Under the Cherry Moon (1986)

PG-13 | 98 mins | Drama, Romance | 2 July 1986

Director:

Prince

Writer:

Becky Johnston

Cinematographer:

Michael Ballhaus

Editor:

Rebecca Ross

Production Designer:

Richard Sylbert

Production Company:

Warner Bros.
Full page view
HISTORY

       A 16 Sep 1985 HR article announced that principal photography began that day at locations in the Cote d’Azur, France, and at Studios La Victorine in Nice, France, during a ten-week filming schedule. An 8 Oct 1985 HR news brief stated that the film’s budget was $9 million. A 2 Dec 1985 HR brief reported that principal photography had been completed. However, Prince returned to the Cote d’Azur for an unspecified amount of time to reshoot a few scenes, according to a 14 May 1986 Var news item.
       Articles in the 7 Nov 1985 LAHExam and 20 Nov 1985 LADN state that director Mary Lambert left the project in Oct 1985 following repeated creative clashes with Prince during filming, and Prince assumed directing chores. A 5 Nov 1985 DV article reported that according to Lambert’s severance settlement, she completed sixteen days of shooting before her departure. A Directors Guild Of America (DGA) rule that prevented stars from taking over directing midway did not apply in this instance because filming occurred on foreign soil. Also, actor Steven Berkoff replaced Terence Stamp after Stamp resigned.
       A 3 Jul 1986 LAHExam article stated that a world premiere screening was held 1 Jul 1985 in Sheridan, WY. A 9 Jul 1986 DV news item reported that another charity screening was scheduled that day at the DGA in West Hollywood, CA.
       The picture marked the theatrical feature film debut of actress Kristin Scott Thomas.
       End credits state: “With special thanks to the municipalities of Antibes, Beaulieu and Nice"; “Filmed at ... More Less

       A 16 Sep 1985 HR article announced that principal photography began that day at locations in the Cote d’Azur, France, and at Studios La Victorine in Nice, France, during a ten-week filming schedule. An 8 Oct 1985 HR news brief stated that the film’s budget was $9 million. A 2 Dec 1985 HR brief reported that principal photography had been completed. However, Prince returned to the Cote d’Azur for an unspecified amount of time to reshoot a few scenes, according to a 14 May 1986 Var news item.
       Articles in the 7 Nov 1985 LAHExam and 20 Nov 1985 LADN state that director Mary Lambert left the project in Oct 1985 following repeated creative clashes with Prince during filming, and Prince assumed directing chores. A 5 Nov 1985 DV article reported that according to Lambert’s severance settlement, she completed sixteen days of shooting before her departure. A Directors Guild Of America (DGA) rule that prevented stars from taking over directing midway did not apply in this instance because filming occurred on foreign soil. Also, actor Steven Berkoff replaced Terence Stamp after Stamp resigned.
       A 3 Jul 1986 LAHExam article stated that a world premiere screening was held 1 Jul 1985 in Sheridan, WY. A 9 Jul 1986 DV news item reported that another charity screening was scheduled that day at the DGA in West Hollywood, CA.
       The picture marked the theatrical feature film debut of actress Kristin Scott Thomas.
       End credits state: “With special thanks to the municipalities of Antibes, Beaulieu and Nice"; “Filmed at La Victorine, Nice and on locations in the South of France and Miami”; and, "Love God, May U Live 2 See the Dawn." Music credits also include the statement: "With special thanks 2 Clare Fischer 4 making brighter the colors black and white." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
5 Nov 1985
p. 1, 14
Daily Variety
9 Jul 1986
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Sep 1985
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Oct 1985
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Dec 1985
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jul 1986
p. 4.
LAHExam
7 Nov 1985
---
LAHExam
3 Jul 1966
Section A, p. 2.
Los Angeles Daily News
20 Nov 1985
---
Los Angeles Times
4 Jul 1986
Section F, p. 7.
New York Times
3 Jul 1986
p. 24.
Variety
14 May 1986
---
Variety
9 Jul 1986
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Warner Bros. Presents
A Cavallo, Ruffalo, and Fargnoli Production
A Film by Prince
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
Cam asst
Stills photog
Aerial photog
Gaffer
Best boy
Key grip
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Cams, lenses and grip equip by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed (France)
Asst ed (France)
Videotape ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dresser
Asst set dresser
Prod buyer
Asst buyer
Propman
Chief carptenter
Chief stagehand
Chief painter
Chief drapes
Drapes asst
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost coord
Ward supv
Ward asst
Ward asst
Des clothes supplied by
Des clothes supplied by
Miss Stewart's clothes by
MUSIC
Mus ed
Orch comp and arr by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom man
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Foley ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec at
VISUAL EFFECTS
Title des
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup asst
Makeup asst
Hairdresser
Hairdresser
Hairdresser for Prince
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Creative consultant
Prod supv
Unit mgr
Unit mgr
Loc mgr
Supv accountant
Prod accountant
Casting supv (France)
Scr supv
Scr supv
Accounting for PRN Productions
Accounting for PRN Productions
Prod secy
Prod asst (France)
Prod asst (France)
Prod asst (France)
French accountant
Post prod coord
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Accounts secy
Asst to Prince
Asst to Prince
Asst to Prince
Los Angeles liaison
Prods asst (L.A.)
Prods asst (L.A.)
Casting asst (France)
Pub (France)
Action vehicle coord
Transport mgr
Prod office secy
Pub secy
Prod office runner
STAND INS
Stuntman
Stuntman
COLOR PERSONNEL
Film processed at
SOURCES
SONGS
"An Honest Man," written and performed by Prince and the Revolution
"Christopher Tracy's Parade," written by John L. Nelson and Prince, performed by Prince and the Revolution
"Do U Lie," written and performed by Prince and the Revolution
+
SONGS
"An Honest Man," written and performed by Prince and the Revolution
"Christopher Tracy's Parade," written by John L. Nelson and Prince, performed by Prince and the Revolution
"Do U Lie," written and performed by Prince and the Revolution
"Mia Boca," written and performed by Prince and the Revolution
"New Position," written and performed by Prince and the Revolution
"I Wonder U," written and performed by Prince and the Revolution
"Alexa De Paris," written and performed by Prince and the Revolution
"Girls & Boys," written and performed by Prince and the Revolution
"♥
or $," written and performed by Prince and the Revolution
"Life Can Be So Nice," written and performed by Prince and the Revolution
"Under The Cherry Moon," written by John L. Nelson and Prince, performed by Prince and the Revolution
"Venus De Milo," written and performed by Prince and the Revolution
"Old Friends 4 Sale," written and performed by Prince and the Revolution
"AnotherLoverHoleInYoHead," written and performed by Prince and the Revolution
"Kiss," written and performed by Prince and the Revolution
"Sometimes It Snows In April," written and performed by Prince and the Revolution
"Mountains," written and performed by Prince and the Revolution.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
2 July 1986
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Sheridan, WY: 1 July 1985
Los Angeles opening: 2 July 1986
New York opening: 3 July 1986
Production Date:
16 September--late November 1985
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 October 1986
Copyright Number:
PA307732
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Black and White
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
98
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28197
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On the French Riviera, Christopher Tracy and his brother, “Tricky,” divide their time between being musicians at a posh hotel and pursuing wealthy women. One evening, a lady named Mrs. Wellington plies Christopher with drinks as he plays piano. They exchange longing looks and later, they make love in her hotel room. Mrs. Wellington lives off of a $3 million divorce settlement but Christopher has his sights set higher. When the newspaper society pages announce that shipping heiress Mary Sharon is celebrating her twenty-first birthday, Christopher wrangles an invitation. All of France’s "glitterati" attend Mary’s birthday party. Wearing only a bath towel, Mary exposes her nude body and asks her guests if they like her birthday suit. After she accompanies the band from behind a drum kit, Mary notices Christopher and decides that he is a hustler who has crashed her party. When he sneaks into her bedroom, she kicks him out. As he leaves, he shows her birthday invitations that were sent to him and Tricky. Mrs. Wellington is also a party guest and Christopher goes home with her. The next day, Mary Sharon is intrigued by Christopher, finds him and hurls insults as he plays for the lunch crowd in the hotel dining room. Tricky charms Mary as they dance, and she invites the brothers to join her the following evening. Christopher cuts in and dances with Mary on an outdoor patio. They engage in a verbal sparring match to uncover each other’s motives that ends poorly, and Christopher returns to work. Later, the brothers party with Mary at an elegant restaurant. Christopher and Tricky take over the dance floor with a ... +


On the French Riviera, Christopher Tracy and his brother, “Tricky,” divide their time between being musicians at a posh hotel and pursuing wealthy women. One evening, a lady named Mrs. Wellington plies Christopher with drinks as he plays piano. They exchange longing looks and later, they make love in her hotel room. Mrs. Wellington lives off of a $3 million divorce settlement but Christopher has his sights set higher. When the newspaper society pages announce that shipping heiress Mary Sharon is celebrating her twenty-first birthday, Christopher wrangles an invitation. All of France’s "glitterati" attend Mary’s birthday party. Wearing only a bath towel, Mary exposes her nude body and asks her guests if they like her birthday suit. After she accompanies the band from behind a drum kit, Mary notices Christopher and decides that he is a hustler who has crashed her party. When he sneaks into her bedroom, she kicks him out. As he leaves, he shows her birthday invitations that were sent to him and Tricky. Mrs. Wellington is also a party guest and Christopher goes home with her. The next day, Mary Sharon is intrigued by Christopher, finds him and hurls insults as he plays for the lunch crowd in the hotel dining room. Tricky charms Mary as they dance, and she invites the brothers to join her the following evening. Christopher cuts in and dances with Mary on an outdoor patio. They engage in a verbal sparring match to uncover each other’s motives that ends poorly, and Christopher returns to work. Later, the brothers party with Mary at an elegant restaurant. Christopher and Tricky take over the dance floor with a large audio cassette player “boom box,” and gets the crowd swinging to roll and roll music. The maître d’ summons Mary’s father, who demands that she leave, and orders his associates to do background checks on the Tracy brothers. Meanwhile, Mary has fallen for the Tracys' charm and sense of fun. When Mr. Sharon gives his daughter a generous bundle of cash as an apology for missing her birthday party. Separating her from her friends, she asks Christopher and Tricky to help her spend it. They buy expensive clothes, a sports car, and Rolex watches. Although Tricky considers Mary another one of their business deals, Christopher contemplates quitting show business to be with her. At night, Christopher arranges to meet Mary at a deserted racetrack. After a mock drag race, Mary and Christopher make love while Tricky waits for Christopher and Mary to appear at a hip nightclub. When Mary teases Christopher about his poor spelling, he criticizes her for being a poor little rich girl and threatens to call her father to come get her. Christopher does call Mr. Sharon, boasts that he and Mary are in love, and Mr. Sharon will never break them apart. Mary hangs up the phone, and insists that her father has the power to destroy Christopher. In the morning, Mary and her father fight about her sordid social life. He is furious that she is sabotaging her engagement to Jonathan Donahue, a suitor who is a member of a wealthy family. At their apartment, Tricky is angry that Christopher has deviated from their usual arrangement to become Mary’s lover, and left him waiting at the nightclub. When Tricky insists that Mary will use him and leave him, Christopher stalks off and finds Mary in the lobby. She suggests they run away for a couple of hours. They make love in a grotto along the cliffs. In a drunken rage, Tricky confronts his brother and Mary when they return. He wants to know if he will still get his thirty percent cut if Christopher marries Mary. Her mood turns icy and she retreats into her father’s chauffeur-driven Rolls Royce, which was following the lovers. Christopher drinks to drown his pain, and visits Mrs. Wellington, who hands him a $100,000 check from Mr. Sharon. The money is his if he promises never to see Mary again. When he refuses, she tells him Mary and her mother plan to leave for New York on their private plane. Christopher kidnaps Mary at the airport, and seduces her in the back seat of his car as they try to decide if they still have a relationship. Mr. Sharon’s associates ambush Tricky but he escapes. At the grotto, Mary reads romantic poetry that Christopher has written as Tricky warns his brother that Mr. Sharon and his men are scouring the harbor. As Christopher docks his boat near the grotto, Mr. Sharon’s men shoot him dead. Although she mourns for Christopher, Mary buys a luxury building in Miami, Florida, and hires Tricky to be the manager. She misses Christopher, but plans to visit Tricky in a few months to check on their investment. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.