Weekend Warriors (1986)

R | 85 mins | Comedy | 17 October 1986

Full page view
HISTORY

Hollywood Air Force Base was a working title for the film.
       Although a 12 Feb 1985 DV brief stated that principal photography would begin 15 Apr 1985, a 17 May 1985 DV production chart announced that filming began 1 May 1985 in Los Angeles, CA. According to an 18 Jun 1985 DV news item, principal photography was completed that day on schedule after thirty-three days of filming.
       An invitation in AMPAS library files announced a preview screening held at 10:30 a.m. on 16 Oct 1986 at the Burbank Studios.
       The 12 Feb 1985 DV reported that the film marked Bert Convy’s theatrical directorial debut.
       The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “The producers wish to thank the following for their cooperation: Domino’s Pizza; Unlimited Aircraft, Inc.; Tom Udell”; and, “The producers wish to acknowledge the cooperation of: Hollywood Air Force, a division of Wright Aircraft International, which is in no way associated with this ... More Less

Hollywood Air Force Base was a working title for the film.
       Although a 12 Feb 1985 DV brief stated that principal photography would begin 15 Apr 1985, a 17 May 1985 DV production chart announced that filming began 1 May 1985 in Los Angeles, CA. According to an 18 Jun 1985 DV news item, principal photography was completed that day on schedule after thirty-three days of filming.
       An invitation in AMPAS library files announced a preview screening held at 10:30 a.m. on 16 Oct 1986 at the Burbank Studios.
       The 12 Feb 1985 DV reported that the film marked Bert Convy’s theatrical directorial debut.
       The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “The producers wish to thank the following for their cooperation: Domino’s Pizza; Unlimited Aircraft, Inc.; Tom Udell”; and, “The producers wish to acknowledge the cooperation of: Hollywood Air Force, a division of Wright Aircraft International, which is in no way associated with this production.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
12 Feb 1985.
---
Daily Variety
17 May 1985.
---
Daily Variety
18 Jun 1985.
---
Los Angeles Times
18 Oct 1986
p. 9.
Variety
29 Oct 1986
p. 11.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Convy-Fimberg production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Co-prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
3d asst cam
Still photog
Video assist op
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Generator op
Film laboratory
Cam systems by
ART DIRECTORS
Asst art dir
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
2d asst ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Asst lead man
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Cost asst
Cost asst
MUSIC
Orig mus
Mus supv
Orchestrations by
Mus ed
Rec eng
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd des
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
ADR mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Title des
Titles and opticals
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup/Hair
Asst makeup/Hair
Asst makeup/Hair
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Exec in charge of prod
Creative consultant
Prod coord
Prod secy
Asst to the dir
Scr supv
Tech adv
Casting assoc
Casting asst
Casting asst
Extras casting
Extras casting assoc
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Craft service
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Completion guarantor
Completion guarantor
Animals
Animals
Caterer
Caterer
Voice casting
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Eastman col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Pretty Little Angel Eyes,” composed by Tommy Boyce and Curtis Lee, performed by Curtis Lee, published by Bri-Deb Music Corporation
“Tossin’ And Turnin’,” composed by Malou Rene and Ritchie Adams, performed by Bobby Lewis, published by Harvard Music Inc. and Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp.
“Let’s Twist Again,” composed by Kal Mann and Dave Appell, published by Kalmann Music Inc.
+
SONGS
“Pretty Little Angel Eyes,” composed by Tommy Boyce and Curtis Lee, performed by Curtis Lee, published by Bri-Deb Music Corporation
“Tossin’ And Turnin’,” composed by Malou Rene and Ritchie Adams, performed by Bobby Lewis, published by Harvard Music Inc. and Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp.
“Let’s Twist Again,” composed by Kal Mann and Dave Appell, published by Kalmann Music Inc.
“Louie, Louie,” composed by Richard Berry, published by Limax Music Inc.
“The U. S. Air Force,” composed by Robert Crawford, published by Carl Fisher, Inc.
“Summertime Blues,” composed by Eddie Crockran and Jerry Capehart, published by Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp., Hill & Range Songs Inc., Elvis Presley Music Inc. and Gladys Music
“Let The Good Times Roll,” composed by Leonard Lee, published by Atlantic Music
“Wipe Out,” composed by The Surfaris, published by Miraleste Music Company and Robin Hood Music Company.
+
PERFORMERS
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Hollywood Air Force Base
Release Date:
17 October 1986
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 17 October 1986
Production Date:
1 May--18 June 1985
Copyright Claimant:
Hollywood Air Force Base Associates, Ltd.
Copyright Date:
1 December 1986
Copyright Number:
PAu952742
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Prints
Release prints by Deluxe®
Duration(in mins):
85
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In August 1961, in order to avoid the military draft, a group of friends consisting of Hollywood actors, screenwriters, choreographers, stuntmen, directors, makeup men and gossip columnists, join the Air National Guard, which requires them to spend two weekends a month doing drills for the military. As magazine writer and aspiring screenwriter Vince Tucker drives to the base, drill sergeant Elroy T. Burdge closes the gate three minutes before roll call, waiting for Vince to show up late. Spotting the locked gate, Vince signals a construction crew to hoist him over the fence, and drop him on time for roll call. His fellow soldiers cheer him as Vince takes his place on the line. Soon, Vince receives a tip that Congressman Balljoy plans to make a surprise visit to the base. In turn, Vince warns Colonel Archer, a former “B” movie actor, to be prepared. Vince suggests that if Congressman Balljoy conducts a full in-depth inspection, it will be apparent that the soldiers are not combat ready, and diversionary tactics will be needed. Later, Sgt. Burdge breaks up some gambling, and demands that guardsmen load equipment into military transport planes. At the mess hall, the squadron feeds soldier Phil McCracken several servings of baked beans and bet whether human gas is combustible. The lights are extinguished and a match is struck. As McCracken delivers his end of the bet, Congressman Balljoy appears, then leaves without comment. Balljoy reprimands Col. Archer for presiding over a bunch of undisciplined misfits, deadbeats. Balljoy wants disciplinary action taken, but Archer is unfazed by the congressman’s threats, and the guardsmen party their Saturday night away. However, the next morning, Sgt. Burdge makes ... +


In August 1961, in order to avoid the military draft, a group of friends consisting of Hollywood actors, screenwriters, choreographers, stuntmen, directors, makeup men and gossip columnists, join the Air National Guard, which requires them to spend two weekends a month doing drills for the military. As magazine writer and aspiring screenwriter Vince Tucker drives to the base, drill sergeant Elroy T. Burdge closes the gate three minutes before roll call, waiting for Vince to show up late. Spotting the locked gate, Vince signals a construction crew to hoist him over the fence, and drop him on time for roll call. His fellow soldiers cheer him as Vince takes his place on the line. Soon, Vince receives a tip that Congressman Balljoy plans to make a surprise visit to the base. In turn, Vince warns Colonel Archer, a former “B” movie actor, to be prepared. Vince suggests that if Congressman Balljoy conducts a full in-depth inspection, it will be apparent that the soldiers are not combat ready, and diversionary tactics will be needed. Later, Sgt. Burdge breaks up some gambling, and demands that guardsmen load equipment into military transport planes. At the mess hall, the squadron feeds soldier Phil McCracken several servings of baked beans and bet whether human gas is combustible. The lights are extinguished and a match is struck. As McCracken delivers his end of the bet, Congressman Balljoy appears, then leaves without comment. Balljoy reprimands Col. Archer for presiding over a bunch of undisciplined misfits, deadbeats. Balljoy wants disciplinary action taken, but Archer is unfazed by the congressman’s threats, and the guardsmen party their Saturday night away. However, the next morning, Sgt. Burdge makes an official announcement that the 73rd battalion is now part of the regular army. Soldiers line up at the pay phone, calling anybody they know who can exempt them from combat. When they discover that their time off base is restricted until further notice, they arrange a clandestine meeting to formulate a plan. At the meeting, Vince announces that since Balljoy will not return his calls, he has typed up bogus orders to fly to Washington, D. C., where he plans to confront the congressman. Later, Cory Seacomb finagles a medical discharge, and returns to writing gossip. During his visit with Balljoy, Vince discovers the only way to prevent a combat assignment is to pass inspection with flying colors. Back at the base, he tells his fellow soldiers that they need to get rid of the "top brass," and achieve a state of phony readiness. First, they drug Burdge's drink and send him to Las Vegas, Nevada. There, after watching a nightclub act performed by some of his soldiers, Burdge is introduced to a buxom blonde showgirl, Danielle Dubois. He believes he is about to have sex with Danielle, when Betty Beep, a food truck proprietor from the base, takes her place. The soldiers take a series of incriminating photographs of Burdge in bed with Betty and use it against him as blackmail. Next, impersonating President Kennedy on the red telephone hotline, soldier Decola instructs Col. Archer to take time off and await further instructions. As Col. Archer heads to the golf course, the soldiers drive truckloads of movie costumes and scenery onto the base. When a captain cannot find Archer to report the disturbance, the soldiers cook up a ruse to get the officer to the infirmary for a physical. Using a rigged growth chart, a plus-size uniform, giant office furniture, and sedatives, the nurse convinces the captain he has a case of “African shrinking sickness.” As Vince’s plan moves forward, Cory Seacomb calls, wanting to know why all the scenery and costumes have left the studio lot. Cory threatens to inform Balljoy of Vince's scheme, so Vince agrees to give him an exclusive story. On the way to the meeting, Vince arranges for a few studio stuntmen to stage a gun battle, and scare Cory into believing that a Mafia boss has put out a contract on him. Meanwhile, a general informs Balljoy that a lot is riding on the upcoming inspection because a Romanian ambassador has been invited to join the delegation. When the 73rd battalion hears of this latest complication, they work around the clock to put on a show. Once the delegation arrives, Col. Archer takes them on a tour of the base. The first stop is the recreation room, which has been transformed into a nightclub with palm trees and waitresses wearing floral bikinis, handing out leis. Betty Beep, in full Polynesian costume, accompanied by two soldiers in drag, belts out a song, as waitresses bring the delegation drinks. Soon, the colonel guides the group to the next location he refers to as “the tomb of the little known soldier.” There, a soldier poses as a dead colonel in a glass coffin. Balljoy is invited to read a remembrance full of sexual innuendo, name-calling and crude language. Next, Col. Archer takes his guests to the football field, where the battalion stages a Hollywood version of the military complete with a baton fire-twirler, parading ROTC cadets from the University of Southern California, uniformed dancers accompanied by a marching band, and a demonstration of a transport plane being loaded in the record time of four minutes and twenty-seven seconds. For the finale, Vince sends a little person, dressed as a child, onto the runway as the plane taxis. Soldiers McCracken and Dawson are unable to rescue the “child” as planned because their jeep will not start. When Col. Archer senses something is wrong, he grabs a nearby motorcycle and saves the little person from the path of the oncoming plane. While the crowd is ecstatic, Col. Archer notices the "child" has a cigar, and knocks it out of her mouth. Meanwhile, both Balljoy and the Romanian ambassador are moved by the display of patriotism and bravery. Afterward, the guardsmen of the 73rd entertain everyone with a rousing stage show. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.