as having any rating.” The MPAA’s G, PG, PG-13 and R rating symbols are federally registered, and unauthorized use of the certification marks could “constitute unfair competition and trademark infringement.”
       The 4 Aug 1986 HR stated the film was released on more than 1,000 screens on 22 Aug 1986. An article in the Nov 2001 Sight and Sound reported the film’s box office performance was “weak” and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 was a “disappointment.”
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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Nov 1986.
---
Daily Variety
25 Jul 1986
p. 1, 27.
Hollywood Reporter
13 May 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jul 1986
p. 3, 54.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Aug 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Aug 1986.
---
Los Angeles Times
23 Mar 1986.
---
Los Angeles Times
8 Jun 1986
p. 20, 31.
Los Angeles Times
23 Aug 1986
p. 3, 8.
New York Times
23 Aug 1986
p. 9.
Sight and Sound
Nov 2001.
---
Variety
27 Aug 1986
p. 14.
Variety
3 Sep 1986.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
The Cannon Group, Inc. Presents
A Golan-Globus Production
of a Tobe Hooper Film
A Cannon Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir, 2d unit crew
2d unit dir, 2d unit crew
2d unit 1st asst dir, 2d unit crew
2d unit 2d asst dir, 2d unit crew
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
Video assist op
Best boy elec
Key grip
Dolly grip
Gaffer
Rigging gaffer
Rigging best boy
Still photog
2d unit dir of photog, 2d unit crew
Cam op, 2d unit crew
1st asst cam, 2d unit crew
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Post prod supv
1st asst ed
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
2d asst ed
2d asst ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutting
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Leadperson art
Set dec
Prop master
Prop asst
Prop asst
Const coord
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Costumer
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus ed
SOUND
Boom op
Sd mixer
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Foley supv
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley asst
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd mixer, 2d unit crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Model maker
Spec eff coord
Spec eff leadman
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Mechanical spec eff
Title des
Title des
Main titles and opt
MAKEUP
Spec makeup eff by
Makeup
Hairstylist
Spec eff makeup crew
Spec eff makeup crew
Spec eff makeup crew
Spec eff makeup crew
Spec eff makeup crew
Spec eff makeup crew
Cosmetic lenses by
Cosmetic lenses by
PRODUCTION MISC
Exec in charge of prod
Los Angeles casting
Los Angeles casting
Austin casting
Prod coord
Loc mgr
Prod accountant
Unit pub
Prod asst
Prod asst
Extras casting
Hotel furniture provided by
Prod services and equip provided by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Shame On You,” performed by Timbuk 3, written by Pat McDonald and Barbara K. McDonald, published by Mambadaddi Music/I.R.S. Music, Inc. (BMI), produced by Dennis Herring
“White Night,” performed by Torch Song, written by Connor, published by Linear Music, produced by William Orbit and Laurie Mayer, mixed by William Orbit and Dick O’Dell
“Goo Goo Muck,” performed by The Cramps, written by Ronni Cook, published by NRM Publishing, produced by The Cramps
+
SONGS
“Shame On You,” performed by Timbuk 3, written by Pat McDonald and Barbara K. McDonald, published by Mambadaddi Music/I.R.S. Music, Inc. (BMI), produced by Dennis Herring
“White Night,” performed by Torch Song, written by Connor, published by Linear Music, produced by William Orbit and Laurie Mayer, mixed by William Orbit and Dick O’Dell
“Goo Goo Muck,” performed by The Cramps, written by Ronni Cook, published by NRM Publishing, produced by The Cramps
“No One Lives Forever,” performed by Oingo Boingo, written by Danny Elfman, published by Little Maestro Music, produced by Danny Elfman and Steve Barteck
“Life Is Hard,” performed by Timbuk 3, written by Pat McDonald, published by Mambadaddi Music/I.R.S. Music, Inc. (BMI), produced by Dennis Herring
“Over The Shoulder,” performed by Concrete Blonde, written by Johnette Napolitano and Jim Mankey, published by Happy Hermit/I.R.S. Music, Inc. (BMI), produced by Earle Mankey
“Crazy Crazy Mama,” performed and written by Roky Erickson, published by Orb Music Company (ASCAP), courtesy of Pink Dust Records, produced by Duane Aslaksen
“Haunted Head,” performed by Concrete Blonde, written by Johnette Napolitano and Jim Mankey, published by Happy Hermit/I.R.S. Music, Inc. (BMI), produced by Earle Mankey
“Good To Be Bad,” performed by The Lords Of The New Church, written by Stiv Bator and Brian James, lyrical inspiration by Kit Carson, published by Illegal Songs, Inc. (BMI), produced by Lords with Dennis Herring
“Strange Things Happen,” performed by Stewart Copeland, written by Stewart Copeland, published by Regatta Music, Ltd, produced by Stewart Copeland.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Texas Chainsaw Massacre Part 2
Release Date:
22 August 1986
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 22 August 1986
Production Date:
began 5 May 1986
Copyright Claimant:
Cannon Films, Inc., & Cannon International, B.V.
Copyright Date:
15 December 1986
Copyright Number:
PA314224
Physical Properties:
Sound
Recorded in Ultra-Stereo
Color
Duration(in mins):
95
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On August 18, 1973, five young people in a van ran out of gas on a farm road in South Texas. The next morning, the lone survivor, Sally Hardesty-Enright, was picked up on a roadside. The hysterical girl said she escaped from a family of chainsaw-wielding cannibals who hacked up her brother and friends for barbeque. Sally sank into a catatonic state and Texas lawmen mounted a month-long manhunt, but could not locate the farmhouse. No killers or victims were found to prove that a crime occurred. Officially, on the record, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre never happened. But over the years, reports of bizarre, grisly chainsaw mass murders persisted across the state of Texas. For the next thirteen years, Sally’s uncle, Lieutenant “Lefty” Enright, searched for the killers. At a small radio station near Dallas, Texas, disc jockey Vanita “Stretch” Brock receives a telephone call from two drunk teenage boys heading to Dallas for the weekend. The boys refuse to hang up their car phone and the station’s engineer, L. G. McPeters, is unable to disconnect their call. That evening, as the drunk teens near Dallas, they call the station again and keep Stretch on the line as they encounter a truck which chases the boys. A chainsaw-wielding killer rises from the truck bed, slashes the roof on the boys’ convertible and slices off part of the driver’s head. Stretch hears the boys scream before their car crashes. The next day, Lt. Lefty Enright inspects the crime scene as police arrive. The lead officer claims it was an accident caused by wild kids. ... +


On August 18, 1973, five young people in a van ran out of gas on a farm road in South Texas. The next morning, the lone survivor, Sally Hardesty-Enright, was picked up on a roadside. The hysterical girl said she escaped from a family of chainsaw-wielding cannibals who hacked up her brother and friends for barbeque. Sally sank into a catatonic state and Texas lawmen mounted a month-long manhunt, but could not locate the farmhouse. No killers or victims were found to prove that a crime occurred. Officially, on the record, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre never happened. But over the years, reports of bizarre, grisly chainsaw mass murders persisted across the state of Texas. For the next thirteen years, Sally’s uncle, Lieutenant “Lefty” Enright, searched for the killers. At a small radio station near Dallas, Texas, disc jockey Vanita “Stretch” Brock receives a telephone call from two drunk teenage boys heading to Dallas for the weekend. The boys refuse to hang up their car phone and the station’s engineer, L. G. McPeters, is unable to disconnect their call. That evening, as the drunk teens near Dallas, they call the station again and keep Stretch on the line as they encounter a truck which chases the boys. A chainsaw-wielding killer rises from the truck bed, slashes the roof on the boys’ convertible and slices off part of the driver’s head. Stretch hears the boys scream before their car crashes. The next day, Lt. Lefty Enright inspects the crime scene as police arrive. The lead officer claims it was an accident caused by wild kids. However, Lefty disagrees and wants to speak with any witnesses, and the officer promises to release Lefty’s theory about chainsaw killers to the press. Stretch sees the derisive article about Lefty in the newspaper. She goes to his hotel room, and reveals she did not erase the station’s audio recording of the event. She wants him to listen to it and be interviewed on her show. She admits it is a small radio station, but promises they reach a wide audience in north Texas. Lefty does not want her help and tells her to stay out of his way. Stretch leaves, but is certain this is a chance to do something important on her radio show. She joins L. G. McPeters and they report on a local chili cook-off, where Drayton “Cook” Sawyer wins for the second year and proclaims using “prime” meat is the secret to his success. Lefty purchases three chainsaws and waits outside the radio station until Stretch arrives for her night shift. He claims the chainsaw killers have been living in northeast Texas for two years, but police have reported the murders as accidents. Lefty admits he needs Stretch’s assistance and asks her to play the tape of the accident on her radio station to lure the killers out of hiding. As Drayton Sawyer drives his food truck home, he receives a telephone call from his sons who tell him to listen to Stretch’s broadcast, and Drayton is infuriated that Stretch recorded his sons murdering the teens. At the end of their shift, L. G. asks Stretch to join him for a cup of coffee, but she refuses and waits at the station for Lefty. Upset, L. G. rushes out, and forgets to lock the door behind him. Moments later, Stretch hears someone in the waiting room and discovers “Chop-Top” Sawyer. The frightening man wears another man’s face over his own and continually scratches the metal plate on his scalp with a wire hangar. When Stretch asks Chop-Top to leave, his brother “Bubba,” also known as “Leatherface,” enters with a chainsaw. Leatherface also wears another person’s face as a mask, and accidentally buzzes his brother’s head with the chainsaw, knocking off Chop-Top’s mask. Leatherface chases Stretch, but she locks herself in a room. L. G. returns to the station with coffee for Stretch, and Leatherface joins Chop-Top in attacking L. G. with a hammer. Leatherface returns to Stretch’s hiding place and cuts through the wall. He backs her into a corner, aiming his chainsaw between her legs. Trying not to show fear, Stretch insists that Leatherface is not mad at her and she wonders how “good” he is. As she confronts him, Leatherface becomes aroused and cannot kill her. He rejoins his brother and pretends he murdered Stretch. They drag L. G.’s body to their truck and speed off. Stretch is furious that Lefty is late and does not want the killers to get away, so she follows them in her Jeep to the abandoned Texas Battleland Amusement Park. As she parks outside the gates and heads into the park grounds, Lefty arrives and admits he used her as bait to find the killer’s hideout. Stretch falls down a steam vent into the tunnels beneath the park and lands among a pile of skeletons. Armed with his chainsaws, Lefty finds the entrance to the tunnels. Determined to destroy the “devil’s playground,” Lefty fires up his chainsaws and starts chopping beams. Meanwhile, Stretch hears Drayton order his sons to start working because they have a big crowd to feed. L. G.’s body lies near Stretch, and Leatherface carves the skin off L. G.’s face. Repulsed, Stretch moves and Leatherface discovers her. As Drayton and Chop-Top approach, she hides in the shadows and Leatherface holds up L. G.’s severed face. They leave Leatherface to his work and he places the bloody mask over her face. Stretch is horrified, but Leatherface will not let her remove it and dances with her. When they hear Lefty’s chainsaws in the distance, Leatherface ties up Stretch and leaves. L. G. is still alive and frees Stretch before he dies. She takes off the face mask and places it back on L. G. As Drayton yells at his sons about the intruder, Stretch tries to sneak past them. Drayton sees her and his sons chase Stretch through the tunnels. When Leatherface reaches her, Stretch begs him to let her go but he refuses. Drayton and Chop-Top are upset that Leatherface did not kill her at the station. Chop-Top teases his brother about having a girl friend, then knocks Stretch out. When she regains consciousness she is tied to their dinner table, which is populated by skeletons and their feeble grandfather. Drayton orders Leatherface to bring Stretch to the grandfather, who will kill her. They place her head over a bucket at the old man’s feet and he attempts to hit her with a sledgehammer, but drops it several times before hitting her head. Lefty arrives with his chainsaws, frees Stretch, and tells her to run while he faces off with Leatherface. As Lefty slices open Leatherface’s stomach, Drayton hides under the table. Grandfather throws his sledgehammer, but it hits Leatherface, who drops onto the table as Lefty triumphantly brandishes his chainsaws. Chop-Top chases Stretch as she runs out of the tunnels and climbs the stairs to the top of “Battleland Mountain.” Inside the peak, she finds their grandmother’s corpse, clutching a chainsaw. Chop-Top attacks her with a knife, but Stretch slices him with the chainsaw and he falls off the mountain and into a tunnel. Stretch screams triumphantly as she raises the chainsaw over her head. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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